(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pacific Outlook (July-Dec. 1907)"



*1* 




: s 



. Sir. 



^^*( ,. ' \ ' 




. -*/ 



I 




^4, 






H 






,M 




"ST 



' K~^ 



*5p] 



i 



JMT-' £ """♦ 



D S0D7 D53272A S RY. 

California State Library 

Accession JVo Jr.iJI.tJ'.M.Q. 

Call ^o. ocJQ5.1 ?r 



This book is due on the last date stamped below. 
Books may not be renewed. 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 

SACRAMENTO 



ROOM USE NOV 



DOES NOT C 



1 19S8 



RCULATE 



HISTORIC DEATH SENTENCES 



July 6, 1907 





Unparallel Price® 

Thousands of handsome shirt waists, in the season's best styles, 
await your inspection on our third floor. New model in dainty 
light materials, that are cool and comfortable for hot weather 
are profusely displayed. Vacation time now and you will need 
several additional waits. Nowhere will they cost you less money 
than here. Our efforts are always to have the very best waists 
and to sell them at the very lowest, prices. See list of special 
sales in today's papers. 




BROADWAY 



COR FlfTH ST. 




WHAT 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

OFFERS 

A thorough training in the science of a great pro- 
fession. 

A useful professional career and an opportunity 
to benefit suffering humanity. 

POSITION— INFLUENCE— WEALTH 

Prepare to enter our fall term. Send for free 
booklet to J. W. Cook, Secretary, Daly St. and 
Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Teachers for California 

IfWE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, f If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-cperative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



141990 



MGEEEiG 4WEKLIWD[& 



George Baker Anderson 

CDITOK 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland Kinknid 

ASSOCIATE CDITOR 



Howard Ctark Gattoupe 

MANAGER 1 ^-- > 



Published every Saturday at 433*423 Chamber of Com* 
merce Build ng, Los Angeles. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price SS.OO a year In advance. Single copy JO 
cents on alt news stands. 

Entered i* second-c!a*s matter April 5, 1907, at the postofficc at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March j, 1879. 

Vol. 3. Los Jfngeles. Cat., July 6, 1907 Mo. I 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 

COMMENT 

1 'radically every honest advocate of good roads 
in Los Angeles county has abandoned all hope that 
the unthinkable Southern Pacific "solid three" in 
the Hoard of Supervisors will pay any attention 
whatever to the overwhelming public demand that 
they permit of a reconsideration of the action of 
that body in creating a good roads commission the 
majority in which bears the brand of the machine. 
Walter Parker, whose word is law with these three 
men. turned a neat trick when he participated in 
the informal deliberations of the machine members. 

Well aware of the fact that his presence 

Beneath at the board meeting at that particular 

Contempt time would be received as it has been, 

and realizing that the public knew that 
the Southern Pacific does not want the roads of Los 
Angeles county converted into permanent highways 
of commerce, good all the year round, he com- 
pleted the equation by jumping into the breach at 
the psychological moment. And this is one more 
item of evidence that Parker is a master hand at the 
lowest and most degrading form of cheap politics. 
As the result of the turn that affairs have taken, the 
citizens of the city and county have one more 
charge to be entered on the already long score 
which must be settled by Parker and his superiors 
a little later 1 in. 

* * * 

()f course the supervisors will not make any 
change in the personnel of the tainted commission. 
The body appointed will proceed, under the law, to 



have the necessary surveys made, the election will 
he held and the people will turn down the proposed 
bond &sue by an overwhelming vote, all at an ex- 
pense of about $50,000 to the county. That is a 
foregone conclusion. In the meantime Parker and 
the "solid three" will spend their spare moments in 
laughing in their sleeves at the pretty trick they 
have turned. Yes, they will laugh now, but the 
time of reckoning is surely coming, and Parker and 
his thickly besmirched companion tools of the 
Southern Pacific on the Board of Supervisors need 

not complain at the drastic nature of the 
Deep in methods to be taken to effect their politi- 
the Mire eal and social ostracism. What comes 

to them will be the result of their own 
stupendous folly. Their ignorant, bull-headed de- 
fiance of what they know to be the best thought of 
an enlightened community is, however, hardly a 
source of amazement. So long a time has elapsed 
since they elected to keep themselves, their souls 
and bodies, in the nauseating mire of unclean poli- 
tics that to them the effluvia greeting the nostrils of 
their intellects — such intellects as they may pos- 
sess — when the mire is stirred up afresh by those 
who would remove it from the surface of the body 
politic, is as sweet as is a draught from a "bum 
bottle" to a degraded wretch whose manhood has 
been swallowed up by the monster iniquity of over- 
indulgence in alcoholic drinks. 
* * * 

Nothing better should have been expected of the 
"solid three" than what they have seen fit to hand 
to the public. The personnel of the Board of Super- 
visors offers little hope that anything better is to be 
anticipated. of these men in the future. Take Eld- 
ridge, for example. Last October, during the coun- 
ty campaign, Eldridge, wdiose place on the ticket 
was secured through a deal with Martin Marsh, in 
a local French paper made a bid for the support of 
tile "wide open" element in these words: ".Mr. S. T. 

Eldridge * * seeks the suf- 

Eldridge, frage of the French-speaking popu- 

for Example lation because he is certain that he 

can satisfy their views concerning 
the free trade in wines and liquors in contrast to hi, 
opponent, who wages a determined war against the 
traffic." Eldridge knew, of course, that as super- 
visor he would have nothing whatever to do with 
the liquor traffic in Los Angeles. And his arrant 
demagogy in this instance may be taken as a pretty 
fair index of his disposition to resort to the pettiest 




Pacific Outlook 



of tricks in order to gain such end as he might seek. 
The voters who turned down Dr. Lamb and made 
the election of such a representative as Eldridge 
possible must be proud of their choice. 

* * * 

Speaking of Eldridge and the manner in which 
his election was rendered possible reminds us of 
Marsh, who has been repaid for his service to Eld- 
ridge by appointment to the commission. Marsh 
himself is a politician of much the same stripe as 
his friend and sponsor Eldridge. Both are ward 
politicians — and that tells the whole story. If Eld- 
ridge is in possession of his faculties he must realize 
that he has been a factor in placing his friend Marsh 
in a position which would result in nothing - but 
humiliation to a man of fine sensibilities. (We do 
not desire to be understood as suggesting that 
Marsh has fine sensibilities as a public official ; 

ward politicians would not be ward 
Is It Marsh's politicians if they had.) But Eld- 
Atonement ridge knows, and Marsh, also, if an 

intelligent man, knows that he has 
been appointed to be knocked down, practically, 
when the people come to vote on the proposed bond 
issue. That any man of reasonable intelligence and 
due regard for the opinions of his fellow-men would 
willingly place himself in a position where he is cer- 
tain that he will be utterly discredited as Marsh will 
be when the bonds are voted down — as they will 
be if the election is held — wellnigh surpasses human 
comprehension. It almost looks as if Marsh were 
about to offer himself as a vicarious atonement for 
the infliction of Eldridge upon the people of Los 
Angeles county. 

* * * 

The "solid three' in the Board of Supervisors 
are not the only public officials who are playing the 
game of peanut politics. We are having plenty of 
sport in the same line in municipal affairs. "I owe 
my election to the people," declared Mayor Harper 
immediately after the election, "and shall be mayor 
of the whole people." A little further on he said: 
"My appointments to the police and fire commis- 
sions and the library board will be a guarantee of 
the sort of administration mine is to be. The pub- 
lic may judge of my purpose from the character of 
the men who will surround me in office." The public 
is judging Mayor Harper to a large extent, as he 
predicted would be the case, by the character of 
some of the men who sur- 
The "Guarantee" round him in office, and partly 
Being Made Good by the motives which are be- 
lieved to underlie his appoint- 
ments. Samuel Schenck is one of the men whose 
appointment to office (on the police commission) 
Mayor Harper declared would be a "guarantee of 
the sort of administration" his was to be. On the 



other hand, his refusal to reappoint J. M. Elliott to 
the water board may be taken as an indication that 
he is not controlled so much by his expressed in- 
tention to "be mayor of the whole people" as by a 
desire to repay a personal score. For it is com- 
monly known that Mayor Harper was piqued by the 
refusal of Mr. Elliott, a life-long Democrat, to sup- 
port him in his candidacy for the mayoralty. The 
will of the people appears not to be of half so much 
consequence to the mayor as his own will. 

* * * 

Schenck! — did Mayor' Harper intend that the 
people should regard his appointment of this man 
as a "guarantee of the sort of administration" he 
was to give the city? If so he should not complain 
if the people criticise other administrative acts. 
Schenck was known by the mayor to be a man of 
narrow caliber and unfitted, by reason of his mode 
of life, for the important responsibilities which 
would devolve upon him as member of the police 
commission. Schenck, according to the Herald a 
day or two after the police commission was named, 
"was an enthusiastic Harper man throughout the 
campaign, and backed his enthusiasm to the extent 
of about $8,500." Schenck was known by the may- 
or to be sportively inclined, a man who was willing 
to hazard a bet on pretty nearly 
Reaping What anything having about it an ele- 
He Sowed ment of chance. His habit of im- 
bibing too freely on occasions 
likewise was known to the mayor. There really 
was nothing about Schenck's career which entitled 
him to consideration at the hands of the mayor, ex- 
cepting that, unlike Mr. Elliott, he worked for the 
election of Mr. Harper at the polls ; but there was 
much about his life that should have induced the 
mayor to hesitate a long time before rewarding him 
for his political services. That's the main trouble 
with the mayor. He doesn't hesitate enough. In 
the Schenck incident the mayor is reaping exactly 
what he sowed. For the sake of good government 
in Los Angeles let us hope that Mr. Harper will 
take this late lesson to heart and in his future ap- 
pointments be guided by sentiments loftier than 
those of reward for political services rendered or 
punishment for such services not rendered, as in 
the cases, respectively, of Mr. Schenck and Mr. 
Elliott. 

* * * 

Ernest C. Johnson, writing to the Los Angeles 
Times, criticises Mayor Harper and the City Coun- 
cil for their policy of appointing inspectors for com- 
pelling obedience to numerous city ordinances. Ex- 
perience has shown that inspection, when properly 
conducted, is the essence of good municipal govern- 
ment. The valuable work performed by the oil in- 



Pacific Outlook 



tor in Los Angeles, for instance, which Mr. 

Johnson takes occasion to condemn as useless, has 
been made plain to all. While the foes collected by 

this department as the result of 

A Critic of the inspections made may nol 

City Inspection have equalled the expenses of such 

inspection, the city alone has been 
saved thousands of dollars through the rejection of 
slush and water found in the oil offered for the use 
of the street department — "b. s." as it is commonly 
known. When Mr. Johnson declares that "it is 
difficult to see where this office lias done any good 
worth mentioning," he makes it plain that he has 
not given that attention to the work of this depart- 
ment which a man should give before he enters 
upon a wholesale criticism of its operations. The 
facts do not warrant the conclusion that he has 
reached. 

* * * 

Is it. as Mr. Johnson declares, "an outrage on the 
city" that the recent reports of the restaurant in- 
spectors were published? Suppose that Mr. John- 
son should take his dinner in a restaurant and find 
a juicy quid of tobacco ensconced in a plate of pud- 
ding set before him. What would he do? "Holler?" 
Probably. And then he would kick up the biggest 
kind of a rumpus until somebody was made to 
suffer for his carelessness, or worse. And when he 
takes off his gloves to handle the subject of the 

inspection of lodging houses he as- 

Does He serts : "In the better class of lodg- 

Really Know? ing houses in Chicago there are a 

hundred objectionable insects to 
one that can be found in the poorest houses of this 
city." If Mr. Johnson can furnish evidence that 
he knows more about the conditions in the "poorest 
houses in this city" than do the men employed by 
the city to investigate them, his opinions will have 
weight; but unless he can show that he knows what 
he is talking about his strictures on oil, restaurant 
and lodging house inspection, and on inspection in 
general, should pass with slight notice. Probably 
the most serious attention that will be given to 
them appears in these two paragraphs. 

* * * 

Billingsgate is not argument. When Francis J. 
Heney accused the Los Angeles Times with having 
sold itself, for money, to Patrick Calhoun, naming 
the sum received; when he declared: "The Times 
has tried and is trying its best to stir up strife be- 
tween capital and labor in San Francisco ami has 
acted as a deterrent to the prosecution of the graft 
cases in San Francisco to serve its own ends." and 
that "Any man or newspaper that does that is an 
enemy of San Francisco and of the state of Cali- 
fornia." he simplv echoed the utterances of fact and 



sentiment which for months have been resounding 
from one end of the country to the 
Desperate other. It is a noteworthy fact that 
Expedients among all the exchanges that come to 
the office of the Pacific i hitlook there 
is none published outside of San Francisco — ex- 
cepting the Los Angeles Graphic, which tacitly ad- 
mits that it has si ild i t self to Patrick Calhoun — that 
does not condemn in bitterest terms the diaphanous 
venality of the Los Angeles Times. The fact that 
the chief arguments employed by the Times in con- 
nection with Heney's name are the bludgeon, ana- 
thema and accusations entirely foreign to the San 
Francisco situation indicates the desperate expedi- 
ents to which it has been compelled to resort in its 
effort to direct public opinion into channels leading 
to its own debased and debasing current of thought. 
As we have said, billingsgate is not argument. 

* * * 

William F. Herrin, declares Heney, "has done 
more to debauch men in public life in California 
than all other influences combined." True ; every- 
body will admit it. Herrin himself is aware of the 
fact. Herrin has bought and sold political dele- 
gations to conventions of both parties as a mer- 
chant buys and sells his com- 
Can't Buy modifies. He has bought officials 
All the Press high and low, Republican and 
_ Democratic, from poundmaster and 

road overseer to legislator and judge. He has 
bought newspapers and their editors. But, thank 
God, there are newspapers in California which Her- 
rin, with the entire wealth of the Southern Pacific 
at his command, cannot buy; and these newspapers 
have succeeded in counteracting the baneful in- 
fluence of the purchased press among the intelligent 
and thoughtful .citizens of California. 

* * * 

It is astonishing how the head of any household 
in Los Angeles can permit the women of his family 
to read the Los Angeles Daily Times. A glance at 
the society page of last Tuesday will convince any 
man that the columns are not fit for the eyes of 
even the least self-respecting person. This com- 
ment does not concern the three columns given up 
to the chronicling of teas and weddings and bridge 

whist parties, but to the four col- 
Edifying umns devoted to the advertisements 
Society Page of quack doctors who promise to 

cure all sorts of loathsome diseases. 
To add to the general offensiveness, illustrations 
are used and a glimpse of the columns is enough 
to cause the deepest disgust. The society page is 
supposed to be read chiefly by women, but it is 
made up in a way that should prevent the hostesses 
and debutantes from so much as handling the jour- 
nal which offers nothing short of wanton insult 



6 



Pacific Outlook 



when it makes up a page as it made up number 
thirteen for Jul}' 2. 

* * * 

The Pacific Outlook has received from one of the 
• staunchest advocates of good government in this 
city a communication touching upon the question 
of the appointment of city prosecuting officers by 
the district attorney of the county of Los Angeles. 
"The 'plain duty' of the City Council to maintain 
the principle of self-government, in accordance with 
its protest last winter against the influence of the 
legislature," declares this correspondent, "is one 
that vitally concerns the welfare of our city. The 
people should clearly understand the present situa- 
tion and demand that the council shall no longer 
violate the plain requirements of the City Charter. 
This fundamental safegard is useless unless the 
people insist that all officials shall obey it. When 
the council was inveigled by the 'push' to carry out 
a political job by making a deal with the district 
attorney to appoint the city prosecutors in our 
police courts, all of u"s overlooked the last two sec- 
tions of the charter. Any intelligent 
Home Rule man can see, as two councilmen have 
Issue admitted, that these sections prohibit 

such a diversion of power unless the 
voters first agree to it. Indeed one councilman toid 
me that if he had known of these requirements then, 
he would not have voted and thought the council 
would not have voted to carry out what he publicly 
branded as 'a bad law.' This blunder of the council 
was made against the advice of the city attorney 
and was inexcusable, because the council was 'do- 
ing politics' instead of doing what was right and 
trusting time to work out its inevitable justification. 
It also led the council soon afterwards to disobey 
other clear mandatory provisions in the charter to 
which attention was directed. Mr. Fleming of the 
district attorney's office afterwards told the council 
that he and others knew of these last two sections 
of the charter when the bill was pending in the 
legislature. Since any impartial man can see that 
these sections apply to said statute, it is evident 
that such a 'raw political job' was most audacious 
and could succeed only by adroitly managing the 
council." 

* * * 

The statute referred to by this correspondent 
shows that the prosecutors named in it are county 
officers, inasmuch as it requires that "all of" them 
"shall be appointed by the district attorney of the 
county" and that they shall not prosecute "criminal 
cases arising upon violations of the provisions of 
the City Charter or ordinances * * * except 
when requested by the city attorney, who may 
deputize said prosecutors for such purposes." 
"But," adds our corespondent, "the city attorney 



cannot legally take such action until after the coun- 
cil has complied with the requirements of section 

255 in our charter. Since the Cali- 

Charter fornia Supreme Court has decided 

and Statute that in such a case the provisions of 

a freeholders' charter are superior to 
any later statute, it can not go into effect as to this 
city until the charter is obeyed. In view of these 
plain facts it is not now 'the programme of the 
legal department of the city,' but the ill-advised 
scheme foisted upon the council by tools of law- 
breaking corporations, to have 'the entire matter 
left to the courts.' They expect to gain by the law's 
delays. But the best interests of the city demand 
that this simple question of fundamental rights and 
obedience to law should be settled at once by the 
council, as required by the charter." 

* * * 

"Since the people will never approve such 'peanut 
politics,' " concludes our correspondent, "it would 
be only a waste of time for the council to enact such 
an ordinance as section 255 of the charter requires. 
But in accordance with section 49 the council ought 
at once to re-enact ordinance No. 14,760, that the 
city attorney may properly perform his duty as pre- 
scribed by the charter. Since it would not be well 
to attach the emergency clause to 

Contention such an ordinance, as the question 
Well-grounded is now before the Court of Ap- 
peals, the ordinance would not 
take effect for thirty days. Hence the people should 
urge the council to act immediately." Viewed from 
the layman's standpoint the arguments presented 
by this correspondent seem sound. Unless some 
other statute intervenes his contention appears to 
be well-grounded. We do not believe that City At- 
torney Hewitt would willfully become a party to 
"peanut politics ;" hence we commend to his care- 
ful consideration the facts and arguments advanced 
by this writer. 

* * * 

"A slave," says the Philistine, "is a person with 
a servile mind, who quickly crooks the pregnant 
hinges of the knee that thrift may follow fawning, 
who gratifies his wants either through cringing- 
flattery or coercion, and who tyrannizes over others 
whenever he has a chance." Dr. Hubbard may have 
gone on : "A slave is a person who, in order to serve 
his master with that degree of success which will 
win for him the ducatesque reward which makes 
thralls of all who lust for the auriferous cowlet, not 
only faithfully performs the task arbi- 
Boss and trarily set for him, but who anticipates 

Slave the slightest wish of his master by 
doing the unspoken bidding of the lat- 
ter." Especially might the latter definition be made 
to apply to the slaves of the pen who, under the lash 



Pacific Outlook 



1 



wielded by the Herrins and the Calhouns, overreach 
then Such as these — ami California ha- a 

few to exhibit t<> the world— serve two masters; and 
the master Cupidity is a* relentless as the master 

Calhoun or the master Herrin. Many a man posing 
before the public as a boss is. in reality, but a slave. 
as witness Knef. Those who do the bidding of the 
by their very acts prove themselves slaves. 

* * * 

The police hoard of San Francisco seems deter- 
mined to do its utmost to plunge the United States 
and Japan into war. No sane man' expects that it 
will succeed in doing so, but so long as the body 
remains as at present constituted, it will be the 
source of never-ending embarrassment to the ad- 
ministration. Its latest piece of asininity is the 
denial of the application of several Japanese inhabi- 
tants of San Francisco for the renewal of theirper- 
mits to maintain intelligence offices, and the denial 
of the application of two other Japanese to obtain 
permits to conduct the same business. It is a 

notorious fact that the only reason why 

Wild the requests were denied is that the ap- 

As Ever plicants are of the proscribed race. If 

they had been Irish, or French, or 
English, it goes without saying that no such ban 
would have been placed upon them. So long as 
the administration in San Francisco adhere to its 
policy of doing everything within its power to ag- 
gravate Japan, while pacificatory measures are being 
adopted at Washington and Tokio, we may expect 
to see the demogogues of the island empire inciting 
the lower and middle classes and the "opposition" 
in their country to the issuance of manifestoes in 
favor of open hostilities. It is to be hoped that as 
soon as .Mayor Schmitz can be put where he can do 
no further harm, his successor will replace the 
present police commission with men of a class dif- 
ferent from its Hagertys and its other "exlusion- 
ists." 

* * * 

An incident at the Vale-Harvard race last week 
furnishes a new clue to the character of Edward H. 
Harriman. When Harriman, in defiance of the well- 
known regulations governing spectators, and in 
spite of the warnings he had received, insisted on 
pushing hi s motor boat outside the Hmits pre _ 

scribed for private or excursion boats, he proved 
two things: First, that he is a human hog; second, 
that he feels himself above the law in 
Harriman little things as well as in big things. 
the Hog The regulations made for the safe con- 
duct of a boat race of national interest 
were all right for the common herd, but the sacred 
person of the great railroad magnate, he evidently 
believed, was beyond the jurisdiction of the race au- 
thorities. A man less hull-headed than Harriman 



might have been somewhat affected lo an over- 
whelming public sentiment and would have become 

aware of the danger and folly of trilling with local 
legislation, as well as with federal enactments: but 
we can hanllv anticipate any material change of 
heart in a man who has been a sort of natural-born 
In ig since childhi ioiI. 

* *•* 

Texas is the first state in the Union, it is believed, 
which has inaugurated, through legislative enact- 
ment, warfare against the five-foot-six bed sheet. 
Next week hotels and lodging houses in that state 
which provide their patrons- with beds equipped 
with sheets less than nine feet long will be violators 
of the law. The provision is one which every city 
and every state should make. Bed sheets which do 
not permit of being folded down far enough below 
the chin to cover the comforter or blanket are a dis- 
tinct menace to the health of the occupants of such 
beds. Who can tell what disease-ridden man or 
woman has had his mouth or nose against the com- 
forter or blanket of the bed he occupies when he is 
compelled to spend a night in a hotel or rooming 

house? Who can tell how many per- 
Bed Sheet sons in the United States have con- 
Reform tracted tuberculosis or other dangerous 

maladies as the result of infection from 
this source? The average hotel proprietor — and 
especially the proprietor of the hotel in the average 
small city or town — gives his patrons just as little 
for the money received as the law permits. This 
always has been so and doubtless always will be so. 
Therefore the law should not permit bonifaces to 
compel guests to sleep with their faces against 
disease-infected bed clothing or spend the night 
promenading the streets. Every traveling man in 
the United States will bear testimony to the fact 
that this has been the rule, though there are here 
and there exceptions. But the exceptions are few 
and far between, in any but first-class city hostelries. 
Here is an opportunity for the City Council of Los 
Angeles to bring about a reform that is much 
needed. 

* * * 

Covina's Gala Day 

Covina will celebrate the opening of the branch 
of the Pacific Electric railway connecting it with 
Los Angeles July 20 with a barbecue. The first car 
ran into the pretty little town last Sunday and the 
inhabitants held a mass meeting, at which the pro- 
per manner of expressing enthusiasm was discussed 
and the barbecue was voted a fitting expression of 
joy. Preparations will be made to feed 10.000 per- 
sons. The details of this celebration have been 
placed in the hands of a committee composed of 
George \V. Griffiths, George H. Hazzard, Charles 
Madison, Paul G. Stevens. T. H. Coolman, J. L. 
Matthews and H. M. Houser. 



Pacific Outlook 



NOW FOR THE PEDAGOGUES 



W^hat Their Visit May be Made to Mean to Los -A.ng£eles 



The convention of the National Educational As- 
sociation, which will open in the Auditorium Mon- 
day morning and continue until the afternoon of 
July 12, will mark the fiftieth anniversary of that 
great and influential organization. It is expected 
that about thirty thousand persons from all parts 
of the United States — but few of whom, however, 
are members of the association — will be present. 
While some of these come for the benefits to be de- 
rived from the discussion of ways and means for 
the elevation of the standard of the professional 
educator and allied subjects, the majority of these 
visitors have been attracted to Los Angeles by the 
low rate of railroad fare offered to those who wish 
to avail themselves of this occasion for beholding 
the one spot in America which is entitled to the dis- 




Photo by Mojonier 
Dr. E. C. Moork 
Superintendent uf City Schools 

tinction of being an earthly paradise — Southern 
California. 

The week to be devoted to the session of the 
educators will not be a week of labor exclusively. 
Plenty of pleasure will be sandwiched between the 
hours of listening to addresses and discussions and 
the other work which has been outlined by the 
daily press of the city. Nearly every resort within 
many miles of Los Angeles has secured a place 
upon the programme, as it did during the week of 
the Fiesta. It now looks as if the members of the 
association and the thousands of visitors will be sur- 
feited with pleasurable diversion — if that be pos- 
sible. 

The National Educational Association is the 



largest and most important organization of teacheis 
in the world. As an agency for advancing the 
science of pedagogy it is of untold value. The 
present status of the American teacher, who a few 
years ago was engaged in what was commonly 
the result of the earnest efforts put forth for his 
advancement by this great institution. Its plan of 
holding its meeting's in cities far remote from one 
known as the most poorly paid and the most round- 
ly cursed profession in the world, is very largely 
another, instead of selecting one or two chosen 
localities — the East and the Middle West alternate- 
ly — as the great political parties have usually done, 
has stimulated the interest of Easterners in the 
great West and of Southerners in the North, and 
vice versa. It also enables .teachers and those who 
accompany them on their jaunts to learn by per- 
sonal observation many things regarding the great 
diversification of resources, industries, manners and 
customs in the four corners of the country which 
it is impossible to learn by reading or by interviews 
with those who have been favored through much 
travel. 

Nothing has been left undone by those who have 
charge of the reception and entertainment of the 
visitors to give them what may be called, in the 
vernacular, the "time of their lives." F. O. Story, 
chairman of the general committee in charge of the 
arrangements for the convention, whose portrait ap- 
pears on the front cover of this issue ; O. M. Souden-, 
chairman of the entertainment committee ; Robert 
O. Hoedel, in charge of the work of making public 
the plans for the week ; Dr. E. C. Moore, superin- 
tendent of city schools and chairman of the com- 
mittee on publicity; the members of the local Board 
of Education, the Chamber of Commerce and other 
organizations have co-operated to the end that the 
meeting of 1907 shall outshine all its predecessors. 
And it will. 

Incidentally Los Angeles will receive much good 
advertising, not only as the result of the reports 
regarding our progress and prosperity which are 
bound to be taken to other sections of the country 
by the great army of visitors when they return to 
their homes, but through the sending of something 
like half a million of photograph postal cards which 
have been prepared in this city. These will be 
mailed in large numbers by various schools, civic 
associations and residents of Southern California, 
and by the visitors themselves. Probably no other 
city has ever had prepared such an artistic lot of 
postal card photographs as those ready to send 
broadcast throughout the United States and to a 
certain extent to foreign lands. They will illus- 
trate the progress of Southern California as an edu- 
cational center in particular. 

The Chamber of Commerce will throw open its 
doors for the entertainment of all visitors who call 
at its headquarters. Practically every other Cham- 
ber of Commerce in Southern California, as well 
as many from other sections of the state, will have 
booths in the basement of the Auditorium, from 
which literature descriptive of the abounding re- 



Pacific Outlook 



f the various secti endid 

empire will be distributi 

rapidly becoming distinguished 
f the greatest convention cities in the 
United States. This is due in part to the magnifi- 
cent climate and resources of the region of which 
it is the commercial and industrial center, but 

chiefly because of the energy and enl I its 

inhabitants. The best friends Los Angeles makes 
lably are those whose friendship is attained 
through the medium of some great national con- 
vention, like that of the \". E. A. or the Shriners. 
And it may not be out •<! place at this time to re- 
mark that it has been the Source of surprise I" 

many oi the less consequential people of the city 

why a determined effort has not been made to se- 
cure one or both of the great political conventions 
of 190S for this city. 

\Ye should extend to the visiting teachers a sin- 
cere "glad band" — not the hand that rests most of 
the time on the pocket book. All designs upon their 
capital should be abandoned. School teachers, as 
a rule, are not members of the capitalistic class, and 
few of them have money to invest in real estate, in 
manufactories and other enterprises seeking an in- 
vestor. But if these visitors be treated more as 
the citizens of Los Angeles, individually, would 
treat guests especially invited to their homes for a 
season of entertainment, all thoughts of reaping 
pecuniary reward as the result of their call upon 
us being forgotten for the nonce, they will be found 
to be among the best "boosters" that have ever 
come, seen and been conquered by this glorious 
metropolis of the Southwest. 



Indian Convention 

Some excellent philosophy is being discoursed in 
the conference of Indian educators. Dr. Moore has 
said that there is no God-given superiority of race, 
that Anglo-Saxondom has much to learn from In- 
dian customs, Indian history and Indian art. Com- 
missioner Leupp emphasises and expands the same 
theme. He'refers to the vaunted civilization of the 
Caucasian, and deprecates its vain notion that 
everything must be brought into line with itself. 
"We cannot standardize humanity!" be exclaims. 
"It is flat heresy to try to make over the Indian into 
a white man. You might make a jelly fish that 
way; you cannot make a man. Improve him as an 
Indian. Stimulate his proper pride of race. So, in 
that cosmopolitan mosaic which we call American- 
ism, the Indian people will be justly honored, and 
Indian art will be sought by collectors equally with 
Japanese screens and Persian rugs." 

One of the speakers ascribed to Los Angeles the 
merit of being the first section of the United States 
to deal with the Indian question in a humane. Chris- 
tian and scientific spirit. This fair city may be 
congratulated on such distinction: for, just as fat- 
as she has gained it, she has led the whole world 
toward higher realms of ideal and practice. 



Famous Fighter in Attendance 
Miss Margaret A. Haley, who has come to Los 
Angeles to attend the National Educational Asso- 
ciation convention, is one of the best fighters and 
best organizers in the United Stales. As president 
of the Chicago Federation of Teachers, she has led 
her organization to many a victorv which has de- 



manded courage," resourcefulness and. above all. 
patience. She has bravely protested against political 
injustice, salary discriminations and numerous 
forms of oppression. Miss Haley is a teacher in the 

-ixtli grade of one of the * liicago schools. She will 
be a leader in the opposition to the new N. !•'.. A. 
constitution when it comes up for adoption. This 
constitution is said t" give the balance oi power 1" 
the superintendents and principals of schools. The 
teachers arc not in favor of relinquishing their in- 
fluence and it is expected that there will be a session 
of tense interest when the objectionable clauses are 
read. 

Might Enlighten Them 

Hector Alliot, whose revelations concerning the 
conditions of the Moki Indians have caused a na- 
tional sensation, occupied a unique position this 
week among educators assembled at the sessions 
of the Indian schools branch of the National Educa- 
tional Association. Someone, who did not under- 




Dr. W. T. Harris 

Former U. S. Commissioner of Education 

stand just how Mr. Alliot had been interested in 
the cause of Indian education, gave him a badge 
and he was one of the most intelligent listeners to 
the speeches and reports. No one in California is 
better fitted to draw conclusions concerning the ad- 
ministration of Indian affairs than the well-known 
art critic, who has passed many years in gathering 
data relating to the American aborigines. He has 
studied the folk lore and the habits of almost all the 
North American tribes and it was a happy thought 
of the editor of the Examiner to send him on the 
mission of investigation. No one could be less pre- 
judiced or more fair. What he told in a recent 
scries of articles constitutes a record that should 
make the United States government ashamed 
enough to take immediate action toward ameliorat- 
ing the condition of the unfortunate Indians. The 
expose was well timed, as it came when those who 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



are helping to expend the millions wasted annually 
in the cause of Indian education have a chance to 
take notice and to explain. James R. Garfield, 
F'ancis Leupp and Miss Estelle Reel can learn 
much in Mr. Alliot's articles. The sort of education 
that reveals to a Moki girl all the advantages of 
civilization and trains her to enjoy the comforts of 
a well-ordered home only to return her to the hor- 
rors of an existence in a Moki village is worse than 
wasted. It is torture of the most terrible type. Mr. 
Alliot should be given a chance to speak before the 
government employes who are paid big salaries for 
educating poor Lo. 



Noted New Zealand Woman 

iNIiss Wilhelmina Sheriff Bain, essayist, traveler 
and lecturer, of Taranaki, New Zealand, has been 
passing several months in Los Angeles and Pasa- 
dena, where she has been studying the social con- 
ditions, politics and characteristics of Americans. 
Miss Bain is a modest little woman upon whom 
her country has bestowed many honors, even though 




Dr. Nathan C. Schaeffer 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Pennsylvania 

she has the courage of her convictions on all sub- 
jects and does not hesitate to uttei a rebuke when 
she thinks it is merited. At the time of the Boer 
war it was her voice alone that uttered a protest 
against her country's effort to crush out indepen- 
dence in the Transvaal and she was made to feel 
the unpopularity of her sentiments in many slights 
difficult for a sensitive woman to endure. But her 
time of severe discipline was brief and she came into 
her own place after the bitterness of the contest had 
passed away. Miss Bain was president of the Can- 
terbury Women's Institute in Cbristchurch, the 
chief city of Canterbury, once a province of New 
Zealand. With this organization were affiliated 



many clubs and the power of the institution is far 
reaching in the colony. 

Equal suffrage has been in operation in New Zea- 
land for thirty years, but, by an error in the word- 
ing of the measure, representation was not provided 
for in connection with the right of suffrage and 
women cannot sit in the parliament. In New Zea- 
land the mixed clubs are popular. Men and women 
discuss public questions in associations that are 
maintained for the study of topics of national im- 
portance. Some of the clubs are radical and many 
have a socialistic tendency. The Canterbury 
Women's Institute is really a reform club devoted 
to the interests of women and children. Through 
a movement in which it took the initiative a national 
council of women has been established. Miss Bain 
went as a delegate from New Zealand to the Berlin 
International Council of Women which met in June 
1904. She spoke before the council, at which, our 
own Susan B. Anthony and other prominent women 
received such distinguished attentions, on "Peace 
and Arbitration" and "Education." Miss Bain rep- 
resented her country again at the international 
peace meeting in Boston in 1904. She is a long- 
time friend of Mrs. May Wright Sewall and passed 
several weeks as a visitor at Mrs. Sewall's home. 



(.Miss Wilhelmjna Sheriff Bain, who came to the United 
States from her home in Taranaki, New Zealand, in 
August, 1906, and has spent the interim in studying the 
social and political conditions and the characteristics of 
Americans, will attend the sessions of the National Edu- 
cational Association as the representative of the Pacific 
Outlook, and in the issues of July 13- and 20 will give the 
results of her observations.) 

* * * 



Pragmatism 

Several weeks ago when Dr. Dorothea Moore, in 
addressing the members of the Friday Morning 
Club, talked about "pragmatism," the members 
tried to look as if they used the word every day. 
But of course they did not. Originally "pragma- 
tism" meant familiarity with civil or public affairs, 
and in the philosophy of Kant it stands for the con- 
sideration of historical phenomena with special re- 
ference to their causes, antecedent conditions and 
results. Although George Eliot and other English 
novelists employed the word as a synonym for of- 
ficiousness or busy impertinence, it has again come 
into its right value and Professor William James 
has used it as the title of his latest book. The full 
title of the work is "Pragmatism : a New Name for 
Some Old Ways of Thinking." 

"Pragmatism," according to the author, "un- 
stiffens our opposition everywhere and should help 
reconcile thinkers." He shows how what we call 
common sense may have resulted from a series of 
discoveries by prehistoric thinkers. He follows this 
by an explanation of what men mean by truth and 
demonstrates that all our truths contain human con- 
tributions, which at this date it is impossible to 
disentangle from the purely "objective" elements in 
them. He compares the pantheistic with the theistic 
type of religion and concludes that the latter is more 
pragmatistic. The book is said to be free from 
technical terms and expressions which would make 
it incomprehensible to those who have not made a 
study of philosophy. 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 



What It Was, and What It W a s Not 



(l-'roiii tbe PftOlflo Outlook of Juno 15, l927j 



Bv William K. STEWART, Pormeb.LV Editor of the Times Magazine, (New York) 



In looking through the tiles of the Pacific Outlook 

of twenty rears ago the writer came upon an article 
I in the number for June 15. 1907) by \Y. E. Brown 
..11 Christian Science, that strange pseudo-religion 
which for a period of about a quarter of a century 
held so dominating a place among the queer beliefs 
of mankind. The title, "Christian Science: What It 
Is, and What It Is Not," attracted the writer's at- 
tention as being likely to give, in small space, an 
intelligible definition of the cult — something which 
the more elaborate writings of Christian Scientists, 
by their confusion of thought and ambiguity of 
statement, always failed to do. 

The writer was disappointed. Nothing in the 
article afforded any clearer exposition than other 
accounts which he had previously read. 

Although Christian Science has now "passed on" 
and taken its place along with the records of the be- 
lievers in the inspiration of Mother Shipton, the 
Second-Day Adventists, and the score of fantastic 
cult-doctrines which contribute to the studies of 
contemporary psychologists, it may not be uninter- 
esting, even at this length of time, to glance back 
at some of the tenets of this half-baked and warmed- 
over philosophy. 

It is a commentary on the superficial reading 
which was possessed by Christian Science writers 
that the writer of the article under review makes 
this statement : 

"It is a self-evident fact that mind and matter as 
opposing entities could not exist, and since Mrs. 
Eddy has given forth her discovery of the allness 
of mind, many natural scientists have changed their 
views regarding matter and agree with her that 
we live in a thought world and that matter does 
not exist." 

That mind and matter exist as opposing entities 
never, of course, was proclaimed by anyone, and in 
making his statement Mr. Brown performed the 
quite useless feat of setting up a fictitious opponent 
and then knocking him down. The peculiarly pre- 
sumptuous and impertinent part of the extract 
quoted, however, lies in the assertion that Mrs. 
Eddy has given forth a discovery of the allness of 
mind. Every well-read person knows that, to leave 
out the ancient and mediaeval philosophers and to 
consider here only those classed as modern, Spinoza 
and Leibnitz more than two hundred years ago pro- 
claimed that substance, by which they meant God, 
was everything and that all else in the universe 
was simply attributes of the substance and modes 
and force. JMalebranche and Locke, who lived in 
the 1600's, both spiritualized substance. 

But the philosopher from whom the 1 whole Chris- 
tian Science system — the cult of Quimby and his 
successor, Mrs. Eddy — was derived was George 
Berkeley, who wrote about 1700. The "allness of 
mind" never was more loudly proclaimed by Mrs. 
Eddy than it had been bv Berkeley two hundred 



years earlier. Berkeley, as we know, held that there 
is no difference between things and our ideas of 
things; that the words "sensible things" and "idea" 
are synonymous. He said: "Insofar as mind per- 
ceives ideas it produces things ; and these are not 
two distinct operations ; to perceive signifies to pro- 
duce, and the ideas are the things themselves." 

Berkeley was quite as positive about this as could 
be any Mrs. Eddy. He preached in a straightfor- 
ward manner that the existence of matter is an illu- 
sion ; that time is nothing, abstracted from the suc- 
cession of ideas in our minds ; that space cannot 
exist without the mind; that minds alone exist; and 
that these perceive ideas either by themselves or 
through the action of the all-powerful spirit on 
which they depend. 

Berkeley taught that the sun, moon and trees ex- 
ist only when they are perceived and are annihilat- 
ed when we no longer perceive them. Could Chris- 
tian Science have gone further? Berkeley tried to 
overcome criticism of this negation of matter by say- 
ing that if our mind cannot perceive them another 
spirit can perecive them, or continue their exist- 
ence, so to speak; for though he denies the objective 
existence of bodies he assumes a plurality of 
spiritual beings. 

That, so far as we can see, is exactly the doctrine 
— at least in the main — of the Christian Scientists. 
As was asked of Berkeley so it might have been 
asked of the latter : What, on that theory, becomes 
of the vegetable and animal kingdoms? If it be 
true that, unperceiving and unperceived things do 
not exist, what becomes of the soul in deep sleep? 
If the picture opposite to my bed exists only be- 
cause I see it, -what minds perceive it after I have 
g'one to sleep, and thus hinder it from ceasing to 
exist? How shall we picture to ourselves a plural- 
ity of human individuals, if space exists in the mind 
only? How, moreover, does the creative spirit pro- 
duce sensible minds in us? The deus ex machina 
explains nothing. 

I have dwelt at some length on the false Chris- 
tian Science claim to "discovery," because it virtu- 
ally was the only claim put forward by Christian 
Science writers which is susceptible of such dis- 
proof as to admit of no answer. Attacked on mere- 
ly controversial grounds, as to the reasonableness 
of their religion or to the curing of disease, Chris- 
tion Scientists always took refuge in a mass of- 
obiter dicta and an appeal to the testimony of their 
own followers. On grounds like these, satisfactory 
discussion was. of course, impossible. 

Carried to its logical conclusion the basic reason- 
ing of Christian Scientists ends in pantheistic ideal- 
ism — the all-pervasiveness of the divine mind. But 
as pantheism, by excluding the human sense of im- 
perfection, would destroy the Christian Science 
hypothesis of good and evil, of God-perfection and 
human-error, it is discarded at a jump, and a dis- 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



tinction made between the divine mind and the 
mortal mind. 

This is done with about as much reason as might 
apply to the act of setting down a row of figures- 
say, 2 and 2 and 2, and because the addition makes 
6, and because 7 is wanted, saying that 2 and'2 and 
2 makes 7. . . 

It is not necessary to say that this flaw in Chris- 
tion Science logic was due to the mercenary motives 
of the leaders of thecult, whose principal desire was 
the accumulation of riches through the prac- 
tice of their "cures," and who knew that if they pro- 
claimed that the divine was the only Mind, even the 
shallowest of thinkers would be constrained to ask 
how it came that the divine — the perfect and all- 
sufficient — Mind could manifest itself in error, sin, ■ 
disease and death. It is important only to point out 
the fact of the disharmony of the Christian Science 
hypothesis and the Christian Science system. 

Three general statements may be extracted from 
Mr. Brown's article as being typical of the claims 
made by Christian Scientists. The contradictions 
which these statements involve are illustrative of 
the shallowness of thought which characterized 
Christian Science, writers twenty years ago. 

"Christian Science," writes this author in the Pa- 
cific Outlook, "is a religion, the religion of Jesus 
Christ. Furthermore, Christian Scientists do not 
use a different. Bible, but use the same dear old 
Book that our forefathers have used as their 
spiritual guide. The textbook of Christian Science, 
'Science and Health, with Key to the Scriptures,' is 
used as a commentary in connection with the Bible, 
and does not in any way displace the Book of 
Books." 

This being so, the question naturally rises, 
Wherein is the book of Genesis, or, indeed, any of 
the Old Testament, consistent with the theory of 
the non-existence of matter which constitutes the 
essence of Christian Science? The Bible tells us 
that God created the world — man, the animal king- 
dom at large, the vegetable kingdom, etc. If it is 
true that God created these things, then they must 
have a real existence as things-in-themselves, not 
as the manifestations of human thought. The en- 
tire Old Testament is a philosophy of materialism ; 
and the New Testament preaches a dualism in 
which matter has its very distinct place. 

Moreover, the reality of sin, which Christian 
Science denies, is distinctly proclaimed by the Bible. 
That there is no man without sin is a biblical state- 
ment, and Christ by his very act of Atonement ad- 
mitted the existence of sin. How could Christian 
Science both agree with the Bible and disagree with 
it? But these palpable contradictions worried the 
disciples of Mrs. Eddy not at all. Th rank and 
file of the cult, shallow thinkers, did not perceive 
them, while the leaders were content with the broad 
enunciation of theories necessary to the commercial 
exploitation of the "religion." 

In regard to the cure of disease, this writer says : 

"Christian Science does not employ the human 
mind at all in its work, but depends entirely on the 
divine mind in its destruction of evil and disease. 
The human mind is not only of no service in Chris- 
tian Science., but is positively a hindrance, and must 
be displaced by. the divine mind before results can 
be obtained." 

And yet Christian Science had its "healers," who 



were a sort of irregular practitioners, charging stated 
fees for their work, and through whom — through 
whose human minds — the cures were supposed to 
be effected. If only the divine mind were of ser- 
vice, the human mind being a "positive hindrance," 
how could the "healers" justify their practice? It 
might also be pertinently asked, If all is mind, 
wherein does mind differ in itself; how can one in- 
dividual have a different kind of mind from an- 
other's? 

In concluding his article Mr. Brown says : 
"It has been truly said that no one opposes Chris- 
tian Science, but rather what they think Christian 
Science is." 

The argument is peculiarly specious. To assert 
that in order to understand Christian Science one 
must be a professed believer in its tenets is akin to 
holding that in order to have an opinion on the 
ethics of eating human flesh one must be a cannibal. 

* * * 

Francis Murphy-an Estimate 

The death of Francis Murphy removes from the 
world of work one of the most truly philanthropic 
men who has ever labored for the good of humanity. 
For more than three decades Mr. Murphy toiled 
incessantly for the uplifting of those whom intem- 
perance had degraded from their right rank in the 
great army of progress. His, method of reclaiming 
the derelicts was so simple and so-old-fashioned that 
often his superb achievements were undervalued. 
Love was his watchword. With the ideal of uni- 
versal brotherhood before him, he preached faith in 
God. Making appeal to the divinity in man he was 
able to inspire the unfortunate to effort toward a 
rehabilitation that was permanent. Among the 
thousands who have obeyed the call to altruistic 
service the sturdy figure of the white-haired man 
stood forth alone. His was an independent effort 
that became an endless chain of good influence. In 
every large city of the United States he will be 
mourned with the affectionate memory that is in- 
spired by few who make the little journey through 
the world. Everywhere in the United States are to 
be found men and women who owe to him debts of 
gratitude for useful years that followed after the 
trumpet call of the temperance apostle had been 
heard. Mr. Murphy passed out of a life made beau- 
tiful by the highest usefulness, the most superb 
unselfishness and the most unchangeable optimism. 

* * * 

Tree That Really "Weeps 

Among the historical curiosities to be seen at 
Chatsworth House, the residence of the Duke of 
Devonshire, is a willow tree that weeps, very often 
to the personal discomfort of those beneath it. 

To the casual observer it appears just an ordin- 
ary willow, but on closer inspection it is seen to be 
artfully artificial. It is made from a metal to close- 
ly resemble a living tree, and each of its branches 
is covered with innumerable holes. In fact, the 
whole tree is a monster syringe, being connected 
to a water main near by. 

The key for turning on and off is close at hand, 
and many a visiting party has been enticed beneath 
its branches by practical jokers. — Tit-Bits. 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



-4 



CAPITAL, WAGES AND THE TARIFF 



Profits on Capital -Are the 

(Cont 

Whatever we may think of Henry George's prop- 
osition to eliminate private ownership of land 
through levying a tax upon it. just equal to its 
rental value, we cannot ei with his conclu- 

sion that under normal conditions land values are 
entirely due to the growth of population, and that 
the people themselves, through their tendency to 
increase in numbers, have created the value in land 
on which they are compelled to pay a profit in the 
shape of rentals to the individual owners. There 
may he no way to prevent this increased value going 
to the individuals who own the land without affect- 
ing the productiveness of land to such an extent as 
to make the condition of the people worse when the 
necessity for paying rents had ceased than they are 
under the present conditions, and this probably 
would be the result, for the reason that if George's 
single tax idea were adopted no one would have any 
particular interest in maintaining or increasing the 
fertility and productiveness of the land. 

But because destroying individual ownership of 
land would be unwise is no reason why measures 
should be advocated or laws exist which have the 
effect of artificially increasing the rental value of 
lands. That portion of the aggregate production of 
wealth which is taken by land owners as rental for 
the use of the land is, and must always remain, a 
burden upon those engaged in the production of 
wealth, and anything which tends to enhance land 
values must have the effect of imposing an addi- 
tional burden upon labor and capital productively 
employed. For this reason discriminatory railroad 
rates in favor of large centers of population and the 
consequent increase in land values in these centers 
is compelling the people of the whole country to pay 
a larger amount in the shape of rentals to the 
owners of lands at the points enjoying the lower 
freight rate than they would have to pay if the 
land had not been artificially increased in value. 
The same thing is true of lands the value of which 
has been increased through the operation of the 
protective tariff. The increased rent is a burden 
imposed upon the whole people for the benefit of the 
individual owning the land. 

There is a tendency all over the world for profits 
to equalize, and as profits are always represented 
by that share of the aggregate production of the 
combined efforts of labor and capital, not divided 
as wages, profits will either increase or diminish, 
depending on whether the whole amount of capital 
invested and seeking investment is increasing more 
rapidly than the whole amount of labor employed 
and seeking employment; that is, with capital in- 
creasing more rapidly than labor, rates of profit 
might not actually be forced down, because at the 
same time the efforts of capital and labor might be 
so employed or directed as to increase the aggregate 
production to a point greater in proportion than the 
increased amount of labor and capital employed. It 
would, however, result in a division of the aggregate 
production which would give capital a smaller pro- 
portion than it had been receiving. This smaller 
proportion of an increased production might repre- 
sent the same or even a higher rate of profit. And 



Wages of Stored-up Labor" 

imieil ) 

whether the rate .if profit fell or not, wages would 

increase for the reason that labor would be receiv- 
ing a larger proportion of an increased production. 
On the other hand, the rate of profit might not in- 
crease if the whole- amount of capital to be invested 
were increasing more slowly than the whole amount 
of labor employed or seeking employment. 

If the aggregate production were smaller in pro- 
portion to the whole amount of capital and labor 
employed, the result under .this condition might be 
a stationary or even a declining rate of profit. It 
would simply mean that capital would receive a 
larger proportion of what the united efforts of capi- 
tal and labor were producing than it had been re- 
ceiving. It goes without saying that wages would 
be lower than they had been for the reason that 
labor would be receiving a smaller proportion of a 
reduced production. 

To sum up, the value of the money in use depends 
on, and is determined by, the cost of the material of 
which money is made. The rate of profit at any 
given time is controlled by the amount of capital in 
existence in proportion to the amount of labor. The 
rate of interest must always tend towards the rate 
of profit, sometimes being higher and sometimes 
being lower, but always being forced to a point 
where it will approximate the earning power of 
capital used for productive purpose ; and wages 
everywhere are high or low, depending on whether 
the aggregate production is great or small as com- 
pared with the whole number of laborers employed. 
This, because to secure the assistance of capital, 
labor in one part of the world must permit it to 
take for itself as great a reward as it could secure 
for its service anywhere else, so that the difference 
in wages in different countries must be based upon 
and represent the actual difference in the produc- 
tiveness of labor in these countries. 

Now while these are the tendencies they are being 
continually interfered with and their operation in- 
terupted, through the attempts of combinations of 
capital and labor to secure a monopoly of what they 
have to sell. Whenever a fight is being waged with 
the object in view of securing a monopoly, it nearly 
always results in an enormous waste of both capital 
and labor, and so tends to enhance profits and de- 
crease wages: for to create new wealth or capital, 
the employment of both labor and capital is neces- 
sary, and anything that interrupts or interferes with 
the steady and regular employment of these two 
factors in production must have the effect of pre- 
venting as rapid an increase in the amount of capital 
in existence as would take place if the steady em- 
ployment of capital and labor w-ere not interfered 
with. As the growth of population — which means 
an increase in the number of laborers — would con- 
tinue steadily during the period such interruption 
or interference lasted, it could have no other effect 
than to make the amount of capital smaller in pro- 
portion to the amount of labor employed or seeking 
employment. In consequence of this, labor would 
receive a smaller proportion of wdnat labor and capi- 
tal were producing. 'While a labor organization 
sometimes obtains such a complete monopoly of the 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



kind of labor it has to sell as to succeed in raising 
the wages of its members above what they would 
receive if no such organization existed, it simply 
means that they have taken from the wages re- 
reived by others having a different kind of labor to 
sell just to the extent that, through monopoly, they 
have added to their own. 

If the aggregate production has been neither in- 
creased nor diminished, the aggregate amount paid 
in wages would be the same as if such labor union 
had not been formed. If union laborers have suc- 
ceeded in forcing their own wages to a point above 
what they would be receiving under normal com- 
petitive conditions, they have simply succeeded in 
changing the distribution of wages, taking more for 
themselves and leaving less for their fellow-workers. 
But if, as usually happens, their complete control 
•of one form or kind of labor is used for the purpose 
of curtailing or restricting the amount which their 
labor will produce, the net result of their efforts (so 
far as it affects labor as a whole) is to reduce the 
average wages received by the workers ; for by re- 
ducing the productiveness of their own labor, they 
have just to the same extent reduced the aggregate 
amount of wealth produced, and so have diminished 
the amount to be divided as wages among all wage- 
earners. If the aggregate amount paid in wages is 
less, then the average wages paid to the individual 
worker cannot be so great. 

The onlv way in which wages can really be in- 
creased is through an increase in the productiveness 
of labor itself — not only because of the reason al- 
ready pointed out, but also because the more capital 
there is to assist labor in producing, the more pro- 
ductive labor will be, and the smaller the reward of 
capital will be in proportion to the amount em- 
ployed ; and because the more productive labor is, 
the more rapidly capital will accumulate. 

In fact, with increasing population wages would 
have to fall if it were not for the introduction of 
new capital and new methods resulting in an in- 
creased production for labor, for the reason that 
with increasing population it becomes necessary to 
employ poorer natural advantages. With a small 
population, the very best natural advantages only 
have to be used, such as the most productive land 
for agriculture, the most accessible coal, iron and 
other mineral lands where the least amount of labor 
is necessary to produce the things required. As 
population grew the increased supply needed to 
meet the wants of a larger number of people would 
make it necessary to resort to lands of all kinds, 
which would yield a smaller production in propor- 
tion to the labor expended. Because of this, wages 
would have to fall if it were not for the introduction 
of better methods and the assistance of a greater 
amount of capital in proportion to labor employed. 

To illustrate : In a new, sparsely-settled com- 
munity it may be assumed there is enough of the 
very best grade of land to afford employment for 
all the labor engaged in productive work. No one 
under this condition would make use of any but the 
very best land. But as the community grew in 
numbers there would come a time when the best- 
lands would be incapable of furnishing employment 
for all labor employed productively, and when this 
time arrived it would be necessary for some of the 
labor to employ itself working a poorer grade of 
land. 

Now. considering labor in this community as a 



The L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



("Writing in SigHt) 




Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue Free 

L. CEL M. Alexander <©. Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 

131 South Broadway. Los Angeles, Gal. 
Phones Home 1906-Main 5959 




BETWEEN 



..California^ East.. 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 



'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at GOt South Spring St. 




Arizona Turquoise Mines Co. 

CAN SHOW YOU THE LARGEST 
VARIETY OF COLORING IN TUR- 
QUOISE—THE ONLY STONE THAT 
IS HARD ENOUGH TO WEAR. 

Cutting Works and Sales Room 

450/2 SOUTH BROADWAY 

Wholesale and Retail 



BOOKSBOUGHT 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN ia55 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



whole, the natural advantages existing for its em- 
ployment arc not - .is the) formerly were, 
and tin- result would have to be a smaller production 
in proportion to the number of labon iloyed, 

if better artificial advantages liail not been intro- 
duced, such as the construction of better roads, 
mills, etc., and the introduction ol better or more 
machinery. Then, too, land used For agricultural 

purposes may be artificially fertilized and made 
more productive, but this additional productiveness 
should be regarded just as much due to the invest- 
ment of capital as the greater productiveness re- 
sulting from the introduction of better or nunc ma- 
chinery. Every artificial means used for the purpose 
of making labor more productive (which we call 
capital) is simply labor saved up or stored, and 
represents surplus labor of the past, after the needs 
and wants and desires of the people have been sup- 
plied. Anything which it has taken labor to create 
and is afterwards used to assist labor in the produc- 
tion of more wealth, is capital. This is just as true 
of a hoe or spade, as it is of the most complicated 
and expensive machinery ever constructed. The 
difference is only in degree, so that when we speak 
of profits on capital, it might be said to mean the 
wages of stored up labor. 

Now regarding capital as simply stored up labor, 
or labor saved from the past, it must become appar- 
ent that the more productive labor is, the larger sur- 
plus there will be to be put into the form of capital 
and to employ in the future to assist labor in its 
efforts ; and as the productiveness of labor depends 
very largely on the amount of capital there is to 
work with it, it might be said the wages paid next 
year are determined to a considerable extent by the 
productiveness of the labor employed this year. 

This is true notwithstanding the general impres- 
sion that increased wages follow a period of low 
production. If, for instance, a period of low pro- 
duction, one in which capital was decreasing, should 
continue long enough, the time would arrive when 
capital had entirely disappeared and the people 
would be living in a state of savagery — more com- 
plete than that of any people now in existence, for 
there are no people now living who do not employ 
instruments of some sort to assist them in securing 
the things needed or desired by them. The Bush- 
man of Australia — the lowest type of man now on 
earth 1 — uses capital to assist him, in the shape of 
the crude instruments employed by him in his pur- 
suit of food, and without the assistance of these in- 
struments — capital — his existence would be even 
more precarious than it is now. 

The foregoing statements in regard to capital are 
practically the same as those used by all political 
economists. They are used here only for the pur- 
pose of establishing the principle that anything 
which has the effect of reducing the current output 
of labor must also have the effect of reducing the 
future productiveness of labor ; for there is no way 
in which the amount of capital employed productive- 
ly may be increased during a period when the con- 
sumption is as great or greater than the production. 
It sometimes happens in a country that the people 
have been forced to economize during a period when 
they are only partially employed, and they will de- 
part only gradually from the economical manner of 
living when industrial conditions have so improved 
as to employ them fully again. And with a nation 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamentalWood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach BotK 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want the BEST 



af jr> 



KODAK 

...GO TO... 



FINISHING 



PIERCE ®> CO. 



127 W. 6th St 



mo:n E Y 



Diamonds Bought, and Sold 

If you have any kind of collateral that you wish to -raise money 
on, call at 316 S. BROADWAY. Phone 4322 

MARKWELL & CO. 



Pacific Outlook 



or with the whole world, as it is with regard to the 
individual, it is becoming richer only when it is 
producing more than it is consuming. 

The production of surplus wealth in any one 
country must eventually have the effect of bettering 
the conditions under which the people of other 
countries live and work. It makes no difference 
where the surplus is produced, it will seek employ- 
ment as capital in that part of the world offering 
it the largest reward for its service. If we take 
England as an example of this, we find that a large 
proportion of the surplus wealth produced there has 
for a long time been taken, in the form of capital, 
to other countries and used there to assist labor and 
make it more productive. No country has ever been 
or ever will be able to retain for itself the exclusive 
advantage of a surplus production of wealth. The 
natural law which compels it to share this. advant- 
age with other countries of the world is as im- 
mutable and positive in its operation as the law ot 
gravity. The conditions in each country are 
actively competing for capital with the conditions 
existing in every other country of the world. 

The same thing that is true in regard to condi- 
tions everywhere competing for capital is also true 
with reference to labor, the tendency always being 
to equalize the profits everywhere through a dis- 
tribution of capital and also to equalize wages paid 
— wages always being based on the productiveness 
of labor. In the United States a large proportion 
of surplus capital is seeking employment in other 
countries on terms extremely unfavorable to itself. 
Almost all products manufactured in the United 
States (as well as a large part of our agricultural 
products) being disposed of in other countries are 
sold there at a much lower price than the users of 
these things in the United States are compelled to 
pay for them. This simply means that labor in other 
countries is securing the assistance of American- 
produced capital on more favorable terms than is 
labor in the United States! 

If a steam engine built in the United States and 
designed to assist labor sells here for $10,000, and 
the same engine produced in the United States sells 
for $5,000 in some other country, it follows that here 
the engine represents in capital $10,000, while there 
it represents but $5,000, and labor here to secure the 
assistance of this engine must pay to the owner a 
profit on $10,000, and labor in the country where it 
has been cold, for $5,000 pays to the man who owns 
the engine a profit on only $5,000.' This is not be- 
cause capital does not receive as great a reward in 
the other country as here, but because the engine 
exchanges for a smaller amount of some other form 
of wealth "there than here; and if the American 
manufacturers of machinery controlling the markets 
of this country, as they do, through the operation 
of the protective tariff, and discrimination in trans- 
portation rates, sell machinery used for pro- 
ductive purposes in some other country for 
fifty per cent of the price at which they sell the same 
machinery used in this country brings the result 
(assuming- the rate of profits to be the same in the 
two countries) that labor using the machinery in 
the other country would be compelled to allow the 
owners of this machinery to take or withhold as 
their profit just one half as large a proportion of 
the aggregate production as the owners of the same 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at, Reduced 
Rates - - - - 

140 S. BROADWAY 

Main 1 9 Get, a City Map Free Home Ex. 1 9 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



INCUBATORS AND BROODERS 

Poultry Supplies, Seeds, Garden Tools, Lawn Mowers, Etc. 

Pacific Incubator Co. 
707 South Spring "St. ph °" es 1 f 7085 "' 




When you read in the PACIFIC 
OUTLOOK the advertisement of 
some merchant, just remember that 
Mr. Merchant has paid well for the 
space to convince you that his 
goods are the best. 

If by persistent advertising the 
merchant is successful in gaining 
your confidence and in interesting 
you in his store and in the goods 
he sells, and 'if you find you want 
or need the goods he advertises 
andi decide to buy, it is your duty 
to buy of him. 

The element of truth, the con- 
viction in the merchant's adver- 
tisement, must have convinced you 
that the goods he advertises are 
suited to your needs. 

BUY ADVERTISED GOODS 
BUY OF THE ADVERTISER 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



mt ;in<l kind of machinery in the United Si 

in the shape of profits, 
iv if tin* were a statement of what might hap- 

very likely that it wouul be generally re- 
3 theorizing and unworthy of serious con- 

; but the fact is that the system or condi- 
is actually in operation, and it is hard 

•. anyone not having a selfish interest'in 
maintaining the conditions as they arc can advocate 
the retention or continuation of tariff laws which 
have resulted in such an unfair discrimination 
against the very labor which is giving its foreign 
competitors cheaper capital to aid them in their 
wi >rk. 

This question has nothing to do with money 
wages paid here and elsewhere. It simply means 
that the high tariff levied upon foreign goods im- 
ported into this country is enabling capital invested 
here in certain industries to take for itself a much 
larger portion of the aggregate production than it 
would be possible for it to secure if foreign pro- 
duced articles were allowed to compete here on 
ecpial terms. Even at the high price prevailing in 
this country for manufactured articles of almost all 
kinds, the consumer of these products is often com- 
pelled to wait a long time to have an order filled, 
and the manufacturer explains the delay on the 
ground of an excessive demand — a demand so great 
as to be beyond his ability to supply it promptly. 
This same manufacturer may have agents all over 
the world eagerly seeking markets for the same 
articles the American consumer is waiting for, at a 
price sometimes as much as fifty per cent below the 
one established and maintained here. 

If these things are true (and no well-informed 
man will attempt to deny them) the man who ad- 
vocates a continuance of the conditions under which 
we are now employing ourselves is either dishonest 
or mistaken. It is fair to assume the American manu- 
facturer does not sell goods in another country for 
a price very much under what the same thing could 
be secured for from some one else, and it must fol- 
low that if the tariff on the articles in question were 
removed it would force the price down to about the 
same figure in this country. 

It has been said that when the American price for 
American-produced steel rails was established at 
$28 per ton by those engaged in producing them, 
the price for export was fixed at $18 per ton and 
Mr. Carnegie made the statement that there was $5 
per ton profit on the rails sold for export. This 
statement shows that it cost $13 per ton to produce 
the rails. Now if the price as given in the American 
and in the foreign market is not correct, and if the 
difference in the selling price here and there is only 
one dollar per ton instead of ten dollars per ton, the 
principle involved would in no way be affected — the 
difference would be only in degree. 

What was and is true in regard to steel rails is 
equally true in regard to almost everything else 
made of iron and steel. Let us take the case of 
railroad construction in the United States, where 
the American price is paid for everything used in 
building and operating it, and that of a railroad built 
in some other country, where the export price, prob- 
ably forty per cent less, is paid for everything enter- 
ing into the building and operation of the railroad. 
Everything else being equal, the cost of carrying 
goods on the railroad built and being operated in the 



PONY RIGS 



A SPECIALTY 
WITH US 




STUDEBAKER AGENCY 

■WAGONS CARRIAGES IMPLEMENTS 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 



200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



PHONE HOME A 4432 

4TH ST. STORE 



F 7671; MAIN 4604 
SPRING St. store 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST. 



BULUNG'S METHOD OF MUNICH (or the treatment of diseases of the 
air passages-CATARRH. BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our Inhalatorium should be made bs all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical professionisespeciallyinvited. Send for booklet 



409 Pacific Electric Bldg". 



Phone F-1467 



r 



Resumes 
Business 



T <MjL 



-m Business ^ 

onradi 



Jewelry Company 



E,legant new stocK of Diamonds, Jewelry 
and Watches 

S. CONRADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles, Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



other country must be very much less than the cost 
of carrying goods on the American road, and yet the 
material entering into the construction and opera- 
tion of 'both roads is produced by the same labor, 
assisted by the same capital, the actual cost of 
production being the same. 

* * * 

Secretary Taft's Sister 

When Dr. and Mrs. William A. Edwards came 
to Los Angeles to live they found many old friends 
who gave them hearty welcome, and when it be- 
came known that the 'aristocratic woman of modest 
bearing and fine intelligence is the sister of Secre- 
tary Taft, society was especially interested. Mrs. 
Edwards has prefered the old friends, however, and 
has not accepted all the invitations showered upon 
her. It will be remembered that her father, Al- 
phonso Taft, was attorney-general of the United 
States from 1876 to 1878. In Cincinnati, the long-' 
time home of the Tafts, the family has enjoyed 
many distinctions. All the members have revealed 
extraordinary mentality. The fact that Mrs. Ed- 
wards's brother is now lookd upon as a possible 
successor to President Roosevelt does not surprise 
Ohioans. To them the presidency must be con- 
sidered as merely a natural step in the career of a 
man who from boyhood has revealed remarkable 
powers. Since he was graduated second in a class 
of 121 at Yale, Mr. Taft has contradicted the old 
adage that an honor man is never heard of after he 
leaves college. It has been rumored that the sec- 
retary of war will visit his sister in Los Angeles 
some time before the busy season begins in Wash- 
ington. 

* * * 

"Why Dr. WHeeler Won't Leave 
When Dr. Benjamin Ide Wheeler visited New 
York last week on his way from Boston, where he 
had gone to decline in person the honor of the 
offered presidency of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, the alumni of the University of Califor- 
nia gave a banquet for him at the Hotel Lafayette. 
Other guests of the Alumni Club were Samuel E. 
Moffit of Collier's, Prof. Henderson of Adelphi Col- 
lege and Dr. George Shiels. A. W. Ransome, once 
the crack fullback of the University of California - 
varsity team, was toastmaster. 

In his talk to the alumni Dr. Wheeler explained 
that his principal business in the East was to assist 
in organizing a national alumni association. He 
felt, he said, that the university to gain first rank 
should be supported by its graduates in a systematic 
manner. He announced that arrangements for the 
organization were well under way and that a perma- 
nent secretary had been chosen. Inspeaking of his 
decision not to leave the Pacific coast, Dr. Wheeler 
declared that he felt it his duty to remain at the 
University of California and do his best to make it 
one of the great educational institutions of the 
country. It is a big field for any man, Dr. Wheeler 
said, and now that it has survived the earthquake 
and money is pouring in for its upbuilding he 
wanted "to stay by the job." 

* * * 

Knicker — Do you consider poker a game of 
chance? Booker — Purely. Sometimes my wife finds 
it out, and then again she doesn't. — Harper's Bazar. 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yourself. 




NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS 

The Finest Stock of Furniture in the West to Choose 

In the selection of our immense stock of furniture, carpets and draperies, 
we have endeavored to anticipate every demand for this locality. Only 
such lines as we know are the very best and most reliable were con- 
sidered, and we gladly guarantee every piece from our stock. The 



'Furniture do. 1 

640-646 SOUTH HILL ST. " 



HOT WEATHER COOKING 

Is unnecessary when you can purchase everything 
needed for a complete dinner at any one of our 
three stores. Note the city locations — you pass one 
of them every day. The choicest assortment of deli- 
catessen in the city. 

Lamb's Dept. Market Meek Baking Co. 

452 So. Broadway , 330 W. Third St. 

Venice Grocery Co. Venice 

Bode CEL Leidholdt 



Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



THE REMARKS OF MR. OTIS 

From the Riverside Press 

He is known to all the public, when some question they discuss, 

And the matter waxes hotter and the campaign vigorous ; 

When they plan momentous questions which they hope to carry 

through 
Without asking his assistance in a private interview, 
Then to show the party leaders that they've made an awful break, 
Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make. 

If he has some petty grievance or is holding back for spite, 
And refuses aid in quelling a disturbance or a fight, 
If the man who's up for office isn't listed with his friends, 
So that he can pull the puppet to accomplish selfish ends, 
We are very, very certain that the atmosphere will shake, — 
Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make. 

Doesn't make a bit of difference what the matter is about, 
If he cannot boss proceedings we are sure to hear him spout. 
Though the motive of the party may be honest and sincere, 
When the battle-cry is sounded in the foreground will appear 
This insinuating person, and to point out the mistake, 
Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make. 

Should the leaders of the movement take the opposition side, 
And by Harrison's advices and suggestions not abide, 
There's a roar of disapproval, and the candidate comes in 
For a scoring, a lampooning and a flaying to the skin. 
With a hatred that's vindictive ; with the venom of a snake, 
Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make. 

And the slaves within his castle who are toiling day by day, 
Should it happen they incur their monarch's anger in some way, 
Know, forsooth, their name is Dennis, when the ringing of a bell 
Summons them within the sanctum for a brief but dizzy spell. 
And the nature of the summons causes every heart to quake, — 
Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make. 



So it is and always has been. . He will ruin or he'll run, 

And his hammer's out and knocking just as it has always done. 

Every night before retiring to his downy feather bed ' 

He repeats this little couplet which is running through his head,- 

"Now I lay me down to slumber ; should I die before I wake, 

Mr. Harrison Gray Otis has a few remarks to make." 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



HISTORIC DEATH SENTENCES 

How Justice "Was Dispensed in Pioneer Territorial Courts 



In the early days of the American occupation of 
New Mexico Kirby Benedict, one of the most noted 
of the early frontier lawyers, served for eight years 
as chief justice of the territory. Judge Benedict's 
sentence of death upon Jose Maria Martin, who had 
been convicted of murder in Taos, then one of the 
most important points in the territory, has become 
historic. 

When the verdict of the jury was brought in 
Judge Benedict is reported to have addressed Mar- 
tin in the following language : 

"Jose Maria Martin, stand up. Jose Maria Martin, 
you have been indicted, tried and convicted by a 
jury of your countryment of the crime of murder, 
and the court is now about to pass upon you the 
dread sentence of the law. As a usual thing, Jose 
Maria Martin, it is a painful duty for a judge of the 
court of justice to pronounce upon a human being 
the sentence of death. There is something horrible 
about it, and the mind of the court usually revolts 
from the performance of such duty. Happily, how- 
ever, your case is relieved of all such unpleasant 
features and the court takes positive delight in sen- 
tencing you to death. 

"You are a young man, Jose Maria Martin, ap- 
parently of good physical constitution and robust 
health. Ordinarily you might have looked forward 
to many years of life, and the court has no doubt 
that you have, and have expected to die at a green 
old age; but you are about to be cut off in conse- 
quence of your own act. 

"Jose Maria Martin, it is now the spring time. In 
a little while the grass will be springing up green in 
these beautiful valleys, and on these broad mesas 
and mountain sides flowers will be blooming; birds 
will be singing their sweet carols and nature will be 
putting on her most gorgeous and her most attrac- 
tive robes, and life will be pleasant, and men will 
want to stay. But none of this for you, Jose Maria 
Martin. The flowers will not bloom for you, Jose 
Maria Martin; the birds will not carol for you, Jose 
Maria Martin. When these things come to gladden 
the senses of men you will be occupying a space 
about six by two beneath the sod, and the green 
grass and these beautiful flowers will be growing 
about your lowly head. 

"The sentence of the court is that you be taken 
from this place to the county jail; that you be there 
kept safely and securely confined in the custody of 
the sheriff until the day appointed for your execu- 
tion. — Be very careful, Mr. Sheriff, that he have no 
opportunity to escape, and that you have him at the 
appointed place at the appointed time. — That you 
be so kept, Jose Maria Martin, until — Mr. Clerk, on 
what day of the month does Friday, about two 
weeks from this time, come?" 

"On March 22, your honor." 

"Very well — until Friday, the twenty-second day 
of March, when you will be taken by the sheriff 
from your place of confinement to some safe and 
convenient spot within the county — that is in your 
discretion, Mr. Sheriff; you are confined to the 
limits of the county only — and that you there be 
hanged by the neck until you are dead; and, the 



court was about to add, Jose Maria Martin, 'may 
God have mercy on 5'our soul,' but the court will not 
assume the responsibility of asking an all-wise 
Providence to do that which a jury of your peers 
has refused to do. The Lord couldn't have mercy 
on your soul. However, if you affect any religious 
organization, it might be well for you to send for 
your priest or your minister and get from him — 
well, such consolation as you can get, but the court 
advises you to place no reliance upon anything, of 
that kind. Mr. Sheriff, remove the prisoner." 

Some published accounts state that Martin es- 
caped from his jailer in spite of the admonition of 
the court, and died several years later by falling 
from a wagon and breaking his neck. Old residents 
of Taos who were eye-witnesses state that the sen- 
tence of the court was executed. He was placed 
standing in a wagon, a rope was tied about his neck, 
the other end being attached to the limb of a tree 
above him, the team was started and his body fell, 
breaking his neck. 

Judge Benedict's term as 1 chief justice expired in 
1866 and Perry E. Brocchus was appointed to suc^ 
ceed him. Benedict resumed private practice, trav- 
eling all over the territory to attend sessions of the 
court. On one occasion, while Judge Brocchus was 
holding court in the town of Socorro, Benedict was 
presenting a motion to the court and during the 
argument spoke in a very loud voice and with vio- 
lence of gesture, knowing that Judge Brocchus was 
somewhat hard of hearing, though sensitive over 
the deficiency. After Benedict had got fairly started 
in his shouting, Judge Brocchus quietly stopped him 
with the admonition : 

"Judge Benedict, it is not necessary for you to 
speak so loudly. The court hears you without diffi- 
culty, and your loud tones and gesticulations are 
exceedingly unpleasant to the court." 

Benedict apologized, resumed his argument, and 
soon was as vehement and boisterous as ever. Once 
more Judge Brocchus leaned forward and said : 

"Judge Benedict, your tone of voice and your 
violence are offensive to the court, and you must be 
more moderate or suspend your remarks." 

Again Benedict apologized and remarked, in ex- 
tenuation of his conduct, that in the heat of argu- 
ment he had forgotten the court's instructions. 

"Very well, Judge Benedict," replied the court. 
"You may proceed, but hereafter do not be so for- 
getful of the court's wishes." 

Benedict again resumed, but presently was saw- 
ing the air with his hands and lifting his voice like 
the bull of Bashan. Judge Brocchus stood the very 
patent indignity for a few minutes, and then, rap- 
ping on the bench, said : 

"Mr. Sheriff, the court takes a recess for five 
minutes." He then climbed down from the bench, 
took the distinguished Benedict by the lapel of his 
coat and said : 

"You impudent old scoundrel, you howl at this 
court again and the court will thresh you all over 
the room." 

Benedict was profuse in his apologies and Judge 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Brocchus released him, resumed his seal and in- 
formed the culprit that he might proceed, which he 

did — but with groat moderation. 

Chief Justice Samuel B. Axtell, who occupied the 
Supreme Bench in New Mexico from 1882 to [885, 

had been governor of the territory. It i- rela 
that just before he went t" Springer, the county 
"t" Colfax county, to preside over the first term 
iurt there, he received a score or more of letters 
from cowboys and other desperate characters in- 
festing that neighborhood warning him that if he 
came he would never leave the county alive. Judge 
Axtell was known to be absolutely devoid of fear. 
and it had been given out that be would give short 
shrift to any malefactors brought before him if their 
guilt could be established. 

Undaunted by the threats conveyed to him, Judge 
Axtell was promptly on hand, unarmed, to open 
court. As he took bis seat he noticed that a large 
number of armed men were in the court room. • 

"Mr. Sheriff." said he as soon as he had comfort- 
ably settled himself upon the bench, "I notice that 
a large number of men in the room are bearing arms 
in defiance of the law. Can you tell me why?" 

"Why, sir," stammered the sheriff, looking about 
him in trepidation, "they are — some of them — are — 
are deputies, sir." 

"Deputies or no deputies," replied he, "see that 
they are disarmed instantly or I shall fine them each 
fifty dollars for contempt of court." 

It is hardly necessary to add that his order was 
obeyed, and within five minutes a stack of "six- 
shooters," every one of which was loaded, lay on 
the table. 

During the trial of "Dirty Dick" Rogers, a notor- 
ious desperado, and other men who had rendered 
human life cheap in that part of the Southwest for 
several years, Judge Axtell opened court promptly 
at the hour set, though he had received repeated 
warnings that to do so would mean certain death 
to him. On this occasion his first step was to cause 
all the court attendants and spectators to be 
searched before he allowed the case to be opened, 
with the result that no less than forty-two "guns," 
all loaded, as before, were piled on the table. Some 
of these had been taken from the attorneys in the 
case. Each man was heavily fined for bringing his 
weapon into the courtroom, and in spite of the 
threats which had been made, no show of resistance 
was made when the sheriff and his deputies set 
about the task of disarmament. 

In one case before Judge Axtell the defendant, a 
poor young fellow whose farm was in jeopardy, had 
no attorney. Seeing that the case was going against 
the man unless he could obtain legal counsel, the 
judge descended from the bench and began conduct- 
ing the cross examination, remarking: 

"It takes thirteen men to steal a poor boy's farm 
in New Mexico." 

Upon the conclusion of the submission of evi- 
dence he instructed the jury to find a verdict in be- 
half of the defendant. When the foreman announced 
a disagreement the judge discharged the jury, an- 
nounced a verdict in behalf of the defendant and 
told the sheriff never to allow any of the discharged 
jurymen to serve again in that county. 

It is related that during the term of William 
Breeden as attorney-general, when Judge Axteli had 




Sing Fat Co., 



Inc. 



Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-19 South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 1121 POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 




Los Angeles 

OstricH Farm 

Opposite 

EAST LAttE PARI1 

Most Beautiful Feather Display 
Ever Made in Los Ang'eles- 5c 
Car Fare on City or Pacific Elec- 
tric Cars. 

3 -A-cres of Gigantic 
=Birds — 



tfg&L 




An Exclusive Line of 

ART MATERIAL and RUSSIAN LACES 

Stamping a Specialty 

Needlework Emporium 



CORNER NINTH ST. 
and GRAND AVENUE 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



indulged in some rather caustic remarks to some of 
the attorneys who had been addressing him — a not 
' unusual thing for him to do — Breeden arose and, 
looking the judge squarely in the eye, remarked: 

"Don't be too hard on the lawyers, your honor; 
you might be a lawyer yourself some time, you 
know." 

New Mexico enjoys the distinction of being one 
of the very few states or territories in the United 
States in which a citizen was ever tried, convicted 
and hanged for the high crime of.treason. Follow- 
ing the uprising of 1847, commonly known as the 
Taos Revolution, several indictments for this of- 
fense were presented. The accused men were, for 
the most part, Mexican inhabitants of Taos county. 
Prior to the precipitation of the conflict at Taos a 
circular letter was sent out by Jesus Tafoya, 
countersigned by Antonio Maria Trujillo, "senior 
enspector," addressed to the various Mexican mili- 
tary commanders, urging them to rebel against the 
constituted American authority. "We have declared 
war against the Americans," declared this docu- 
ment, "and it is now time that we all take our arms 
in our hands in defense of our abandoned country." 

Trujillo was tried before Judge Joab Houghton 
and found guilty. The sentence imposed by the 
court is worthy of a place in history, being the only 
one of the kind passed in New Mexico, and probably 
the only one on record in the entire West. Accord- 
ing to the record of the district court, Judge Hough- 
ton addressed the convicted man in these words : 

"Antonio Maria Trujillo, a jury of twelve citizens, 
after a patient and careful investigation, pending 
which all the safeguards of the law, managed by 
able and indefatigable counsel, have been afforded 
you, have found you guilty of the high crime of 
treason. What have you to say why the sentence 
of death should not be pronounced against you? 

"Your age and gray hairs have excited the sym- 
pathy of both the court and the jury. Yet, while 
each and all were not only willing but anxious that 
you should have every advantage at your disposal 
that their highly responsible duty under the law to 
their country would permit, yet have you been found 
guilty of the crim'e alleged to your charge. It would 
appear that old age has not brought you wisdom nor 
purity nor honesty of heart. While holding out the 
hand of friendship to those whom circumstances 
have brought to rule over you, you have nourished 
bitterness and hatred in your heart. You have been 
found seconding the acts of a band of the most 
traitorous murderers that ever blackened with the 
recitals of their deeds the annals of history. 

"Not content with the peace and security in which 
you have lived under the present government, se- 
cure in all your personal rights as a citizen, in prop- 
erty, in person, and in your religion, you gave your 
name and influence to measures intended to effect 
universal murder and pillage, the overthrow of the 
government and one widespread scene of bloodshed 
in the land. For such foul crimes an enlightened 
and liberal jury have been compelled, from the evi- 
dence brought before them, and by a sense of their 
stern but unmistakable duty, to find you guilty of 
treason against the government under which you 
are a citizen. And there only now remains to the 
court the painful duty of passing upon you the sen- 
tence of the law, which is that you be taken from 



"&/>e Brass Bowl" 

By Louis Joseph Vance. Pictures by Orson Lowell. 
Price $1.35. 

"Among the fiction books for the coming sum- 
mer's reading 'The Brass Bowl' by Louis Joseph 
Vance should hold a high place. 

"It is one of the best pieces of rattling romance 
that has been put out in many a day." 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 
The Big Book Store 252 S. Spring St,. 

"The Store With the Money Back Policy." 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
-S^INGS^BANK 




Money is the marvelous in- 
strument to which we are 
indebted for our wealth and 
civilization. 

Ready money drives thle 
wedge into success. 
A savings account is the safest 
way to accumulate "ready 
money." 

Join the 20,000 depositors 
who are building wealth with 
our assistance. 

Four per cent paid on De- 
posits. 
GERMAN AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK 
223 SOUTH SPRING STREET 

BRANCH: MAIN AND FIRST STS 




MCDONALD'S HAMMING COLLEGE 




SVITE 3&ANTJ 40 r J> * LOS ANGELES 
MERCANTILE PUCE If CALIFORNIA 

NEAR SPRING ST. " HOME FH0ME F 8327 

The College is equipped with all the modern facilities known 
to the profession — every device that will aid the student in 
mastering the work in a professional manner. I]] Patrons 
received at reduced prices— treated by senior students un- 
der the personal supervision of experienced attendants. 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



hence to prison, there t" remain until Friday, the 
sixteenth day ol April next, and that al two o 
in the afternoon of that day you be taken thence to 
the place of execution, and there be hanged by the 
neck until you are dead, dead, dead. And may the 
Almighty have mercy on your soul!" 

* * * 
UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 

A Great Artist 

Granville Redmond's exhibition, which opened 
last Monday at No. 336^2 South Broadway, empha- 
sizes the fact that the painter is really a big man. 
The sixteen canvases that he exposes are not seen to 
the best advantage, however, inasmuch as the gal- 
lery is too small. .Many of the pictures are large. 
and it is almost impossible to obtain enough distance 
to see them satisfactorily. 

This midsummer exhibition represents Mr. Red- 
mond in many phases of artistic interpretation. One 
cannot study the pictures without feeling the 
painter's compelling power. Upon most of the 
canvases are to be found interpretations of Nature 
in her superb moods — moods that say to man that 
he is a weakling who can but grope toward the 
sublime. Mr. Redmond has vigor, strength, tremen- 
dous forcefulness, yet in no picture of this collec- 
tion has he reached his highest standard. This does 
not mean ' that he has fallen away from his best 
ideals, for counting the sixteen pictures the critic 
must acknowledge that they comprise a remarkable 
message from a man who has genius. Mr. Redmond 
has not done his mightiest work on any one canvas, 
but all the canvases are extraordinary. 

The "Cloudy Day at Monterey," which has the 
distinction of being marked No. I, is simple in com- 
position, harmonious in coloring, magnificent in 
treatment. The handling of the light, the cloud 
effects and the big trees announce one who will be a 
master if he is true to the best in him. Here are 
magnificent distances in which the space gives the 
spectator a distinct uplift. It is as if the hiding of 
the sky toward which the wind-swayed trees" lift 
their tops were for the purpose of suggesting the 
cryptic quality of Nature. 

"The Mowers" is the second of the large pictures. 
It is one of the canvases that will arrest most atten- 
tion, for it has the distinction of being quite a de- 
parture from the subjects usually chosen by the 
artist. Here figures are introduced most effectively, 
but it is the harvest field that brings out the recogni- 
tion of uncommon talent. Field and sky are admira- 
bly painted so that one who stands" before the 
picture feels himself drawn into it. "Passing 
Shadows," the third of the pictures, is a pastoral in 
which the cloud shadows are employed in splendid 
contrast with the stretch of sunlit pasture land upon 
which a flock of sheep grazes. The value of this 
picture, as well as "The Monarchs" which occupies 
the opposite end of the gallery, is lost because the 
visitor cannot stand far enough away. "The Mon- 
archs" is a study of trees in which the composition 
is remarkably strong. Here Mr. Redmond has used 
trees with branches that intertwine so thai the won- 
derful curved lines create a beautiful effect. Age. 
mystery, the subtle witchery of the forest are caught 
in this picture. 

"The r.attle of the Giants" is a marine 111 which 



the n;m~ are beating against greal brown rocks. 

I Kcrhead is a leaden sky. There is tremendous 
motion in the water, which rises in froth tipped 
waves, but. somehow', the rocks are not convincing 

and the contrast between the brilliant color of the 



REMOVAL NOTICE 




Mrs. H. Sullivan 



Announces t<> her many friends and former clients 
that she may be fruind in her new quarters at 



6 37 S. Broad 



way 



A complete assortment of Children's, In- 
fants' and Ladies' Wear — the product of 
my own factory. 

...Phone Main 3999 




Summer Prices 



IN 



Table 
Silverware 



We need the room for our fall stock and offer both 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 



"We are Practical Watchmahers - 




You See Us 



BRIGDEN ^ PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 

5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER... 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



sea and the dull tones of the sky fails to please. Yet 
in many respects this is a really great picture. In 
this sky as in several of the other skies there is a 
tendency toward opaqueness of color that does not 
belong to the work of a man who paints with the 
splendid technique that distinguishes Mr. Red- 
mond's work. 

"The Restful Song of the Deep" is an exquisite 
harmony that will make an appeal to every one who 
appreciates the poetic in art: "In the Hushed Si- 
lence" and "Land o' Dreams" are two of the 
dreamy, low-keyed pictures done in the style that 
has made the artist's growing fame. The study of 
"Spring Showers" is another beautiful picture, 
which should not wait long for a purchaser. 

It is not fair to attempt a description of these 
really noteworthy pictures in the space of an ordi- 
nary article. Each will repay study, for here in Los 
Angeles has developed an artist to whom the most 
extraordinary achievements are possible. In this 
collection Mr. Redmond gives assurance that he 
has marvelous versatility and that in landscapes and 
marines he has not yet shown half his possibilities. 
Instead of proving that he has limitations, he has 
announced that he is developing along many lines. 
Evidently he has reached a most critical period in 
his career — a period in which he has passed to the 
place where he depends less and less upon the mere 
delight of color harmonies and more and more upon 
the power to produce unusual compositions in which 
■he can combine the poetic and interpretative 
qualities. 



Art Notes 

Mrs. Elizabeth Borglum will give her last "at 
home" Sunday at her picturesque place in Sierra 
Madre. She will pass the summer sketching at one 
of the beach resorts. 

C. P. Neilson has gone to San Diego for the sum- 
mer. He will conduct a sketching class. His ex- 
hibition in San Diego proved to be a great success. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Swift Daniell are in Long 
Beach, where they will remain for a month. Mr. 
Daniell has made a number of marine sketches, 
which are interesting as they prove how much this 
well-known painter in water colors can do with the 
medium of oils. 

* * * 

Worh. for Redlands 

Redlands is now interested in the work of pro- 
curing the $100,000 bonus which is a condition upon 
which the location of the Baptist college depends. 
A large part of the money has been subscribed and 
the choice of location is likely to be the forty-acre 
tract in the northwestern part of the 'city. It is 
hoped that the buildings may be begun a year from 
this summer. 

* ¥ ¥ 

Where Autos Are Barred 

Owners of touring cars will be disappointed if 
they have planned motor trips through the Yosem- 
ite. By a recent ruling of the secretary of the in- 
terior automobiles are prohibited from entering 
the National Park or the Mariposa grove. This 
order is due to the danger of stage coach accidents, 
as horses frequently have been frightened by the 
f ouring cars. 



So. Broad wav "V^'^' ■:' So. Hill Sthekt 



A. Fl'SB.VOT CO. 



'THe Store Beautiful" 

Our Great 



Genuine Reductions have been made in all depar.t- 
ments. All odds and ends and broken assortments, 
the natural result of a large business like ours, will 
be cleaned out quickly 

Regardless off Wo^w&.@v Prices 

We especially emphasize the Remarkable Reductions on 

Suits, Coats, Dress Goods, Millinery, 
Silks and Wash Goods 

Specials ff©s° jMaly ®tfia 

EXTRAORDINARY SALE OF 
SEMI-MADE ROBES 

Note the wonderful savings 

$15 to $20 Robes at $ 9.50 

$24 to $30 Robes at $14.50 

$30 to $70 Robes at $19.50 

These magnificent robes are in Hand Embroidered 
Linen, or MULL and BATISTE EMBROIDERY. 
White and colors, some lace trimmed. 

Every one worthy of an early selection. Be prompt. 



PARLOR MILLINERY. 



eJJlls 



Miss Lillie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F 317S 



An Evening With 
Browning 


An 


i ■ ■■».' i 


Character 


Afternoon 


Hr^H 


Sketches 




™ 


in 


of 


■ 

W Pi' ■ 


Costume 


Fairy 


[J 1 


** 


Tales 


wJ 


Readings 
from 


for 




Popular 


Children 


II 


Books 


MISS GILBERT 

select gathenr 


will furnish evening e 
gs during July and Augu 


ntertainments for 
st. Address 


42 1 W. Adams St,. Phone B 3 1 26 



Pacific Outlook 



25 




SOCIETY 




Too Hot for Entertainments 
Fourth of July week is always dull in a social 
way and the heat of this year prevented many enter- 
tainments planned in the days when the sun was 

curtained by the ocean fog. ( hit of town trips were 
in favor. There were numerous house parties at 
beach cottages and country places. The long- 
awaited opportunity to wear thin gowns and outing 
costumes was appreciated. The summer girl was 
never more fluffy: the summer man was never more 
striking. The lingerie hat, the white canvas shoe 
and the gay parasol had their innings. 



Country Club's Good Fortune 
Members of the Country Club are rejoicing over 
the outlook for the future. A recently issued state- 
ment of the directors announces that the land, 
bought after a postal vote of the members, has in- 
creased greatly in value. The one hundred and 
forty acres lie west of Morrocco Junction and adjoin 
Beverly Hills. The grounds* to be used for golf 
links are most picturesque. It is the plan to expend 
$75,000 for an ideal club house and for other im- 
provements. Apartments will be provided for the 
occupation of members who desire to pass several 
days or an entire vacation at the club house. The. 
lease on the present site will expire in October, 1909, 
and by that time it is expected that the new build- 
ing will be completed and the golf course in first 
rate condition. 



Paul de Longpre is passing the warm weather in 
exhausting efforts to add , another composition or 
two to the list that now affords him so much pride. 
Mr. de Longpre is not a trained musician, but like 
many persons of talent, he longs to do the thing 
that is far removed from his life work. The results 
of his desire to express himself in melody are neces- 
sarily trivial, but they have the quality of popular- 
ity. One day last week when Mrs. Harmon D. 
Ryus visited the artist-composer's studio she was 
asked to play the latest work — opus 12 — and the 
celebrated pianist interpreted the "piece" in a wav 
that delighted Mr. De Longpre, who beat time to 
the music. 

Miss Marguerite Arnold of South Flower street 
will give a luncheon next Wednesday in honor of 
Miss Clementine Griffin and Miss Ruth Radford. 
Miss Griffin is at home after a busy year at Vassal". 
The guests will be members of the sorority to which 
Miss Griffin and Miss Bradford belong. Covers 
will be laid for Miss Radford, Miss Griffin, Miss 
Grace Stoermer, Miss Bonita Bowen. Miss Mildred 
Miller. Miss Adah Heney. Miss Nano Whittlesey 
and Miss Edith Buchanan. 

There was a hegira for Europe this week. Mi- 
ami Mrs. Edwin S. Row ley and Miss Grace Rowley. 
No. 2631 Menlo avenue, started East Tuesday. 
They will sail July 12 from Quebec. Mrs. Louise C. 
Carr and Miss Katheriiie C. Carr left Los Angeles 
Tuesday. for a six months' trip. Miss Jennie Wal- 



rath. No. (172 Burlington avenue, is on her way to 

England where she will visit relatives. Mrs. Edith 
Lowe, Miss Flora Shclton, .Miss Ruth B. Copp and 
Mrs. Lulu Mayne-Windsor will sail July 18. After 
two months' travel they will go to Milan where 
Mrs. Mayne-AYindsor's pupils, Mrs. Lowe and Miss 
Shelton, will study vocal music. 

Eric L. Barr, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Barr of 
Los Angeles, has passed his examinations for the 
United States Naval Academy with high honors. 
Young Barr was in the senior class of the high 
school when he received his appointment and has 
been studying recently at an Annapolis preparatory 
school. 

J. W. Wright and Miss Green were married a 
fortnight ago in Colorado Springs, wdtere Mr. 




I! 



istae. 



§ 



Toilet 
Parlors 



The most sanitary and the most up-to-date hair 
dressing- parlors — with the largest and most complete 
stock of hair goods in the city. 

All her preparations are guaranteed under the pure food and drug laws. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Manicuring 
HEADQUARTERS 

Central Department Store 

609-619 South Broadway 

On Balcony Adjoining Ladies' Rest Room 



ARTS AND 

MRS. 

Hand Painted China 

Hammered Metals 

Burnt and Modeled Leather 


CRAFTS SHOP 

C. D. WESTON 

Home Phone E 3345 

3^7 S- Broad-way 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



Wright has been engaged in business since he left 
the editorial staff of the Times two years ago. Mr. 
Wright's bride was his business partner in a pros- 
perous brokerage business. She is young, pretty 
and clever. Mr. Wright has made more than an 
ordinary reputation as a writer. He is the son of 
Mrs. Mary Bartow of Los Angeles, from whom 
he inherits unusual talents. 

Announcement that Mrs. Catherine Collette and 
Edmond S. Shank were to be married in Santa Bar- 
bara brought out many expressions of good will 
from the musicians of Los Angeles, among whom 
the bride has been a conspicuous figure. Endowed 
with a voice of much beauty Mrs. Collette made 
much of her great gift. She has a personality of 
great charm. The news that she will not leave Los 
Angeles causes pleasure, and "Suhnyacre," her 
home in Glendale, doubtless will be a new center of 
musical interest. 

The fourteenth birthday anniversary of Miss 
Leonora Cozanoy Castro, eldest daughter of the 
Mexican consul, was celebrated Monday evening by 
a dinner given at the Castro home, No. 1515 West 
Seventh street. Friends of Miss Castro served a 
Spanish dinner at which thirty-rive guests were 
present. After dinner Mrs. Marie D.' Owens and 
Andrew Munoz of the City of Mexico sang Spanish 
songs. 

Mrs. Florence E. Bates of Kansas City is one of 
the summer visitors in Los Angeles. On her way 
home from a long trip through the Orient, Mrs. 
Bates stopped to renew her friendship with a num- 
ber of well-known residents of Southern California. 
She was entertained by Mrs. W. I. Hollingsworth 
and Mrs. Erasmus Wilson. 

Mr. and Mrs. John R. Posey returned from their 
motor trip to the Yosemite— automobiles are barred 
out so that it is impossible to go through the great 
natural wonder park— in time to enjoy the festivities 
of the Fourth. Miss Brownie Coulter and Miss 
Irene Kelly made the trip with them. 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter Jarvis Barlow, who returned 
last week from a three months' visit in the East 
entertained a house party over the Fourth at their 
country home in Sierra Madre. 

Mrs. J. Frank Hittell, niece of the late President 
Garfield, is visiting at the home of her aunt Mrs 
Lucretia R. Garfield, in South Pasadena. 

Miss Virginia Johnson, No. 345 Westlake avenue, 
is being much entertained since her return from 
school in Washington, D. C. 

Miss Rejoyce Collins and Miss Constance Collins 
will pass the summer in the East. They are now 
visiting in San Francisco. 

Mrs. John A. Hunter and daughters, Miss Sue 
Hunter and Miss Mildred Hunter, have gone to 
Catalina for the summer. 

Mrs. H. Page Warden of Pasadena will start for 
Europe next week for a trip of several months' 
duration. 

Henry Edmond Earl, the Pasadena composer and 
pianist, went East this week for a long vacation. 

Senator Flint and family will pass the summer 
at Balboa Beach, where they have a cottage. 

Former residents of Boston will enjoy" an "Old 
Ffome" week from July 28 to August 3. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin T. Earl have gone to Lake 
Tahoc for the summer. 



Same Old Excuse 

Employer — This makes the fourth grandmother 
of yours that has died this spring. Office Boy — I 
know it; ain't these family troubles fierce? — Cor- 
nell Widow. 

* * * 

Land of the Strap-hangers 
Church — I see that Argentine has a 54-mile horse 
railway. It is the longest in the world. Gotham — 
Gee ! Thinking of holding on to a strap for 54 
miles ! — Yonkers Statesman. 

* * * 

"May I call you Mabel?" he askd at their second 
meeting, pretending- to be badly smitten. "If you 
wish to; but my name is Gertrude." — Chicago 
Record-Herald. 



Facing 

the 

Park 

and 
Close 

to 
Ocean 



Hotel Savoy 

___ _ 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Everything New 

No. 142-1421 Pacific Avenue 
Long Beach, Cal. 



Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 

Home 
Phone 
1743 



Phone Home 441 




(Sfo jRttrigra 



The Largest and Leading 

Hotel in Long 

Beach 



Modern in all its 
Appointments .. 

- Sm. a. schutz, m. d. 

Proprietor 

Massage and Turkish Baths in Connection 

Rooms $3.00 per Week and Up 

Corner Second and Chestnut Sts. Long Beach, Cal. 



E WESTPHj 

M. J. BLAISDELL, Proprietor 



1 30 West, Third Street. 

ROOMS — Prices from 75 cents per day and up 



Home Phone 1 183 Sunset 3443 

Ho&el Yale (European) 

Corner First and Pacific Ave. 

and "SURF VIEW" on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M. WORMLEY, Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies, Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread. "Like mother used to make" 

Home Phone r07S 

114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



Pacific Outlook 



27 




Notes on Amusements 

"The Lily and the Prince" at the Burbank this 
week is well played and well staged. Miss Hall does 
a pretty piece of work and rises to the demands of 
the intense dramatic situations. Harry Mestayer as 
Cardinal Capua wins well-merited applause. Miss 
Maude Gilbert as Lucrezia Borgia hides her charm- 
ing personality successfully. 

Announcement that John H. Blackwood, who has 
obtained "Little Dorrit" for production at the 
Belasco Theater, has the temerity to imagine Nat 
'win will take a week out of his vacation time 
t'> play in it arouses interest and it also causes ad- 
miration for Mr. Blackwood's talents as a press 
agent. 

With the Saturday evening performance of "The 
Serenade'' the Californians will end their engage- 
ment at the Auditorium. This opera so delightfully 
sung and so beautifully staged is a worthy farewell 
offering- from Tom Karl and Dillon Dewey, under 
whose management the short season has been a 
success. It is possible that the Californians may 
make a tour through Southern California. Many 
good offers have been made, but Mr. Karl and Mr. 
Dewey have earned their long-planned trip East and 
they may not be persuaded to continue the cares of 
an opera company. 

"A Fair Exchange" at the Belasco this week is a 
happy choice for warm weather. A pretty, frothy 
love story is cleverly worked out and Lewis Stone 
in yachting costume does an entertaining bit of 
acting. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Stone will start next week 
for a long vacation in the Yosemite. While Mr. 
Stone is away Mr. Bosworth will play leading parts. 
His first appearance will be next Monday evening 
in Stanislaus Stange's "Friend Fritz." 

Maud Adams will appear in Peter Pan at the 
Mason Opera house next Monday evening. 

Garnet Holme, who is now dramatic director at 
the University of California, has come South to pass 
his vacation. Mr. Holme has had a most successful 
season as actor and as manaeer of the student actors 
of Berkeley. After a tour with a company that put 
(in Shakespearean plays he was persauded to return 
to Berkeley, where his appearance in the role of Bot- 
tom in Miss Constance Crawley's production of "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream'" a year ago made a hit. 
He is now well established at the university* and the 
plays put on lor the 07 commencement season are 
saiil to he the most noteworthv of any in which the 
student organizations have appeared. 

Announcement that Mr. and Mrs. Mace Green- 
leaf will appear in vaudeville next season in a play- 
let written by themselves cause.-, more than ordinary 
interest. Since the marriage a \ ear ago of Mis- 
Lucy Banning, the daughter of Mrs. Mary Banning, 



to tiie leading man at the Burbank, little has been 
heard of Mr. and Mrs. Greenleaf, wdio have been 
living quietly in Los Angeles when they were not 
traveling. Mrs. Greenleaf possesses such extraor- 
dinary beauty that she has a fair chance to become 
one of the stage beauties. Inasmuch as she has 
been able to write her own part it ought to be the 
right medium through which to bid for public favor. 

* * * 

Shovild be "Doctor of Humor" 

\\ hen Mark Twain received the degree of Doctor 
of Letters, honoris causa, at Oixford, June 26, Lord 
Curzon presided over the convocation in the Shel- 
donian Theater. The list of twenty-five distin- 
guished personages upon whom the honor was to be 
conferred was read with Whitelaw Reid's name sec- 
ond on the roll. .Addressing Mark Twain in Latin . 
Lord Curzon conferred the degree. His speech 
translated was : 

"Most jocund, pleasant and. humorous man who 
shake the sides of all the circuit of the earth with 
your native joyousness, I, by my authority and that 




A PROPOSITION 



SUu-I 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 




D. H. BALDWIN <©, CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St,. 




Office Phone: Ji rost 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

555 South Hill Street 

Residence Phone: E 2727 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



of the entire university, admit you to the honorary 
degree of Doctor in Letters." 

Wearing the scarlet gown with gray • hood, the 
American humorist advanced to receive the degree. 
He was cheered again and again. After the cere- 
monies the undergraduates besought him for his 
autograph and he wrote his name until his fountain 
pen was dry. Now the question is whether Samuel 
Langhorne Clemens or Mark Twain shall wear the 
title "Dr." Although the degree was conferred upon 
Mr. Clemens, it was Mark Twain who won it, there- 
fore the Pacific Outlook congratulates Dr. Twain. 
* * * 

"Why Los Angeles Prospers 

"This 'garden spot' of the American continent," 
says the New York Financier in referring to Los 
Angeles and our banking institutions, "the center 
of the most prolific field for the cultivation of citrus 
fruits, which find their way to all of our Eastern 
cities ; this mecca of domestic tourists is likewise 
the center of the more important of the financial 
concerns of the Golden State. Though Los Angeles 
is a comparatively young city, as is shown by the 
fact that the first bank was organized forty years 
ago — when the transcontinental railroad had weld- 
ed together the East and the West, and had con- 
verted the original gold mining camp into that most 
prosperous city, San Francisco, then the terminus 
of the road and the output and entrepot for the 
distribution of Pacific commerce — its ideal climate 
and the agricultural and pomological possibilities 
of Los Angeles's surroundings attracted such atten- 
tion as to invite its settlement by a most industaous 
and enterprising population, whose energies con- 
tributed to the rapid development of the city and 
stimulated the creation of business, inter-commer- 
cial and financial facilities, the results of which are 
shown in the most marvelous progress in banking 
of almost any city of corresponding origin in the 
United States. 

"Los Angeles has prospered largely because ot 
the advantages it possessed, as above stated, of 
climate and most unequalled facilities for develop- 
ment. Had it not been, however, for the energetic 
efforts of its people it might have grown less rapid- 
ly and not attained the prominence it now enjoys 
as the leading city of Southern California. It not 
only presents a scene of business acitivity but, as 
the result of such energy, it has a greater number 
of banks in proportion to its area than any other 
municipality of its population in the country. The 
banking business, however, has flourished, instead 
of suffering through the competition of these 
numerous financial institutions; this is shown bv 
the fact that the deposits of the three leading Los 
Angeles banks are in excess of those of the institu- 
tions in Minneapolis, Minn. ; Jersey City, N. J. ; In- 
dianapolis, Ind., and Louisville, Ky., having a popu- 
lation of 250,000, or equal to that of Los Angeles. 
The forty or more banks of this progressive city of 
Los Angeles, having an aggregate capital and sur- 
plus of eighteen millions, have a grand total -of up- 
wards of one hundred millions of deposits, and by 
reference to the list, in the above mentioned com- 
munication, it will be seen that all are of a most 
substantial character. Some of the business of 
these institutions is derived from tourists who bring- 
to the city very considerable sums of money for 



expenditure and for temporary investment. Realiz- 
ing the importance of this class of patronage the 
larger banks extend facilities for the accommoda- 
tion of such patrons by exchanging their drafts for 
cash, taking necessary, though not restrictive pre- 
cautions, to guard against loss. 

"Forty years ago, as above noted, the first bank in 
Los Angeles was organized. In the first three de- 
cades the banking growth of the city was compara- 
tively slow ; the surrounding country lacked the 
stimulus of direct railroad communication which it 
now enjoys and that was not fully provided until 
the Southern Pacific was organized in 1885. There- 
after the extensions of this road and of the Atchi- 
son brought Los Angeles into communication with 
the rapidly developing territory of Southern Cali- 
fornia, the Pacific Coast cities and the Eastern 
trunk line systems, and growth of Los Angeles was 
promoted and the then most important agricultural 
and pomological industries were encouraged. Bank- 
ing progress was stimulated and in the decade fol- 
lowing 1896 such progress was most surprising. In 
that year there were not more than one quarter the 
number of banks that are now in operation, and 
their combined deposits did not exceed ten mil- 
lions. Individual instances of remarkable progress 
are shown by three of the largest banks — one or- 
ganized in 1871, another in 1880 and a third in 1884. 
The present standing of these institutions is indi- 
cated by an aggregate of forty-four millions of de- 
posits, against fifty-five and four-fifths millions held 
by all of the remaining banks. It is noteworthy that 
in the last ten years only two Los Angeles institu- 
tions have failed, one in 1893 and another in 1895. 

"With this record of successful progress in the 
last decade the immediate future seems brilliant. 
The field of banking enterprise is expanding ; the 
population of the city is increasing;' its industries 
and those of the surrounding country are develop- 
ing to a marvelous degree and apparently in a very 
short time the salubrity of climate will attract a 
vastly greater population and the accessibility of 
the city to tourists, through railroad extensions, will 
be enormously increased. The fruit crops of South- 
ern California are phenomenally abundant ; the de- 
mand for them is great from every section of the 
country and from Europe, and the generally profit- 
able character of this industry will doubtless contri- 
bute to the enlargement of the field for cultivation 
in every locality where favorable conditions prevail. 
This industry will vastly increase the material 
wealth of the community and contribute to the 
augmentation of the banking business of this pro- 
gressive city." 

* * * 

Average Size 

Hicks — I dropped around to see the Fitz Kloses 
in their flat last night, but I couldn't get in. Wicks — ■ 
Not at home, eh?. Hicks — Yes, they were all at 
home ; that was the trouble. — Catholic Standard and 
Times. 

* * * 

A^itH a Local Application 

"We made a big hit in Salt Lake." "How was 
that?" "Our press agent got out some extra print- 
ing and billed us as singing 'The Chimes of Mor- 
mondy.' " — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



How Nosmo Got His Name 
He stepped up to the hotel desk and inscribed his 

name in full round characters: "Nosmo King Mc- 
Henry. Hackensack, N. J." 

"That's a rather odd name. Mr. McHenry," sug- 
ed the clerk. "Nosmo — Nosmo I That's surely 
new to T.os Ang< 

"Yes," replied the tired traveler. "It's new 
mgh. I guess that Los Angeles is not the only 
n where it's unknown." 

"Family name?" continued the clerk as he wrote 
"23" after the signature. 

"' >h. no; just a pick-up: but it's my own name, 
all right." 

"< >dd," persisted the clerk. 

"You seem to want to know all about it. so I 
might as well relieve your mind," said Mr. Mc- 
Henry. as he drew a birdseye match across the 
highly polished surface of the counter. "When I 
struck earth I was the tenth in order of succession 
in our family, and my mother was stuck for a name. 
In our family we had a Patrick, a Michael, a Den- 
nis, a Peleg, a Clarence, a Jerry and a few other 
more or less commonplace names, and when I ar- 
rived my mother's mind was ripe for something 
more romantic. She looked through novel after 
novel, attended play after play, asked friend after 
friend for a suggestion, and in the meantime I went 
unchristened. They called me "Baby" and "Tootsy- 
wootsy" and unthinkable things like that until I 
got to be four or five months old. 

"One day my mother was trundling me down the 
street in Hackensack when her attention was held 
by what she says was the most artistic entrance to 
a business building she had ever seen. There were 
double doors partially covered with green baize, 
containing mirrors surmounted by a painting and 
several gimcracks of some sort. On the door which 
had been swung to she saw the name 'Nosmo.' The 
fact that she once had thought of naming me Cosmo 
doubtless prompted her to accept the name of 
Nosmo as a sort of heaven-sent gift, for she then 
and there determined to have me christened by that 
name. Soon afterward she was on her way back. 
As she passed the place which has attracted her, 
she found the open door had been closed and vice 
versa. On the second door she saw the name 'King.' 
So the proprietor of the place was Mr. Nosmo 
King? 'Nosmo King McHenry,' she kept saying- 
over to herself. 'That's it ; that's it.' And that was 
'it.' as you have seen. 

"A week later she took me over to the church 
and the name was duly fastened upon me for life. 
With feelings of gratitude, I presume, she thought 
it would be a nice thing to call upon Mr. King and 
present me as his namesake. But — heavens, what 
a shock ! As she pulled up in front of the place 
both the doors had swung together and there she 
read it. I can almost recall how my baby carriage 
rolled off the sidewalk into the street and I was 
pitched head first to the pavement as my poor 
mother lei go of the handles in order that she might 
faint in the approved way. And do you wonder 
why she fainted? Just look at that name more 
closely. Write it down in one word, leaving out 
the second capital. No — run the words together. 
There, you have what my mother saw on those 
beautiful green baize doors — 'No smoking.' " 

Mr. McHenry turned sadly from the desk, puffing 



at his black cigar. As he strolled into the ladies' 
iption room with a vacant, faraway expression 
in his Ant touched his arm and he 

turned tO see u hat was wanted. 

"Beg yer pardon, sir. No smoking.' He gave an 
interrogative twist to the last two words. 

"Yes — yes — sure — all right." he said as he hesi- 
tated on liis way. "They're all onto me, it seems," 
he added to himself. 

» * * 
Automobile Wisdom 

One of the most ancient wheezes of automobil- 
ing has to do with the case of a woman owner 
who asked her river why the car would not run 
faster and upon being told that one of the cylinders 
was missing made indignant inquiry as to how he 
could have been so careless as to lose it. One of 
the latest bits of mechanical wisdom circulated for 
the benefit of troubled men who drive their own 
cars reads as follows : "Automobile owners have 
noticed at times when they are out on the road 
that the engine will occasionally miss fire on one 
cylinder. The trouble can at times be traced to a 
defective coil or, more strictly speaking, to a de- 
fective unit of a coil. The trouble can be located 
usually by changing the units around. If the unit 
is then at fault, the miss will manifest itself in an- 
other cylinder." 

* * * 
The Negro Tennyson 

Fired by his enthusiasm over the work of the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission, Daniel W. Moore, 
a negro, better known as Tennyson, Jr., chief of 
the commission's messenger force, has composed an 
ode, says a Washington dipatch to the New York 
Sun. It tells in stirring words of the great work 
that has been accomplished by the commission in 
enforcing the railroad rate act. Here is the first 
stanza : 

In one of the country's noble cities 
Stands a building of great repute, 

And within, there are many hearings 
Of large and small railroad suits. 

Tennyson, Jr., -introduces the personnel of the 
commission in the following words : 

The commissioners of this great project 
Are men of experience and influence besides 

With a Secretary who never falters 

In expounding questions great and wide. 

Then the ode proceeds to tell of the laws under 
which the commission works as follows : 

The country are surveyed with justice. 

By their wise and dauntless skill. 
By Congress they are empowered and protected 

Through the Elkins and Hepburn bills. 

The ode concludes with the following passionate 
eulogium : 

They have ventured out on the waters 
With dauntless courage, as on land, 

And unreasonable rates they have captured, 
On women, children and passenger men. 

But men are seldom more honorable found 
Who does business in anv big citv or town 
And are credited with any more ambition, 
Than those employed at the Interstate Commission. 

Mr. Moore savs that several magazines have been 
trying to get his poem, but he prefers to have it ap- 
pear in the columns of the daily press. 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



THE BUSTED BOOM 



Tragedy of the Signboards 

A stranger; 1, in Hoosierdom. I'd tramped the livelong- 
day 

And now, the shades of night were on — I knew not where 
to stay. 

No town in sight — no handy barn — naught but a sign- 
board white, 

Its ghost-like hands all pointing to the corners' of the 
night: 



im~ to 



FAIRBANKS 



"How's this?" thought I. "Is there no place save Fair- 
banks near this lane? 

Or can it be that all the towns have Fairbanks on the 
brain?" 

In weariness I trudged along — so tired, my feet so sore, 

Until there loomed upon my gaze a sign on a barn door: 



IW-To 



FAIRBANKS 



The letters were a good yard long, were thin and long and 

spare, 
Just like the form that once I saw, so lank, yet debonair — 
The figure of a statesman whose every move was made 
To keep the name of Fairbanks from sliding in the shade. 

■Twas FAIRBANKS 

That night I slept, then wandered on, my mind disturbed 

by thought 
Of him who once affirmed that two and two make. four. I 

sought 
A field afar from Fairbanks towns, where old Ben 

Adhem's fame 
Might offer the suggestion of another statesman's name 

Save Fairbanks. 

I tramped through many other states; few signboards did 

I see 
~*h~t bore the magic name the Hoosiers tacked to every 

tree. 
Once in a while the word bobbed up, in letters short and 

narrow, 
Enough to give the Fairbanks boom a chill, a frozen 

marrow- 
Like "Fairbanks" 

T '. bet just hall a dollar that the Fairbanks boom's gone 

broke; 
That Charley's aspirations have gone up in thinnest smoke. 
For though his daily papers employ the barn door stripe, 
Go where I may, the past month's shown me nothing but 

this type: 

Just "fiilrbanks'' 
* * * 

Fidus Achates 

I met him on the cars 

Where resignedly he sat, 
His hair was full of dust, 

And so was his cravat. 
He was furthermore embellished 

By a free pass in his hat. 

He was on his homeward way 
From the town where P. Calhoun 

Had fixed up a job with him 
To the fascinating tune 

Of five figures in cold cash 
And the motto: "Rool or room" 

Though he knew the time would come 
When he'd hear resounding "hollers" 

From the throats of decent men 
Unadorned by bosses' collars, 

What cared he? For he had cinched 
That $15,000. 



Simply Infolonel 

By a Private 

The captain remarked to his colonel: 
"I see by the last Army Jolonel 

That the army canteen 

May become a 'has been;' 
Now, isn't that simply infolonel?" 

Said the colonel: "The esprit de corps 
Is bound to induce a big rorps, 

And it's safe to assume 

Such an order will doom 
The whole army to thoughts of red gorps." 

* * * 

Lament of Sambo tKe Widower 



By. Anna Gist Rogers 
Oh! Be she went, and am she gone? 

And leaves she here I all alone? 
O, cruel Fate! Thou beest unkind 

To take she 'fore and leave me 'hind. 

* * * 

Man and Superman 

OIJD 'SAW 

As a rule, man's a fool. 

When it's hot, he wants it cool; 
When it's cool, he wants it hot — 
Always wanting what is not, 
Never wanting what he's got, 

As a rule, man's a fool. 

NEW SAW 

As a rule woman's wise, 

When she can't get what she wants, 
Then she cries, 

Man cannot withstand her tears, 

So he "gives up" to the dears, 
As a rule woman's wise, 

When she can't get what she wants, 
Then she cries. 

— Century. 

* * * 

After Commencement 
Starting on life's battle 

In the month of June; 
Grayce is in the parlor 

Pounding out a tune. 

Waging life's great warfare, 

Doughtiest of girls, 
May is in the hammock 

Reading tales of earls. 

Fighting life's hot contest 

With a heart of oak. 
Bill is on the golf field 

Practising a stroke. 

(Pa is in the office 

Toiling like a Turk, 
Ma is in the kitchen 

Doing up the work.) 



-New York Sun. 



* * * 



Sovind tHe Gong' 

If you want to win before you die, 
Don't waste time 

Pessimizing. 
Uplift your heart! Why drift and sigh? • 
There's wealth in 

Advertising. 
Life is so short, and death so long, 
And rivals 

Enterprising! 
Then grasp yo.ur chance. Shout! Sound the gong! 
Go in for 

Advertising. 

— Architects' and Builders' Journal. 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



A Last Spree 

Vnd also that I done it. 
warmly - 
Regarding ■, bunnet 

■ mean to say it', me 

And I will say just what I shall 
Unheeding of persuas 

I would have went downtown today, 

Although I hadn'l orter 
I hain't not got no more to say, 

Here comes the college darter. 

Tin- blissful phrases now I use 

Without a single stammer. 
The graduates will soon be home 
To knock the old man's grammar. 
* » * 
The Tree 
It shades us from the sun and storm 

Its branches wide we see, 
But mark the course of mortal life 
In ages of the tree. 

First on its trunk a lusty youth 

In most romantic part 
Entwined initials deftly carved. 

Surrounded by a heart. 

Time runs. The busy years fly by 

On pinions swift and true; 
He cuts a switch. Folks hear him say: 

"This hurts me worse than you." 

In lean and slippered pantaloon 

He hums an old refrain, 
And then for final age of all 

From it he cuts a cane. 

— New York Sun. 



Friday Luchy 

.•.luu Columbus first 
fool upon our soil; 
Friday when the river's gleam 
Rew arded 1 1 udsi mi's toil; 
'Twas Friday when the Pilgrim dads 

i in Plymouth set them doy n ; 
The Mayflower, on ,-i Friday morn, 

Sailed into Provincetown. 
\ii'l I i iday was the natal day 
Of "in- George Washington, 
Of Martin Luther, WinReld Scott 
And famous Stephenson. 

— Century. 

* * * 
Let It In 

When you're feelin' grouchy, 

Let the sunshine in; 
When your face gets feelin' hard. 

Crack it with a grin. 
Don't be 'fraid o' wrinkles, 

Tear loose with your mirth; 
Ati old face, laughter-wrinkled, 

Is the sweetest thing on earth. 

— Houston Post. 

* * * 
Trie Invitation 

The sweetest words 

We may divine 
Are: "Come on in; 

The water's fine." 

— New York Sun. 

* * * 

All but trie Dust 
"Papa, are we all worms of the dust, as the 
preacher said?" "Well, son, perhaps we're all 
worms, but some of us are shy on the dust." — Phil- 
adelphia Ledger. 













THE WAYSIDE PRESS 




214 FRANKLIN STREET 




Printers, Designers, Binders 


J~ffi\ 




The Character of the Work Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 




r—^ '? 




QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 








Home A 1853 -Phones— Main 1566 






PRINTING THAT TALKS 









■YOU TAKE A BIG RISK- 



When Your Dealer Says to You 



"We have our ow** ^icmd, which costs less because we 
don't have any advertising expense;" or, "This is just as good 
and costs less;" or, "We know this brand and recommend it. 
The kind you ask for costs more, and you couldn't tell the 
difference." 



If you take his advice nstead of insisting 
on the advertised brand 



You asked him for what you wanted — probably 
because advertising of one kind or another had 
convinced you. 

The manufacturer who did that advertising did it 
at considerable expense to prove to you that his 
goods were worth trying. 

If he didn't use every care to make them just as 
perfect as he knew how, he couldn't hope that they 
would convince you of their merit when you tried 
them. Yet he spent his money to reach you with 
his arguments, trusting to his goods to prove them. 

Isn't it pretty certain, then, that they are good of 
their kind? 

When he has created a general demand for his 
goods, in come the imitators, trading on his demand 
— the "just as good" and all the rest, with no care- 
fully built up reputation to preserve, no expensively 
bought business to endanger, and probably little or 
no expense in making the product they hope to sub- 
stitute for the advertised article. 

YOUR SAFETY lies in the advertised brand- 
back of it is the makers' guarantee and the maga- 
zine's guarantee. The Dealer who offers you some- 
thing "just as good" isn't good enough for you. Tell 
him his guarantee is not good enough a rod 



Have you ever traded at a store whose policy is 
never to advertise? Did it not try to convince you 
that its goods were cheaper than its competitors' — 
because it had no advertising bills to pay? Don't 
believe such arguments — go to the advertised store 
and see for yourself. 

ARE THESE FACTS VITAL TO YOU 

The advertised store has a better and more up-to- 
date stodfe-it turns its stock quickly by advertising 
and fills the^pace'with new goods. 

The advertised store has better and more ex- 
perienced clerks — it knows the goods it sells. 

The advertised store' ■ cheerfully rectifies all mis- 
takes — you go away feeling pleased and return with 
your friends. 

The advertised firm adopts the newest and best 
in every department, and conducts its business with 
a modern business system. 

The advertised store is invariably more reliable, 
and you can depend upon the quality of the goods 
it advertises. 

Can you find these things in the store whose policy 
is — never to advertise? 

Advertising is business promotion — it is the fuel 
that keeps the boilers hot — and the merchant who 
does it systematically is a Twentieth Century busi- 
ness man. 

He spends his money to convince you that the 
"■oods he advertises are as represented, and he will 
make good. Trade with the advertiser — purchase 
advertised goo'ds — they are more reliable and — cost 
no more. 



ASK AGAIN FOR WHAT YOU WANT 
'AND INSIST ON GETTING IT!!! - 



Los Angeles, California 



PREVENTION OF TUBERCULOSIS 



July 13. 1907 




!T1 



-V> 



r 



^!!aa^ 



m 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEARS* Z22 




Every day new ideas and styles are added to our millinery department. Some come from the leading 
fashion centers, others are the product of our own work rooms, each representing the very newest styles. 
Vacation time is at hand now and you will find in our stock just the kind of hat you need for your 
vacation* trip and you will find it marked at the price you want to pay. Visit this department. 




BROADWAY 



COR FITTM ST. 



Our Annual 



Summer Sale 



Z°fZ 



MILLINERY 

Every article in the store cut to half price- 
including the finest quality 
of 

...Hair Goods... 



Millinery, Toilet and Hair Parlors 
Scientific Facial Massage 



Home F 2370 



Teachers for California 

lt||IE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, fl If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-cpcrativc Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



m smm iMmmm. 



George Baker Anderson 

editor 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland Klnkald 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gatloupe 

manager' 1 .. — - 



Published every Saturday at 422*423 Chamber of Com* 
merce Build'.ng, Lot Angeles. California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.oo a year in advance. Jingle copy to 
cents on alt news stands: 

Entered it second-class matter April 6,1997, .11 the postoffice at Lob Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March ;, 1S79. 



Vol. J. 



Los Jtngelcs. Cal.,Juty 13, 1907 Mo. 2 



The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 

"We need clean, healthy newspapers, with clean, 
healthy criticism which shall be FEARLESS AND 
TRUTHFUL."— Theodore Roosevelt. 

COMMENT 

Announcement that the Southern California 
League for the Prevention of Tuberculosis has en- 
gaged in a practical work of education and protec- 
tion should interest every public-spirited man and 
woman on the Pacific coast. The league was or- 
ganized by a few leading physicians and citizens to 
whom the problem of the future effect of the "white 
plague" has presented itself insistently. These or- 
ganizers are busy persons who have given time they 
could ill afford to spare, and from a small beginning 
they have accomplished enough to prove how great 
is the demand for work on the broadest and most 
comprehensive lines. Within recent years there has 
been so much agitation concerning the danger of 

infection from the disease, which 
Philanthropic causes more than fifty per cent of 
Undertaking the deaths recorded in the United 

States, that an unreasoning fear of 
the malady has been created. Conditions have been 
produced that bring about serious hardships and 
cruel experiences for the unfortunate patients. In 
a part of the country which has become \ht Mecca 
for thousands of persons in search of health, the 
sane safeguarding of the public is a matter of first 
importance. It is no exaggeration to say that the 
future prosperity of California and the Southwest 
generally depends largely upon ability to control 



the spread of tuberculosis. The policy of turning 
away the diseased from the places which offer them 
relief and possibly long life is too heartless and too 
unjust to be considered. There is but one course to 
be pursued and that course offers kindly aid to the 
sick while it assures scientific protection for the 
sound in body. 

* * * 

Every rear a great army of men and women 
afflicted with the dreaded malady is poured into 
Southern California and vital statistics show how 
imperative is the call for preventive measures that 
will insure immunity from contamination. It is 
said that seventy per cent of all persons employed 
in the ordinary vocations of life are more or less 
infected with tuberculosis. If this be true and if 
annually this state receives thousands and even 
tens of thousands of refugees the need of immedi- 
ate action is apparent. The Southern California 
League for the Prevention of Tuberculosis should 
be the largest and most active organization in Los 
Angeles and its branches in various parts of the 

state should become immense vigilance 

Let All committees. In this issue of the Pa- 

Co-cperate cific Outlook readers will find the 

salient features of a report submitted 
by Mrs. Frances Reid Ferris, who has acted as visit- 
ing nurse for the last few weeks. A reading of this 
report will awaken the most indifferent citizen to a 
realization of his duty. The Pacific Outlook is in- 
tensely interested in this vital topic and from time- 
to time will publish articles dealing with the prog- 
ress of the work inaugurated by the league. All 
will appear with the authority of that organization 
of philanthropic men and women, whose member- 
ship includes, as will be seen by reference to the 
first article, published in this issue, many of the 
most prominent persons in Los Angeles and South- 
ern California. The league ought to receive the un- 
qualified support of all public-spirited citizens of 
Southern California. 

* * * 

The refusal of Captain Banning to serve as a 
member of the good roads commission, doubtless 
in deference to a well-recognized public sentiment 
which demanded that no member of that body 
should be a practical politician or a man identified 
in any manner with the Southern Pacific railroad; 
has helped to clarify the atmosphere : but there is 
one more thing that ought to be done before the 
people of Los Angeles county are asked to vote on 



Pacific Outlook 



the bond issue. Martin Marsh, the man responsible 
for Eldridge, a ward politician of the class which 
is in ill favor in Los Angeles, should follow the 
good example set by Captain Banning. The selec- 
tion of George H. Bixby in the place of Captain 

Banning leaves the personnel of 

Good Roads the commission reasonably ac- 

a Little Nearer ceptable. As it now stands but 

one of the three men is objection- 
able. The majority undoubtedly will make recom- 
mendations to the board of supervisors in accord- 
ance with the desire of the people who are to pro- 
vide the vast fund for the construction -of a good 
roads system in the county. Unless the supervisors 
violate the spirit of the law and act, in some in- 
stances, upon the recommendation of a minority 
in the commission, we may be assured of a reason- 
ably honest administration of the funds and the 
construction of the proposed highway system rela T 
tively free from graft. After the commission shall 
have gone over the ground and made its recom- 
mendations to the board there will be ample time in 
which to thresh out the question of voting or killing 
the bond issue. 

» * * 

The American friends of Japan are rapidly being 
alienated. The recent utterances of Admiral Saka- 
moto, one of the chief officers of the Japanese navy 
and a man who is known to stand close to the 
Mikado, will be generally regarded in this country 
as having been inspired, or partially so. If not 
acting as the mouthpiece of the government, he un- 
doubtedly felt sure that the opinions and sentiments 
he expressed would give slight offense to the Mika- 
do and the government. The slurs he cast upon 
the personnel of the American navy have stung 
Washington, and the chances are that the feeling 
among the officers and men in the navy has sud- 
denly become fully as unfriendly as has that of the 
constituted authorities at the national capital. 
When the patriotism of the American people — 
soldiers, sailors or civilians — is impugned or, worse 
still, declared to be a negative quantity, 
Japanese it naturally follows that in the first flush 
Jingoism of passion there are many who want to 
fight, just to show Japan that the proper 
patriotic spirit exists in this country. But war 
with the bragging and blustering Japanese should 
be avoided at almost any cost. The best way to 
treat that country at this time is to ignore the in- 
solent attitude of such officials as Sakamoto and 
the fire-eating leaders of the "opposition", awaiting 
a distinctly unfriendly move on the part of the re- 
sponsible heads of the government. In the mean- 
time, however, by all means let us keep our eves 
wide open and fortify ourselves against any contin- 
gencies that may arise. It hurts to be called un- 



patriotic and cowardly — that is to say it would hurt 
if the epithets came from the quarter in which 
authority is lodged ; but under the circumstances 
the United States will be fully warranted in as- 
suming toward the Japanese jingoes an attitude 
akin to that assumed by the moon toward, the bark- 
ing cur. Let's keep cool for awhile. 

* * * 

But if war should be forced upon us as the out- 
come of the belligerent attitude of the fool dis- 
turbers in San Francisco and the outpourings of a 
few Japanese who stand in the same relation to 
their government as the agitators and jingoes of 
America do to our own government, we will not be 
so badly off. It is true that some of the cities of the 
Pacific coast might suffer materially at the outset. 
Alarmists have predicted all sorts of dire things. 

Japan might give California, Ore- 
Worst That gon and Washington a jolt that 
Would Happen would cause a stampede eastward 

of their inhabitants. She might 
sack half a dozen of the most important cities of the 
coast and make a safe "get away", but that probably 
would be the worst that would happen. Her wars 
with China' and with Russia prove that she is a 
nation of humane instincts. No barbarous acts 
would be committed. Non-combatants would not 
materially suffer. And then — then Japan would pay. 
She would pay more dearly than Russia paid her, 
more dearly than France paid Germany, more dear- 
ly than any nation has paid another in modern 
times. 

* * * 

The mass meeting last Friday night at which a 
great body of men and women was addressed by 
Francis J. Heney, the intrepid prosecutor of the San 
Francisco grafters, was in some respects unique. A 
gathering which it was believed would be simply an 
indorsement of Mr. Heney's fight against corruption 
in the face of obstacles which to some men would 
appear almost insuperable was no more a pro- 
Heney than it was an anti-Otis demonstration. 
While many of the more conservative and 
temperate men who were present at this memorable 
meeting doubtless deplored the fact that 
Heney's it spontaneously assumed so personal a 
Address character, that it should do so was in- 
evitable. In coming to Los Angeles Mr. 
Heney visited the camp of his most violent enemy, 
the Los Angeles Times and its editor. No other 
newspaper in the state has assailed him so bitterly 
and so persistently. No other paper has directed 
its efforts so openly to an attempt to impugn his 
motives and to blacken his character. Almost from 
the opening of his first speech, delivered at the ban- 
quet in his honor by the Municipal League, Mr. 
Heney realized that what the people of Los Angeles 



Pacific Outlook 



demanded was not only a clearing up of the cruel 
charges which that paper had made against him, 
but his estimate of the Times and its responsible 
And tlie people got what they asked for. 

* 9 ♦ 

For the first time since the work at San Francisco 
■a the people of Los Angeles were abl 
listen to Mr. Ilcncv's version of the thrilling story. 
And his words carried conviction. To judgi 
human character the man's sincerity and honesty 
were must apparent. Those who were inclined to 
criticise him because of the personal nature of his 
talk probably lost sight, for the moment, 
Self- of the fact that he had invaded, the field 
Defense occupied by the enemy and that he had 
ample justification for acting in accord- 
ance with what lias been called "the first law of na- 
ture", self-defense. In the history of journalism no 
man employed in the noble work of punishing the 
authors of civic corruption, of criminals high or 
low. has had so much with which to contend as Mr. 
Heney has found in the editorial attitude of the 
newspaper to which he paid his respects in language 
which was indelibly burned into the memories of 
his iiearer-. 

* * * 

I in i point in regard to the attitude of the chief 
conspirators in San Francisco touched upon by Mr. 
Heney probably had not appeared to many of his 
auditors. After indictments had been returned 
against Calhoun, Mullaly and others identified with 
the United Railroads, the plea was made that the 
money paid to the supervisors, through Ruef. had 
been extorted. If this were true, why did not Cal- 
houn go to Heney at the beginning of the investiga- 
tion and, as a measure for self-protec- 
Extortion tion, give him information that would 
Nonsense have led to the conviction of Ruef and 
the supervisors on the charge of extor- 
tion? It should be borne in mind that it was not 
until after Heney's labors had reached that stage 
where Calhoun saw that his own indictment was 
practically assured that such a thing as extortion 
was suggested. If Calhoun were actually a victim 
of extortion and could have demonstrated the fact, 
the prosecution would have been placed in a most 
embarrassing position and public sentiment would 
have been with instead of against Calhoun. But 
Calhoun or his friends did not cry "extortion" until 
he saw the hand of Heney on the door of the peni- 
tentiary. 

* * * 

Mr. Heney emphasized the menace to the peace 
of the community to be found in such newspapers 
as the Times, which has done more than any other 
publication of large circulation in Southern Cali- 
fornia to foster the class spirit. Tapers actuated by 
such motives as those which apparently 



prompted the Times to assail labor and take coi 
ruptionists like Calhoun under its protecting wing 
and other papers which as bitterly arraign capital. 
regardless of whether it is employed legitimately or 

otherwise, are almost wholly responsible for the 

creation and nourishment of the vindic- 
Backs to tive spirit which characterizes thought- 
the Wall less men of botli classes. Papers of both 

classes are equally deserving of the epi- 
thet which Mr. Heney bestowed upon the Times — 
that of "intolerant bully." The capitalistic press are 
deserving of more censure, however, than some of 
those papers which take the most radical viewpoint 
in their defense of labor, for the former represent 
the aggressor. They began the fight. Those which 
advocate the most extreme measures for the sake of 
"getting square" with capital are, as was Mr. Heney 
last Friday night, acting in accordance with the 
natural law regarding self-defense. Their tactics 
are the logical and inevitable result of their having 
been driven to the point where they are forced to 
fight with their backs to the wall. 
* * * 

Regardless of the probable culpability of Patrick 
Calhoun as a party to the debauching of public 
officials in San Francisco, lovers of fair play will 
rejoice that he has won in the great strike inaugu- 
rated by the carmen in that city several months ago. 
This conspiracy on the part of a few "leaders" (not 
really leaders but bosses of the most dangerous 
stripe) among the honest laboring classes in the 
afflicted city is a thing which all fair-minded men 
deplored and condemned from the start. In the 
history of labor troubles in America there never 
has been a more unjustifiable strike than that which 
sought to undo the United Railroads of San Fran- 
cisco. In 'the face of its own voluntary pledges to 
the contrary, the carmen's union inaugurated the 

strike without first seeking an adjudi- 
In Justice cation of the differences, or pretended 
to Calhoun differences, between the railroads and 

the employes. "Arbitration" has been 
the demand of united labor for years ; and the order- 
ing of a strike without an effort to effect through 
arbitration a settlement of the issues manufactured 
for the very evident sake of embarrassing Calhoun 
was reprehensible in the highest degree. Even the 
notorious McCarthy, the arrant labor demagogue, 
is willing to admit that the union should be severely 
punished, but he halts at the idea of its death. The 
bitterest foe of Mr. Calhoun must admit that it is 
not he that is responsible for the prospective end 
of the carmen's union. That body has committed 
suicide — or perhaps it would be nearer the truth 
to say that it had been done to death by the labor 
bosses, the walking delegates, whose strangle-hold 
on its throat was obtained with hardly a word of 
the sufferer. 




Pacific Outlook 



The union of laboring men of whatever calling, 
whether carmen, bricklayers, printers, iron-workers 
or whatnot, we hold to be not only justifiable but 
necessary to the uplifting of legitimate labor. Capi- 
tal unites and crushes labor whenever the oppor- 
tunity presents itself. Labor can do nothing to 
save itself from oppression without effective organi- 
zation. But when labor and capital mutually agree 
that when differences arise between them there 
shall be a resort to that angel of peace which we 
have named arbitration, and 
Where Sympathy either party to a compact to this 
Is Wasted end willfully abandons the prin- 

ciple, violates the contract and 
employs brute force to compel the second party to 
the agreement to accede to its demands, the party 
which holds a solemn undertaking of this sort as 
worth less than the paper upon which it is written 
deserves scant courtesy at the hands of the other, 
and no sympathy whatever. From the beginning 
the sympathies of the Pacific Outlook have been, 
so far as the labor troubles in San Francisco are 
concerned, with Mr. Calhoun; but this sentiment 
goes no further. 

* * * 

While .Mr. Calhoun is to be congratulated and the 
striking carmen both condemned and commiserated 
—condemned for having violated a sacred compact 
to appeal to arbitration for the adjustment of all 
grievances, real or imaginary; commiserated for 
having been foolish enough to have allowed them- 
selves to be browbeaten, bulldozed and bossed by 
such scoundrels as Cornelius and other men of his 
stripe — this has nothing whatever to do with any- 
thing save the matter of the strike now practically 
a thing of the past. It is to be regretted , that two 

classes of individuals have confounded 

Who Is two distinct issues in San Francisco— 

To Blame? the strike and the bribery cases. These 

two classes of individuals are easily 
defined. One consists of unthinking persons; the 
other consists of knaves and those whose business 
is to foment strife between the classes. The first 
class of individuals is not worthy of a thought, now 
that the strike has gone into history. But the sec- 
ond is blameworthy for having endeavored by every 
trick known to the professional demagogue to mis- 
lead the public. But the sin of offenders of this 
latter class is finding them out. Little by little the 
intelligent readers have learned to identify truthful 
newspapers when they read them. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Times is a monstrous hypocrite. 
So completely is this proven by its political record 
that it would be a waste of effort to cite evidence 
to that end at this time. The Los Angeles Times 
likewise wilfully and deliberately seeks to mislead 



its readers when it declares that it is against "the 
'closed shop' and ALL FORMS OF ATTEMPTED 
MONOPOLY OF THE INDUSTRIES, BY 
WHOMSOEVER UNDERTAKEN." The Times, 

through the manager of its print- 

The Times • ing department, Mr. Johnson, be- 

and Monopoly came one of the chief organizers of 

the Franklin Association, a mo- 
nopoly of the worst form. Since the organization of 
the Franklin Association this representative of the 
Times has been a director in that association and 
one of its most active spirits. The Franklin Asso- 
ciation, more than any other similar organization 
in the country, has been responsible for boosting 
the prices asked for job printing until today the 
concerns identified with that trust charge more for 
job work than any other printing houses in the 
country. 

* * * 

Not only is the Times largely responsible for the 
organization of this trust and the raising of prices 
for commercial printing, but as a member of the 
trust its representative became active in the efforts 
put forth to induce concerns handling printing pa- 
per to refuse to sell this necessity to printing houses 
which declined to join the trust, if the Times and 
the other members of the Franklin Association had 
had their way, no independent printer in Los An- 
geles would now be able to purchase the paper 
necessary to the conduct of its business. One of 
the most striking items of evidence illustrating the 
iniquitous character of the Franklin Association 
was its inviolable rule that when a bid 
The Farce for printing was made by one of its 
of "Bids" members, such bid had to be laid be- 
fore a committee of the association be- 
fore its acceptance, and other members of the asso- 
ciation making bids WERE PROHIBITED FROM 
MAKING LOWER BIDS. Soon after 'the 
passage of the Cartwright anti-trust law the by-laws 
of the association were revised and submitted to 
District Attorney Fredericks, who is said to have 
passed upon them as being in accordance with the 
provisions of the new law. But until that time the 
Franklin Association existed as a monopoly in re- 
straint of trade. Since the trust has conformed to 
the new law, so far as its by-laws are concerned, it 
continues, however, to maintain essentially the old 
scale of prices which, for type-setting, are about 
double the prices asked by most independent 
printers. 

* * * 

Inasmuch as there still remains a definite under- 
standing among the printing houses which are 
affiliated with this trust (including the Los An- 
geles Times, let it be noted) that the schedule of 
prices shall remain practically as they were before 
the revision of the by-laws, is there nothing in the 



Pacific Outlook 



1 



wright law which demands thai the district at- 
torney attempt to break the monopoly, chartered or 
unchartered? But regardless of tlie legal aspects of 
the case the fact remains that the 'limes, which 
loudly pr> be "against all forms of attempt- 

ed monopoly of the industries, by whomsoever un- 
dertaken." is still a party to a mono- 
Rank poly which bears heavily upon the 
Hypocrisy business men of Los Angeles. Further 
than this, it may be remarked in pass- 
ing, it is notorious that < rtis will not permit the sale 
of the Herald unless the purchaser contract to carry 
out the policies outlined by him. so far as they bear 
upon the treatment to be accorded organized labor. 
It would appear from these facts that the head of 
the Times is not only a newspaper monopolist so 
far as it lies within his power to be one, but that he 
finds monopoly in the business of commercial print- 
ing profitable and to his liking, notwithstanding the 
assertions quoted from that paper. The Los An- 
geles Times is a rank hypocrite. 

* * * 

The report has been current upon the streets dur- 
ing the past few days that the control of the Even- 
ing News has been purchased either by General 
( >tis or Mr. Chandler. Some color of authority is 
lent to the rumor by the Times itself, which has 
suddenly taken to booming the News. The story- 
is interesting, if true. "The wolf 

The Wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and 

and the Lamb the leopard shall he down with the 
kid ; and the calf, and the young 
lion, and the fatling together; and a little child shall 
lead them." This is from an ancient piece of litera- 
ture. "The Times is against all forms of attempted 
monopoly of the industries, by whomsoever under- 
taken." This is from a modern piece of literature. 
The people may pay their money and take their 
choice. 

* * * 

In her paper before the Woman's Parliament held 
in Santa Monica last week Mrs. B. C. Davies of 
Monrovia had the courage of her convictions and 
she touched the keynote of much of the modern dis- 
content among women. In closing a witty address 
she said: "Know a little of everything, devour 
books like bonbons, and review them to your heart's 
content ; write papers on protoplasm and the fixed 

stars ; yea, traverse the whole field 
Attainment of of the intellectual, the social and 
Nothingness the literary, but let me cry aloud 

mother something, or you are lost 
and your labor is worse than vain. Though I speak 
with the tongues of men and of angels, though I 
have the gift of prophesy, though 1 have faith to re- 
move mountains, and understand all mysteries and 
have not love, I am nothing, and you may multiply 



nothing into clubs, ami societies, and organize the 
aggregated nothings into federations and the result 

will still be nothing." 

* * * 

In every normal woman the ruling instinct is to 
"mother" something. Now that childless marriages 
are so common the maternal impulse is often ex- 
pressed toward the husband, wdio is too frequently 
dominated. This tendency has caused foreigners to 
comment upon the apparent submission of the 
stronger sex to the weaker in America, but in the 
rapid evolution of society thoughtful persons have 
reason to consider the American husband's inclina- 
tion to permit his wife to rule as 
After a Man much better for the nation than 
Has "Arrived" the expression of the maternal im- 
pulse upon dumb pets or youthful 
geniuses. Ten years ago the lap dog, the caged 
bird and the orphan asylum were the usual recipi- 
ents of motherly care, but the unblessed matrons 
who move in exclusive circles where afternoon teas 
and bridge whist furnish so called recreation re- 
cently have exhibited a preference for immature 
geniuses or older celebrities. The older celebrities 
are less in vogue than the immature geniuses be- 
cause after a man has "arrived" he has little time 
to be patronized by idle women. 

* * * 

When Mrs. Davies told her hearers to "mother" 
something she should have added "something that 
needs mothering." This brings the subject down 
to a frank facing of facts, and it must be acknowl- 
edged that actual motherhood is the only experi- 
ence which brings to woman her highest realiza- 
tion of life and her best development of her own 
■character. Motherhood means 
Best Kind 'self sacrifice — service in its full- 
of "Mothering" est significance. The wife who 
has none of the responsibilities, 
the anxieties and the discipline of rearing her own 
children misses that universal education by which 
.the spirit comes into its best heritage. The love 
that makes all things possible to the mother is the 
tremendous force which has caused to be written 
upon the pages of history records of heroic deeds 
and supreme achievements. 

* * * 

Judge Landis may fine the Standard Oil Com- 
pany thirty millions of dollars and the fine may be 
collected, but that won't put an end to the system 
of robbery in which that great corporation has been 
engaged for years. Why? Simply because Stan- 
dard Oil. after having paid the fine— if the court of 
last resort compel it to do so — very easily will 
reimburse itself by raising the price of the necessity 
in which it traffics. The people themselves will be 



Pacific Outlook 



the ultimate sufferers, just as they have been in the 
past. The thirty millions will 
Rock Pile for come out of the pockets of con- 
the Rockefellers sumers of oil, from which that 
amount and a few hundreds of 
millions besides have been stolen. The only way 
in which adequate punishment can be measured out 
to Standard Oil is to put its Rockefellers, its 
Rogerses, its Archbolds and its Harrimans where 
the Ruefs, the Schmitzes and the Calhouns are go- 
ing. The rock pile is the only form of punishment 
that will put a stop to the iniquities of which these 
rascals are the authors. They can compel consumers 
to pay the fines assessed against Standard Oil but 
they cannot compel consumers to don stripes and 
act as their proxies in the penitentiary. 

* * * 

The Portland Oregonian, the chief newspaper of 
the Pacific coast and one of the really great news- 
papers of America, sees great improvement in the 
character and conduct of members of the legisla- 
ture of Oregon since the introduction of the prim- 
ary election system of making nominations and the 
adoption of the referendum principle. "The legis- 
latures of years gone by have been the ruin of many 
of their members," declares the Oregonian. "Going 
to Salem from quiet towns where they lived re- 
spectable lives, the members were thrown into the 

company of lobbyists and em- 
How It Works ployes of senatorial candidates and 
In Oregon were wined and dined as they 

never were before. In forty days 
of fast living many of them acquired new ideas of 
life and were never of use to themselves or their 
families afterward. Many a man who went to the 
legislature rich in reputation returned to his home 
a bankrupt. Boodle and booze did the work. This 
session seems to have started out on a high plane, 
with no liquor in evidence and no one entertaining 
lavishly or trying to exert an improper influence 
upon the members." California will come to the 
Oregon idea in time. Human nature is the same in 
one state as in the other. 

* * * 

Nelson Smith, the young man who made a sensa- 
tion at the Santa Barbara Fourth of July celebra- 
tion by appearing as the Goddess of Liberty, has 
had a chance to laugh at the susceptible youths who 
sought his smiles as he passed in all the magnifi- 
cence of flowing robes and jewel-decked 
Fooled blonde tresses. When the girl who had 
the Boys promised to appear as the goddess felt 
that the ordeal was too severe, young- 
Smith saved the pageant by "making up" for the 
occasion. His beauty is said to have been so 
"compelling'' that he was the recipient of many at- 
tentions. At the next Fiesta in Los Angeles he 



ought to be able to -find a place in which he may 
add to the number of his conquests. 

* * * 

News that Myra Kelley, the clever writer whose 
stories of the school children of New York's East 
Side have made her famous, is now deeply inter- 
ested in a scheme for the development of Oldchester 
village and farm in the Orange mountains, will be a 
disappointment to the real estate dealers of South- 
ern California. Since Myra Kelly's marriage — she 
is now Mrs. MacLaughton — she has been seeking a 
place in which to make practical certain plans for 
the "simple life," and inasmuch as her brother has 

become a resident of Los Angeles 
Plans for the there were hopes — but that is an- 
"Simple Life" other story. Mrs. MacLaughton 

has established at Oldchester a 
home that is most picturesque. This home is one of 
forty that will cluster about an old fashioned Eng- 
lish inn where the members of the little community 
can meet to dine. The inn enables the happy in- 
habitants of Oldchester to be quite independent of 
servants. Plans similar to this one now being car- 
ried out in the Orange mountains have been dis- 
cussed for Southern California, but, so far, no 
capitalist has had the courage to make what is 
considered rather a discouraging experiment owing- 
to the danger of inharmonies in the close associa- 
tion of families. 

* * * 

Those residents of California — more especially 
we have in mind certain persons in Los Angeles— 
who would seek the financial assistance of the laird 
of Skibo Castle, Andrew Carnegie, in the prospec- 
tive new public library building to be erected in this, 
city, should be interested in the following from a 
review of "Freedom in America" from the pen of 
Charles Wibley, a British traveler and critic of 
American institutions: "So, ignoring the peculiar 
enslavements of democracy, forgetting the tempta- 
tions to which the noblest republic is exposed, they 
proclaim a monopoly of the sovereign virtue, and 
cast a cold eye of disdain upon the tradition of older 
countries. The author of 'Triumphant 
American Democracy,' for instance, asserts that 
"Peers" . he 'was denied political equality by his. 
native land.' We do not know for what 
offense he was thus heavily punished, and it is con- 
soling to reflect that the beloved republic has made' 
him 'the peer of any man.' It has not made any- 
other man his peer, as the episode of Homestead 
vividly reminds us. He is separated far more wide- 
ly by his wealth from the workmen, whom he pa- 
tronizes, than the meanest day-laborer in England 
from the dukes to whom he is supposed to bend the 
knee ; and if Mr. Carnegie be the fine flower of 
American Liberty, we need not regret that ours is 
of another kind." It is well that we see ourselves. 



Pacific Outlook 



occasionally, as others see us; and here is one in- 
stance in which all America ought to plead guilty. 

* * * 

The Common Council of Milwaukee has begun 
an investigation to uncover the reasons why so 
many boys and girl- "go wrong." Among the 
various agencies which Milwaukee people hold re- 
sponsible for the corruption of young people are the 
following: Undesirable home influences, the penny 
arcade and its tendency to promote flirtations, etc.; 
the five-cent theaters, because they promote the 
habit of hanging about the streets and forming 

chance acquaintances ; sensa- 

Why the Young tional displays on billboards; 

"Go Wrong" poolrooms and bowling alleys 

which allow young boys to loaf 
in them ; lack of supervision of boarding houses 
which advertise rooms to let and allow- young girls 
to rent them ; the inadequate enforcement of the 
compulsory education and child labor laws and of 
laws prohibiting the sale of liquors and cigarettes 
to minors, and the attendance of young girls at 
.saloon dance halls without their guardians' pres- 
ence; inadequate laws restricting disorderly houses 
and the poor enforcement of such laws on this sub- 
ject as exist ; and finally, lack of opportunities for 
wholesome enjoyment, such as public playgrounds 
and social centers. 

* * * 

In the last clause may be found one of the most 
important causes of complaint and suggestion for a. 
remedial measure which has appealed strongly to 
Los Angeles, though not yet stronglv enough. If 
we give our boys, especially the children of the 
poorer classes, places where they ma)' play ball 
without being forced to keep constantly on the 
lookout for a police officer, and where children of 
both sexes may engage in other beneficial pastimes 
under the protection of the law, we will have ar- 
rived very near to the solution of this question. 
Many of the suggestions coming from Milwaukee 

already have been acted upon by 

Playgrounds Los Angeles, and -others are now un- 

a Solution der discussion. We have here very 

fair ordinances governing the cheap- 
er places of amusement, poolrooms, rooming houses 
of bad repute, etc., but it must be confessed that 
the local laws have not always been enforced as 
they should have been. We have not invariably put 
into practice the high principles enunciated by the 
City Council — sometimes they have been pure 
buncombe measures, we fear — but we arc receiving 
evidence of a more enlightened public spirit, and 
most of these things will come in time. Los An- 
geles probably is about as well regulated, in respect 
to most of these conditions complained of in Mil- 
waukee, as other progressive American cities; but 
there is little danger that a city growing as rapidly 
as we are may become any too good. 



Sharlot M. Hall, whose articles descriptive of the 

\\ esl have won for her a national reputation, is fa-t 
becoming recognized as one of the most entertain- 
ing writers of western fiction as well. Much of her 

besl work appears in ( hit West magazine. In the 
July number of that periodical there is a fascinat- 
ing storj entitled "Fourth of Jul) iii Cowland." It 

describes the methods adopted b) the cowpunchcrs 
of the Southwest for the entertainment of their 
friends and themselves. Broncho "busting" and 
Steer tying are two typical forms 
Fourth of July of sport indulged in by the men 
in Cowland who are engaged in the rough la- 
bor of handling the cattle of the 
mountains and plains west of the Mississippi. In 
the Rocky mountain district these arts have reached 
perfection. Visitors from the East miss the great- 
est entertainment the mountain country offers if 
they pass through the fascinating habitat of the 
cowboy without witnessing a tournament in which 
experts in this form of labor and play combined 
participate. Those who have not been fortunate 
enough to witness an event of this character will be 
highly entertained by Miss Hall's graphic story in 
Out West. 

* * * 

Arizona Defends Heney 

Arizona people are rising to the defense of 
Francis J. Heney. The Tucson Citizen says : 

"Much local interest attaches to the attacks made 
upon Francis J. Heney in the Los Angeles Times, 
based upon Mr. Heney's alleged record in Arizona. 

"For reasons of its own the Los Angeles paper 
has raked over the ashes of a long dead and almost 
forgotten affair which occurred nearly twenty years 
ago in Tucson. At the time the Henev-Handy' duel 
was a cause-celebre. It was one of those deplorable 
affairs where one man found it necessary to take the 
life of another, in self-defense. Eye witnesses to 
the meeting exonerate Heney, as did the coroner's 
jury. Handy was a man of violent disposition and 
had repeatedly threatened to kill Henev. That' his 
threats were not to be taken lightly can be testified 
to by many now living in Tucson'. It is probable 
that no one regretted the necessitv for the shooting 
more than did Mr. Heney. 

"As an indication of the feeling in this section 
there may be cited a telegram sent" to the Times by 
Hon. R. R. Richardson, of Patagonio, immediately 
after the publication of the 'Arizona record' story. 
It read as follows: 'Los Angeles Times, Los An- 
geles, Cal. I am a friend of Henev, Spreckels, 
Burns and good government. Your complete switch 
against good government makes your paper dis- 
gusting. Stop mine. Heney has" fifty friends in 
Arizona to one his detractors have.' 

"The course of the brilliant special prosecutor in 
the San Francisco graft investigation has been 
watched with the greatest interest in Arizona and 
his many friends are indignant that malicious 
garbled accounts of happenings in Tucson and else- 
where in the territory should be used in an attempt 
to discredit his work and asperse his character. 

"The source of the information supplied the 
Times, if laid bare, it is said, would sufficiently 
establish its malicious falsity. Had the Times 
wished accurate information it could most readily 
have secured it." 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



President ScHaeffer's Address 



By Wie,hei,mina Sheriff Bain 

The fiftieth anniversary convention of the Na- 
tional Educational Association was worthily opened 
on Monday afternoon, July 8. Every seat of the 
vast and beautiful Temple Auditorium was oc- 
cupied; prayer and welcome, and a glorious tribute 
of music attuned America's representative educa- 
tionists to felicitous levels ; and the presidential ad- 
dress was a masterpiece of powerful and humani- 
tarian oratory. 

President Schaeffer answered the question: How 
can the School Aid the Peace Movement? He told 
that three conventions of mighty import are in 
simultaneous conference: The international tri- 
bunal of the Hague, the Jamestown exposition — 
"the greatest display of military force ever made 
in times of peace," and — in the City of the Angels, 
on the Pacific coast — a convocation of teachers from 
every part of the United States. He stated that in 
this country there are 500,000 teachers, and that 
there are 3,500,000 teachers in the world; and he 
asserted the potency of such a body — so numerical- 
ly and so qualitatively strong — to introduce and to 
establish universal peace. 

But he dwelt on the literature and the ideals with 
which, as a rule, teachers concern themselves; the 
drum and trumpet sort of history which ought to be 
swept from the lower schools, and that kind of 
patriotism which is the meanest of all the virtues. 
Instead of glorifying the successful general it will 
be advantageous to study what the artist, the in- 
ventor, the jurist, the philanthropist are doing for 
the world. Instead of chanting : "My country, right 
or wrong !" let us instil cosmic thought, so that, 
even as the bully is despised, the nation may be de- 
spised which is ever ready to fight at the expense 
of weaker nations. Contrast Pasteur with Napol- 
eon, and know that the drying of a tear may be a 
grander deed than the shedding of seas of gore. 
John Jay was burned in effigy in Boston because he 
advocated resort to arbitration ; but since his day 
two hundred international disputes have been ad- 
justed by that only logical method, and there are 
now forty-four treaties binding nations to settle by 
arbitration any misunderstanding's that may here- 
after arise between them. 

Do Canada and the United States instigate and 
nurture mutual defiance and hate by bristling forts 
and belching ironclads? No! According to the 
treaty of 1817 four toy vessels lie moored in the 
separating waters — while mutual amity and esteem 
smile across ' the sparkling frontier. Chile and 
Argentine have erected on their majestic boundary 
line a statue of Jesus Christ, in token and com- 
memoration of their resolve to quit forever the dis- 
sensions that for many years distracted them. One 
man, in an impassioned sermon, inspired those 
Latin countries with fraternal regard. - 

But peace, it has been objected, will give us a 

ace of weaklings. "Who shall dare," demanded 
the splendidly virile orator, "to call William Penn 
a weakling!" 

And the great audience applauded as from the 
very roots of consciousness and sympathetic con- 
viction. 

It is inconceivable that an address so well chosen 



and so' fittingly delivered, by a Pennsylvanian, shall 
fail of its purpose. Not only have the teachers 
of the United States become pledged to the incul- 
cation of national and international peace and arbi; 
tration, but the whole world shall know their deter- 
mination. In direct and immediate' sequence of 
President Schaeffer's address, a series of resolutions 
are being transmitted to the Hague which notify 
all the nations that the National Educational 
Association of America stands, and shall stand, for 
the solidarity of humanity. . 



The present administration of Indian affairs is 
outspoken in its resolve to break down every bar- 
rier which isolates the red folk. In the picturesque 
and vigorous language of Commissioner Leupp : 
"We want to take the Indian out of the category of 
curios ; we want to make him a citizen." 

This is admittedly impossible, as well as undesir- 
able, in regard to the Indian of the passing genera- 
tion ; but with the boys and girls an excellent start 
really has been made. The demonstrations given 
in the normal school within the last few days have 
shown that these young people are learning to ex- 
press themselves in spoken and written English, 
and are at the same time becoming expert in cook- 
ing, laundry work, dressmaking, music, alalfa till- . 
age, orange culture, etc. Their native aptitudes in 
coloring and designing are not neglected in the long 
array of industries and accomplishments to which 
they have been so successfully introduced, as a 
visit to the Indian exhibit now adorning' the gal- 
leries of the normal school will abundantly testify. 

Granting that there is much to be deplored in our 
past relationships toward the autochthons of 
America, it may be conceded that good will yet en- 
sue, and that every honest effort we now make is 
at once an atonement and an assurance of future 
mutuality. 



Leading Women of the N. E. A. 

Prominent among the N. E. A. visitors are many 
women of national reputation. Mrs. Ella Flagg 
Young, who enjoys the distinction of being the only 
woman at the head of a normal school, has made 
the most of her quarter century's experience as an 
instructor. A native of Buffalo, New York, she 
was educated in Chicago, the city with which her 
useful life has been identified. From 1887 to 1899 
she was district superintendent of schools and from 
1899 to 1905 she had a chair in the University of 
Chicago. Since 1905 she has been principal of the 
Chicago Normal school. Always an inspiring force 
she has held the most sincere regard of the mem- 
bers of her profession. The women principals of 
the Chicago elementary schools have an organiza- 
tion named for her and he has been the recipient . 
of many honors. She is the author of half a dozen 
books on education. 

Mrs. Helen Grenfell of Colorado won fame as 
state superintendent of public instruction. She 
served three terms with such success that she has 
been permanently attached to educational work and 
is now connected with the State Agricultural Col- 
lege. Mrs. Grenfell is a clever, tactful woman of 
fine appearance and pleasant manners. She is a 
leading club woman and at the Ebell reception 
Thursday was a prominent figure. 

Miss Estelle Carpenter of San Francisco, an au- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



thoritv cm the pedagogical side of music, is one ol 
the most progressive of the educators. She is hand- 
. enthusiastic and practical. Her address on 
"The Vitalizing of the Child Through Song" was 
one of the significant features of a strong 
gramme. 

Mrs. Sarah Hyre ami Miss Emma C. Davis rep- 
resent the schools "i" Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Hyre 
is a member of the school board and Miss Davis is 
a district superintendent. 

Miss Grace E. Barnard, head of the Kindergarten 
Training School of « lakland, made a fine impression 
Tuesday when she led a discussion of kinder- 
gartens. 

Miss Alice Mary Phillips, who acted as assistant 
secretary at the X. E. A. Headquarters, has made 
for herself a reputation as a writer. Her fame was 
won in the most unexpected manner. She was 
asked to put together data collected by Dr. E. C. 
Moore, Martin C. Xeuner and Robert O. Hoedel so 
that it could he used in a guide hook. Miss Phillips, 
who is a graduate f the University of California, 
did her hest with wdiat school girls call "informing 
articles." She wrote so simply and so entertaining- 
ly that the visitors who paused to look at the 200 
illustrations pored over the printed pages. Then it 
was discovered that a guide book could be as fas- 
cinating as a novel. The modest assistant secretary 
awoke to find herself the envy of every newspaper 
writer in town. 

* * * 

Studying the Sun at Mount Wilson 

The other day Dr. Otto Klotz of the Government 
scientific staff in Canada, speaking of our remark- 
able spring, with its heavy snowfall early in May 
and some snow late in the month, explained the or- 
dinary weather phenomena and told how it is that 
the weather bureaus can predict from what has be- 
gun to happen what is going to happen. He re- 
ferred to the area of "high barometer," or high at- 
mospheric pressure, that was persistent in the North- 
west last spring as a place where the heavy air was 
piled up like mountain ranges and kept pouring 
down the slope toward the valley of light air or low 
pressure, bringing with it the cold air of the upper 
regions, which was distributed far and wide over 
the continent ; but he added that we do not know 
why this air persisted in piling itself up skyhigh in 
the Northwest. Weather science has gone just so 
far that we know fairly well what the weather will 
be tomorrow, but why it is not the same as last 
year we do not know. 

The mystery is involved in the workings of the 
great furnace, the sun ; and Dr. Klotz said that until 
we understand its inner operations we cannot hope 
to give a satisfactory explanation as to the "why" of 
weather. The trouble is that though we know 
much about the sun there is a great deal more we do 
not know. The furnace docs not seem to be fed 
regularly. We do not know how it is run or what 
kind of heating material is used; and we are not yet 
able to measure the amount of heat poured out on 
a given area. 

These, says the New York Sun, are among the 
problems of solar physics that are now being vigor- 
ously attacked; and the most promising and com- 
prehensive investigation is that in progress at 



Mount Wilson, Cal., under the auspices of the L'ar- 
ie Institution. In his report fur [905 President 
\\ oodward said that among all the projects of the 
institution the solar observatory it was establishing 
at Mount Wilson ranked first in cost of construc- 
tion and equipment; hut the cost was no more than 
commensurate with the magnitude of the problem, 
which was that of the physical constitution of the 
sun and its role in the solar and stellar systems of 
the visible universe. 

Mount Wilson, in Southern California, s.886 feet 
high, attracted attention a few years ago as offer- 
ing remarkably favorable conditions for astronomi- 
cal work because of the great amount of clear 
weather and the low humidity and wind movement. 
In the summer of 1904 132 days out of 136 were 
perfectly suitable for observations. The Carnegie 
Institution secured a lease of this mountain for 
ninety-nine years, and a number of buildings were 
erected for the staff of observers. It would not do 
to transport delicate instruments costing many 
thousands of dollars over the rough trail, and so 
$15,000 was expended in building a good road to the 
summit. Up to September 30 last tbe sum of $150,- 
000 had been expended from the Institution funds 
for the construction and maintenance of the solar 
observatory. The work is under the direction of 
Professor George E. Hale. 

The attack on the solar problem is now in full 
progress along three converging lines. The sun is 
being studied as a typical star ; the stars and nebulae 
are being investigated, both to learn more of them 
and to ascertain their relationship to the sun and to 
one another ; and interpretations of both solar and 
stellar phenomena are being sought through care- 
fully chosen laboratory experiments. The prob- 
ability has been emphasized that the quantity of 
radiant heat received from the sun by the outer lay- 
er of the earth's atmosphere in a unit of time is not 
continent, where their use on all passenger locomo- 
constant. Last year the physical laboratory was 
completed, and by its means many phenomena ob- 
served in the sun may be produced artifically and 
thus studied deliberately and repeatedly. 

The observatory is to have this year great addi- 
tions to its apparatus. For many months artificers 
have been engaged in perfecting the mountings and 
equipment of the sixty inch reflecting telescope, 
which will greatly add to the efficiency of observa- 
tion ; and John D. Hooker of Los Angeles has con- 
tributed $45,000 to meet the cost of a mirror of fifty 
feet focal length and one hundred inches aperture, 
which will collect 2.7 times as much light as the 
sixty inch reflector and permit the w : ork of the ob- 
servatory to be vastly extended. It will be possible, 
for example, to photograph an immense number of 
nebulae and other objects so large and clearly that 
they may be satisfactorily studied. 

Probably no work in- pure science is of greater 
interest than that now in progress at Mount Wil- 
son. It will be a milestone in the advance of knowl- 
.edge if the human intellect may some day grasp the 
full meaning of the sun's phenomena and under- 
stand the laws that govern them and the cause and 
meaning of their vagaries. It is toward the solu- 
tion of the solar problem that this observatory is 
striving ; and its efforts may lead to far clearer con- 
ceptions than we now possess of how weather is 
made. 



12 Pacific Outlook 

TUBERCULOSIS AMONG THE POOR 



The Trag'edy in the RanKs of Indigent Sufferers in Southern California 



By Frances Rbid Ferris, R. N. 

(The Southern California League for the Prevention of Tuberculosis has begun a practical work 
among the poor, of Los Angeles. This work is the beginning of a campaign of education that will 
reach persons of every class. The league is fortunate in procuring the aid of Mrs. Frances Reid Ferris, 
a college woman of the broadest education and the widest experience, who has volunteered her ser- 
vices as visiting nurse. After being graduated from Johns Hopkins University Mrs. Ferris became 
interested in settlement work in New York and later went into the slums of London, where she de- 
voted several busy years to the helping of the unfortunate. Her report to the league, an abstract of 
which follows, will be a revelation to residents of Los Angeles. The officers of the league are: Presi- 
dent, C. B. BoOthe, Los Angeles; vice-president, Dr. John C. King, Banning, Cal.; treasurer, W. C. 
Patterson, Los Angeles; secretary, Dr. Chas. C. Browning, Monrovia; directors, Dr. W. Jarvis Barlow, 
Miss Helen Barnard, Dr. H. G. Brainard, Dr. Norman Bridge, Dr. B. F. Church, Dr. Geo. L. Cole, F. 
M. Coulter, C. C. Desmond, Dr. L. M. Powers, Dr. Geo. H. Kress, Frank W. King, Dr. R. W. Miller, 
Thomas J. Stewart, Dr. W. Le M'oyne Wills, W. C. Patterson, Prof. J. H. Francis, Los Angeles; 
M'rs. Florence Collins Porter, South Pasadena; Dr. F. M. Pottenger, Monrovia; Dr. John L. Dryer, 
Santa Ana; Dr. Gayle G. Moseley, Redlands; Mrs. Emma Greenleaf, Long Beach; Dr. J. M. Rade- 
baugh, Dr. F. C. E.' Mattison, Dr. J. H. McBride, Dr. Geo. E. Abbott, Pasadena, Dr. Charlotte Baker, 
San Diego, and Dr. Rose Bullard, Los Angeles. — Editor.) 



For the past six weeks I have been visiting the 
tuberculous poor in their homes for purposes of re- 
lief and to study conditions. Seeking to acquaint 
myself with the records of the Helping Station of 
the Southern California League for the Prevention 
of. Tuberculosis, my quest was rewarded by finding 
a list of 145 poor consumptives who had received 
assistance through the Helping Station's philan- 
thropy since its inception last August. Each name 
enrolled headed a quota of details of the sort that 
go to make up a quantity which admits of neither 
exact measurement nor accurate numerical state- 
ment in determining their harmful results in a com- 
munity. With an eager craving for power octuple 
in potential capacity and competency to" reach out 
and produce results for community safeguard as 
well as physical redemption of these poor un- 
fortunates, I applied myself to evolving an intrin- 
sically consistent line of action that would con- 
sociate with the unique combination of civic condi- 
tions I must meet in such an undertaking. 

Conversant with my 145 distinct, group of facts, 
each assemblage regnant of conditions and circum- 
stances aggregating a hypothesis of unsuccessful 
battle with a preventable disease, I was stirred by 
145 reminders of what Southern California sunshine 
does not mean to the poor consumptive, while to 
Los Angeles they exemplified 145 sources with 
countless tributaries for contaminating localities 
and spreading tuberculosis. 

Besides the desperately poor consumptive, my 
list includes those in more favorable circumstances 
while they work, but who would be in most strait- 
ened positions the moment, they ceased to be wage- 
earners. 

The desperately poor cases, while sad, need not 
be regarded as hopeless. We can do much for them 
through a properly organized Helping Station and 
corps of private physicians with a great love for 
their fellowmen and enthusiasm in their work. 

In the course of my investigations, I look into 
the home environment and point out the hygienic 
pathway. Through various charitable organiza- 
tions, funds, food and clothing have been obtained 
in extreme cases. Special attention has been given 
to the children in families visited that they may not 
become infected. I find patients of this class in- 
variably underfed, and what they do eat is mainly 



unwholesome and innutritious — pie, tea and cake 
forming the principal part of the dietary. I can re- 
arrange and form a decent bedroom that will afford 
the maximum of fresh air and sunshine out of deep- 
est squalor and chaos, but I am baffled frequently 
and sorely troubled with this problem of insufficient 
feeding, and, in -my opinion, we shall not make 
much headway against tuberculosis among cases 
living in lodging-houses, rickety shacks and cheap 
tenements, until we devise some adequate means 
whereby they can be properly and fully fed. Of 
what avail my care and instructions with a food 
supply all unequal to the needs of the patient and 
the disease? I have a number of cases where, could 
I only alter the dietary, restoration to an improved 
condition would be promptly promoted. To be 
visited and cared for inspires these unfortunates 
with confidence and hope — gentle and masterful ar- 
rangement of surroundings creates a desire to carry 
out the suggestions of sunshine by day, fresh air 
by night and day, rest while there is fever, care and 
destruction of the sputa, proper bathing, etc. When 
I reach the matter of diet, like Phrosine, battling 
with the waves to reach the rock and the torch, my 
beacon fails me and I am limply stranded in a sea 
of perplexities. Frequently it is not only devising 
ways and means for the patient, but for the whole 
family, and in one case that means nine. 

Facing a larder devoid of even the traditional 
bone, with a pocket collapsed by "absolute 
vacuum," one poor fellow announced, "I'll just wait 
around the corner awhile. I'll find some one, I 
guess, who'll let me have a little." He was under 
an old comfort on a sort of settee viewing his sur- 
roundings with an impassive philosophy acquired 
through long continued suffering only. A cotton 
shirt and a much defaced red flannel undergarment 
hung from the window sill within the room, while 
a ragged pair of hose dangled from -the handle of an 
old frying pan made stationary by closing the win- 
dow down on it, which left, a mere crack for the en- 
trance of fresh air. Taking advantage of one of 
his landlady's temporary absences, he had washed 
out some of his wearing apparel, which left him 
with so abbreviated a wardrobe a sense of propriety 
prohibited him from going outside to hang them on 
the line. When I found him he was trying to trim 
his beard before a broken bit of glass. The atmo- 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



sphere of the room was foul ami loathsome, \ 
dirty piece of carpet on the floor beside In- bench 
held' a newspaper doing duty as cuspidor. Count- 
flies covered and hovered above the sputa, 
numerous agents t" set in active operation manj 
channels for tubercular infection. A pine box 
served as a chair, and with the exception of the old 
settle against the wall no vestige of furniture was 
in the room. The window was destitute of any 
curtain before it so the sun streamed hot and ener- 
vating through its begrimed panes. Through the 
mutations of ill-fortune, sick and hungry, with a 
high fever, he lay sweltering under his heavy cover- 
ing, shrinking from observation, fearing miscon- 
struction, ji scourge to mankind, yet his compulsory 
misery called forth no protest — he was patiently 
waiting for his clothes to dry that he might stand 
on the street-corner to watch and hope for the 
friend to come along with inclination and means to 
accommodate. 

Entering his room by complying with his bidding 
in answer to my knock. I explained that I had been 
visiting a neighbor who was a little bit under the 
weather that morning, and he had asked me to drop 
in and see him. 

"Yesm'm." lie said, "thank you. I've heard about 
you, but I do not believe y r ou can do anything for 
me — it would be like trying to brighten the tomb of 
a dot;.'' 

Thinking that a dog, even the meanest cur, de- 
served a better tomb than that hovel, I replied, "But 
I don't care anything about dogs this morning, 
while I do care about you." 

Here a violent paroxysm of coughing interrupted. 
"Do you think I could get well?" he questioned. 

"I think," I replied, "you could be made very cool 
and comfortable this hot morning, and that would 
be a valuable step along the road to improvement." 
He replied wistfully, "That would be mighty nice, 
but I don't well see how you could make me cool 
in this place." He was told he was not to bother 
his head about anything- just then — merely to be 
quiet and leave all mental effort to me. 

Stepping into the passage-way I found the land- 
lady had returned and was evidently talking matters 
over with several of the neighbors who had con- 
gregated for that purpose. It developed that be- 
cause the landlady was afraid of tuberculosis, she 
had stripped this poor lodger's room of every com- 
fort. She knew it was "contagious," she said, and 
she didn't want to have her things spoiled. Brieflv 
I explained to the party assembled that the tubercu- 
losis patient is not a danger if he knows his condi- 
tion and is careful. If he does not know his condi- 
tion and is not careful, then is he a danger. Ex- 
plaining what I wanted to do, many willing hands 
offered assistance, for they were glad to help. At 
the end of two and a half hours, my patient was 
back in his room refreshed in body and mind. The 
walls and floors of the room had been thoroughly 
cleaned and the window washed. A bit of calico 
before it served for a curtain and some netting an- 
swered for a screen to keep out the flics. A bed 
spring and several comfortables covered with a 
fresh sheet made a much better resting place than 
the hard bench, and the patient was enjoving the 
change. Two chairs replaced the old pine box, a 
cup with a five per cent solution of carbolic was 
for the expectorations. A hath and some nourish- 



ment had also added to In- personal well-being. 

This woman did not mean to be unkind, yet her 
treatment of her poor sick lodger was shocking, be- 
cause she was afraid of contracting tuberculosis. 
She now knows how to protect herself and others 
from the disease, is proud of the knowledge and 
proving herself a valuable influence for sanitary 
good m her locality. The neighbors now come to 
see her sick lodger and perform nice little helps, 
lie is progressing and' life is brighter for him. 

Another well advanced case, a man living in sur- 
roundings only a degree less wretched than those 
above described, was timid regarding the use of 
soap and water — he felt the cold keenly and bitter- 
ly bewailed the loss of any grime. Dirt, to him, 
meant a tegumentary covering for protection from 
drafts — it was clothes and warmth to him. He was 
very sick, very hungry, very poor, and oh, so dirty. 
At first he was gruff and reticent. A plant in the 
window attracted my attention — a lemon verbena, 
trailing its dust-stained foliage against the soil that 
was too ill to nurture it. I took it to the house 
sink, gave it a bath and a long, satisfying quaff of 
fresh water without attracting the sick man's atten- 
tion to my iniquity. To the lonely old man huddled 
up on a couch in the corner, I knew that neglected 
plant had meant something before he was too ill to 
care, and probably in the hopes of to-morrow he in- 
tended to attend to its needs. Each day as I came 
to his room I stopped at the sink and brought along 
some water for the poor little verbena. From its 
old cracked bowl I had transplanted it to a flower 
pot for which I had paid five cents — with its sani- 
tary care and new dress it seemed to nod a smiling 
welcome, responding at once to treatment. On the 
sixth morning I found the plant on a chair by the 
side of the patient. He was cleaner and brighter 
and seemed better, as he informed me he had been 
watching- me out of "the tail of his eye" and felt I 
was having all my trouble for nothing. He said he 
picked up the sprig of verbena out of the street, 
rooted and planted it and never forgot to care for 
it until he "just didn't care about anything." He 
said he missed it when it died and refrained from 
throwing it away because 'the mother" always had 
one in the backyard with the seringas and he 
always enjoyed the odor." He said, with dignity. 
"It always made me think of the mother and the 
mean cuss I have been." 

His story- followed — a not uncommon one. I 
learned of his mother's whereabouts, wrote to her 
of her son. Last week she arrived in Los Angeles 
and together mother and son have gone to Berke- 
ley, Cal., where they will make their home with a 
married brother who is well able to care for them. 
Before this man went away he was very careful 
about his environment and his personal hygiene. 
Fumigation of quarters occupied by him followed 
his departure. , 

These are only two instances — I could cite many 
more. Los Angeles harbors many who come west- 
ward when the ravages of the disease have left them 
no hope for recovery. The medical advice which 
induces these unfortunates to spend the last of their 
small savings in a futile journey across the cotv 
tinent in search of climate, only to die in want 
among strangers, is nothing short of criminal. A 
large number arrive with little or no means to es- 
tablish themselves properly and must at once seek 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



work to supply themselves with the necessities of 
living. Usually, after the pjttempt, many find 
themselves unable to perform any sort of labor. 
They cannot work, can only live in cheap lodgings, 
stuffy, ill-ventilated and filthy — they travel from 
one eating-place to another, ever seeking some- 
thing a little cheaper, trying to eke out a miserable 
existence on most limited capital, too ill to care 
anything about sanitary laws, even though they 
were informed on the subject, and too poor and dis- 
couraged to seek medical aid until it is too late. So 
they wend their weary, wretched, futile way ,_ trail- 
ing and spreading infection by contaminating 
dishes, napkins and cutlery, and expectorating 
whenever and wherever need presents. 

They sometimes recall that the doctor at home 
told them they must "live in the open and rough it." 
A few boards loosely grooved together, frequently 
only dry goods boxes utilized for the purpose, form 
their only shelter on some spot above the soil, 
selected not because of its suitability, but because 
someone permits them to make use of it. There 
they try to "rough it" but find themselves unequal 
to the effort. The unstable lumber between them 
and the sky is totally inadequate for proper protec- 
tion from atmospheric changes. It becomes more 
and more difficult to traverse even urgent distances 
to obtain indispensables and to wait upon them- 
selves. The disease, under such conditions, fast 
progresses, strength and courage fail, until finally 
homeless, lonely and alone, longing for the morning 
breezes, noonday heat and night warmth that were 
obtainable amongst kin and kindred "back in the 
home town," they sink as Earth's guest beyond the' 
purple West, approach to which, for them, has not 
been through the medium of golden sunshine and 
exotic climate pictured so alluringly by the doctors 
who encourage this class of unfortunates to- enter 
California portals. 

These are some of the romances played out to a 
finish below our lovely mountains, and represent 
some of the lives unwilling and unfitted to be thus 
abandoned to fate. Believe me, I have not drawn 
an occasional picture, as we who know can. testify. 
We encounter it all too often. Some reach the 
county hospital, and there experience a few hours 
of freedom from anxiety before the end comes. 

If the county hospital were used for no other pur- 
pose but to care for the indigent consumptive it 
would not supply the need. 

The Barlow Sanitorium, founded by Dr. W. Jar- 
vis Barlow, does most effective work in caring for 
the indigent tuberculous of Los Angeles county. 
The capacity of this institution is thirty, and is sup- 
ported mainly by Los Angeles philanthropy. It is 
always full with a long waiting list. Its manage- 
ment carries out a perfected plan of so distributing 
its benefits that the greatest possible number mav 
be helped through its beneficence in a yearly 
period. Some are cured, all helped, and a few die. 
Our Helping Station on Buena Vista street as- 
sists the poor tuberculosis victim in many ways. 
There he may go, be examined, that the progress 
of the disease may be noted, given medicine if need- 
ed, free of atjy charge, receive instruction as to how 
he must protect himself and others, and is helped 
morally, socially, ethically in the knowledge that he 
need not go without medical advice because he can- 



Thc L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



("Writing in Sight) 




Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue Free 

L. CgX M. Alexander CEX Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 

131 South Broadway. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones Home 1906-Main 5959 




BETWEEN 

..California the East. 

Hi ==== 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 

'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at 601 South Spring St. 




Arizona Turquoise Mines Co. 

CAN SHOW YOU THE LARGEST 
VARIETY OF COLORING IN TUR- 
QUOISE—THE ONLY STONE THAT 
IS HARD ENOUGH TO WEAR. 

Cutting' WorKs and Sales Room 

450^ SOUTH BROADWAY 

Wholesale and Retail 



BOOKSBOUGHT 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1855 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



not pay For it. and that he is being watched and 
cartel for., 

mnty hospital, Harlow Sanitarium, nor dispen- 
sary combined reach the needs. 

The cases that work, luit can afford no extra ex- 
pense, are taught how to be hygienic, to make the 
most of whatever income they have and to avoid 
unhygienic exposures, such as excesses of ever) 
kimi. over-exertion. l>» of sleep, neglect of regular 
eating, bathing, etc. Members of this class are also 
taught how to utilize their opportunities for rest, 
advised to take a glass of milk between meals in- 
stead of a glass of beer and to spend their holidays 
and recreation periods in the park. Where such a 
case has a family I enlist their interest and find 
them always eager to help in the treatment sug- 
gested. They readily fall in and help to contrive 
new conditions and appliances for the establish- 
ment of as much open-air life as possible. 

Wherever it can be done advantageously, I care- 
fully teach the patient how to conduct his treat- 
ment by himself, for my list is long and the terri- 
tory to lie covered extensive and he can do much in 
this wav to help. He may keep a record of his 
daily temperature, pulse, weekly weight, amount 
and kind of food taken, and note his cough, expec- ■ 
toration, sleep, appetite, etc. During my visit I 
quickly note any change — wdiether the physician 
ought to see him, etc. In this way, too, he can carry 
out the hygienic-dietetic treatment and follow his 
employment. For one young fellow, who was 
keeping up an alcoholic stimulant, or rather, going 
rapidly downward on alcoholic stimulant, I have 
arranged a sort of jour medical for his occupation 
and well-being. It has proved a great source of en- 
tertainment to him — from an irritable, complaining 
misanthrope be is developing into a state of mental 
quietude and cheerful expectancy as well as physi- 
cal improvement. 

(To be continued) 

* * * 

Crusade Against Hat Raising 
Count Johann Harracb, the head of the Bohemian 
aristocracy and a very wealthy glass manufacturer, 
is organizing a society for the abolition of the pres- 
ent conventional hat lifting form of salutation, 
writes a Vienna correspondent of the Pall Mall Ga- 
zette. The Count and his supporters in the new 
movement declare that this practice of baring the 
head in winter frost and snow is extremely danger- 
ous and induces neuralgia, influenza and other dis- 
agreeable ailments. 

Frugal persons afflicted with a large bowing ac- 
quaintance also complain that this form of polite- 
ness causes hats to wear out in less than half the 
ordinary time of fair wear and tear. And so to 
avoid all these evils it is proposed to substitute the 
military salute of merely raising the hand to the 
head. 

Count Harrach's proposal is not entirely original, 
the authorities in a small Bohemian town having 
also dealt with the question, in a somewhat sum- 
mary manner, it is true, by prohibiting the lifting 
of the hat under penalty of a fine, but their mandate 
met with little success. 

* * * 

"Did I understand you to say that my appear- 
ance had improved?" "No, I said you looked more 
like yourself." — Life. 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach DotH 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



sr» s^ 



KODAK 

...GO TO... 



FINISHING 



PIERCE ®> CO. 



127 W. 6th St, 



MONEY 



Diamonds Bought* and Sold 

If you have any kind of collateral that you wish to raise money 
on, call at 316 S. BROADWAY. Phone 4322 

MARKWELL & CO. 



Pacific Outlook 



MONEY AND INTEREST 



(This is the third in the series of articles dealing with economic questions of vital interest. The 
first of the series, which appeared in the Pacific Outlook June 29, dealt with profits and wages. The 
second, published July 6, was on the same subject. Future articles will discuss the inheritance and in- 
come tax, the transportation problem and street railway operation. The author is a well-known resi- 
dent of Los Angeles who has devoted a lifetime to the study of economic questions. — Editor.) 



A country can determine the kind of money it will 
use in Lhe transaction of its business, but it cannot 
determine the volume of money it will have in use 
or available for use, for the reason that an addition 
to the amount of money in circulation in any one 
country must have the effect of raising prices in 
that country, so that prices measured in money will 
be comparatively higher in the country where such 
an increase has taken place than in the countries 
with which it has commercial relations. The result 
must be that importations will increase and exports 
decrease until enough of the money has been moved 
to the other countries to equalize prices. 

It makes no difference whether the increase in the 
volume of money comes through the importation 
of the money itself or the material of which it is 
made, or whether the material of which the money 
is made is produced in the country itself. Just so 
long as the money or material from which it is 
made has an exchange value in the other countries, 
the difference in price will draw enough of the 
supply from the country having the surplus to give 
other countries their proper proportion of the whole 
amount of money being used in the world. For this 
reason the introduction of a larger volume of paper 
money in the United States would have the effect 
of transferring a part of the gold now here to other 
countries, for it would be the gold that would be 
sent out to pay for articles imported ; so that any 
action here which has the result of increasing the 
amount of paper money issued would only increase 
the supply of money in the United States in the 
same proportion as it increases the supply of money 
in the world. It would change the character of the 
money in use here, but would have very little effect 
upon the volume. 

The plan suggested for relieving what is largely 
spoken of as a money stringency in this country and 
permitting the banks to issue a paper money based 
on other securities than United States bonds or 
gold, by paying a certain sum to the government as 
interest on such notes or paper money while they 
were in circulation, could have no other effect than 
that of reducing the amount of gold in the country. 
The fact that interest was charged on the paper 
introduced or issued would not alter the result. 

The reason this plan is urged is to prevent in- 
terest rates .from being forced above the normal dur- 
ing periods when the demand for money is excessive. 

Now, heretofore such stringencies have been re- 
lieved through and because of the increased interest 
rate — partly because the increased interest rate de- 
creased the demand for money, and partly because 
the increased interest rate had the effect of drawing 
money from other countries where no money strin- 
gency existed and where the interest .rate was 
normal. 

Importations of money under these conditions' 
would continue until the stringency here had been 
relieved and interest rates had been forced down to 
approximately the same figure as that at which 



money was being loaned in the other commercial 
cr industrial countries of the world. 

Now, if money stringencies as they occur here 
were relieved by issuing notes or paper money inn 
stead of through the importation of money from 
other countries, it could have no other effect than 
that of reducing the amount of gold money in cir- 
culation or available for use here, and the propor- 
tion of gold to the whole volume of money in circu- 
lation would decrease just so long as re-occurring 
stringencies in money were relieved wholly or par- 
tially by increasing the amount of paper money in 
circulation. 

This principle is so well understood in Great 
Britain that the Bank of England arbitrarily raises 
and lowers interest rates to induce importation or 
exportation of gold as the volume of money avail- 
able for use decreases or increases. To secure our 
share of the whole amount of gold in the world, we 
must bid as high for it as other countries are will- 
ing to pay, and if the amount of gold here at any 
time falls below what is our .proper proportion of 
the whole amount of gold in the world, the only 
way in which conditions can be quickly restored 
to the normal is for us to bid a little more for gold 
than the other countries are willing to give at that 
time. The only way in which a note issue could be 
made, which would not prevent the necessary im- 
portation of gold, would be to place the interest rate 
on the notes themselves higher than the general 
rate of interest prevailing throughout the world. 

In other words, we would have to leave the condi- 
tions here so that we would still be bidding higher 
for gold than other countries were willing to pay 
for it, or the shortage existing would never be made 
good. As the interest rates are continually fluctuat- 
ing all over the world, it would certainly be a very 
difficult matter to establish interest rates on the pro- 
posed notes or paper money issued, which would be 
just high enough to insure their retirement through 
an increase in gold importations. If the interest 
rate charged on these notes or paper money were 
lower than the normal rate of interest throughout 
the world, they would never be retired, but would 
continue in circulation ; for as it would cost nothing 
to issue them, the need for money could be more 
easily supplied in that manner than in any other, 
and the increase in the volume of paper money, 
under these conditions, would be continual until the 
whole business of the country was being conducted 
with it. When this time came the gold necessary 
to settle the balance against us would have to be 
secured by paying a premium for the gold. What 
this premium would be would depend entirely on 
the volume of paper money issued, as this would 
determine the exchange value of the money; for 
just as soon as the paper money was not or could 
not be redeemed in gold, there would be no basis on . 
which its value could be established except the 
amount in circulation in proportion to the whole 
volume of business being done in the countrv. 



Pacific Outlook 



When the statement is made that the cost of 

producing an article must determine it> selling 
price, it is not meant in the sense that the average 
if production will determine the price at which 
the thing sells. The selling price will always be 
determined by the cost of producing the most COStl] 

part of the thing in question necessary to supply the 
demand for it. The difference between the price at 
which the thing sells and the average cost of pro- 
ducing it will determine the average rate of profit 
on capital engaged in its production. The profit 
on any capital invested in the production of a thing 
under normal conditions will be the difference be- 
tween what it is costing to produce the thing where 
this particular capital is engaged and the cost of 
producing the costliest part of the thing necessary 
to meet the demand for it. 

Profits, as in every business venture, are deter- 
mined in the same manner as the rentals for lands, 
the rental being always the difference between what 
the land in question and what the poorest land, 
which it is necessary to use. will produce. 

This law regulating and determining profits op- 
erates just as strongly and as positively in regard 
to the production of gold as with reference to any- 
thing else, though the profits in this industry, prob- 
ablv, vary to a greater extent than in any other, for 
the reason that the difference between the costliest 
part of the permanent production of gold in the 
world, and that part of the production which costs 
the least is greater than the difference in the cost 
of different portions of anything else in the produc- 
tion of which capital employs itself. 

As has already been pointed out, gold is contin- 
ually- growing cheaper, as indicated by advancing 
wages. If this cheapening process continue, the 
time must arrive when the lower grade gold mines 
which are now being operated at a profit will cease 
to he producers, for the reason that when wages 
have reached a point where it requires more gold 
in the form of money to pay the wages than is being 
produced, mines can no longer be operated, except 
at a loss. The result would be a suspension of op- 
erations. This decrease in the value of gold is being 
caused on account of the intensity of the demand 
for it being lessened because of the increased pro- 
duction, and the comparatively rapid increase in the 
amount of gold in existence. , 

The tendency among a large number of political 
economists seems to have been and still is to deter- 
mine the value of gold by measuring it against other 
commodities. That they must be in error becomes 
at once apparent when we consider that these com- 
modities, taken as a whole, are no more accurate 
measure for gold than they would be if taken separ- 
ately an accurate measure of the value of each other. 

Human effort is the only true measure of value 
for everything, and any particular thing is either 
increasing or decreasing in value as it requires more 
or less labor to secure it, whether that labor is 
engaged directly in producing the thing itself or 
whether it is engaged in the production of some- 
thing else which is exchanged for the thing in 
question. 

The reason why any commodity or any number 
of commodities taken together produced by labor 
cannot be used as a measure of value is because the 
amount of human effort entering into the produc- 
tion of commodities of all kinds is constantly- vary-- 



PONY RIGS 



A SPECIALTY 
WITH US 




STUDEBARER AGENCY 

WAGONS CARRIAGES IMPLEMENTS 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 



200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



PHONE HOME A 4432 

4th ST. Store 



F 7671; MAIN 4604 

SPRING ST. STORE 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST. 



Klymmffiatmea° Iir&lhi&latospiuainm 

BULLING'S METHOD OF MUNICH for the treatment of diseases of the 
airpassages-CATARRH, BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our Inhalatorium should be made b] all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send for booklet 



409 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Phone F-1467 



f 



Resumes 
Business 



IE.. 



"m Business ^ 

onradi 



Jewelry Company 



Ellegant new stoch of Diamonds, Jewelry 

and Watches 

Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C. H. Heard 

S. CONRADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles. Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews. 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



ing, and the price of anything produced by labor 
should be as compared with the price of anything 
else just in proportion to the amount of labor enr 
tering into its production as compared with the 
amount of labor entering into the production of 
anything else. 

In other words, any two commodities must ex- 
change for one another on the basis of what each 
of them has cost in labor, and because gold is used 
as the medium for effecting exchanges between 
other commodities in no way alters the fact that its 
value is determined in exactly the same manner as 
the value of other things produced by labor. 

* * * 

Church School for Sierra Madre 

In a recent letter to the clergy and laity in the 
Episcopal diocese of Southern California Bishop 
Johnson expresses the conviction that the time has 
come when schools, both for boys and girls, should 
be established in Southern California under the pa- 
tronage of the church. "There seems to be," he 
says, "a demand for educational institutions of pri- 
mary, grammar and high school grades, and I have 
already given the matter serious consideration. My 
feeling is that such schools should be the peers of 
any schools in the country for intellectual, spiritual 
and physical training, and, having that end in view, 
I have approached educators of reputation and 
ability in the East and upon this coast. An op- 
portunity is offered to us at this time in the willing- 
ness of a woman of marked culture and experience 
to undertake the establishment of a girls' school at 
Sierra Madre. That site is unparalleled. The well 
!:nown salubrity of that far-stretching bench of land 
at the foot of the hills, together with its accessibil- 
ity, fits it to be the site of such an important institu- 
tion. The lady who has the project in mind is one 
of the few women who have been trained at the 
Institute of Technology in Boston, and for the last 
year she has had entire charge of the English de- 
partment in the Marlborough school in this city. 
The distinction of training in one of the great in- 
stitutions of the land, and, of honorable affiliation 
with a school standing deservedly so high as does 
the Marlborough, is very great. We shall take 
plenty of time to effect our plans. At least a year 
will be needed to make the project known." 

* * * 

Judg'e Artman to Lecture 

Judge Samuel R. Artman of Lebanon, Ind., who 
attained national fame last winter by his famous 
decision declaring saloon licenses unconstitutional, 
will deliver a lecture on "The Unconstitutionality 
of Saloon Licenses" in Simpson auditorium Tues- 
day night, July 16. The address doubtless will call 
out a large attendance of men and women interest- 
ed in the temperance movement. It has been said 
of Judge Artman's lecture that "it is the best 
wrought out and most logical ever delivered on this 
question, from a legal standpoint." 

* * * 
Pleased 

Nell — She always said she wanted a husband who 
was easily pleased. Bess — Did she get such a one? 
Nell — Why, yes; didn't he marry her? — Lippin- 
cott's Magazine. 



"" '?*v 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at, Reduced 
Rates - . 

140 S. BROADWAY 

Main 19 Get. a City Map Free Home Ex. 19 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



INCUBATORS AND BROODERS 

Poultry Supplies, Seeds, Garden Tools, Lawn Mowers, Etc. 

Pacific Incubator Co. 
707 South Spring St,. Phones I Ma 7 ft 8 f 631 




When you read in the PACIFIC 
OUTLOOK the advertisement of 
some merchant, just remember that 
Mr. Merchant has paid well for the 
space to convince you that his 
goods are the best. 

If by persistent advertising the 
merchant is successful in gaining 
your confidence and in interesting 
you in his store and in the goods 
he sells, and if you find you want 
or need the goods he advertises 
and decide to buy, it is your duty 
to buy of him. 

The element of truth, the con- 
viction in the merchant's adver- 
tisement, must have convinced you 
that the goods he advertises are 
suited to your needs. 

BUY ADVERTISED GOODS 
BUY OF THE ADVERTISER 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



THE NEED OF TRUE MEN 



"Who Are Guided by Principle Rather than by Political Ambition 



By Cardinal Gibbons 

(The following is taken from an address recently delivered by Cardinal Gibbons, one of the great 

scholars of the day and one of the most advanced thinkers on political and economic subjects to be 

found among modern religious leaders, to the graduating class of Holy Cross College, Worcester, 

The thoughts expressed are to be commended to every young man, regardless of the church 

in which he may have been reared or the political party toward which he leans. — Kditor.) 



The question may be asked. What is the great- 
est need of our times for the betterment of society? 
Is it churches? Temples of worship are indeed 
very necessary at times. They bear evidence of the 
faith and devotion of the people. But they are not 
the most essential thing for our day. The primitive 
Christians worshipped God in the catacombs of 
Rome, and some of our forefathers adored their Lord 
in secluded mountains and in recesses and caves of 
the earth. And they, we know, were most exem- 
plary Christians. Is it hospitals and sanitariums 
that the times specially call for? Hospitals, indeed, 
are the landmarks of Christian civilization, and con- 
tribute immensely to the elevation of human misery. 
But they do not constitute the greatest need of the 
day, for they relieve only a small fraction of the 
members of the commonwealth. 

Again, what is the greatest need of the country 
and of the Church? Is it majestic and colossal state 
houses for our legislative bodies? Is it stately 
palaces for our Bishops and clergy? The conven- 
tion that met in Philadelphia in 1787 to frame the 
most momentous constitution ever framed for the 
civil guidance of man, that convention assembled in 
a hall not conspicuous for its majestic proportions. 
And external pomp does not augment the dignity 
nor the influence of our hierarchy. "You ought to 
see what a splendid episcopal house we have for 
our Bishop," remarked a clergyman to a brother 
priest, some years ago. "And you," replied the 
clergyman, "ought to see what a splendid Bishop 
we have for our episcopal house." It is not the 
dwelling that ennobles the Bishop, but it is the 
Bishop that ennobles the house. Is it schools and 
colleges that are most needed? Christian schools, 
like Worcester college, are indeed indispensable for 
the moral and mental development of the rising 
generations. But what would be the use of this 
spacious hall and the adjoining classrooms and an 
able corps of learned and pious professors, if there 
were no pupils to frequent the college? This edifice 
is the casket: you are the gems that are set in it. 
You are the jewels that are destined to adorn and 
delight fair Columbia, the mother of us all. 

I will now tell you what is the greatest need. 
What the times call for is men, sturdy men, en- 
dowed with the courage of their convictions. We 
need men who are controlled by conscience rather 
than by expediency, who are guided by principle 
rather than by popularity, who are influenced by a 
spirit of pure patriotism rather than a desire for 
political preferment. Above all, we need men of 
strong Christian faith, who are prepared to uphold 
their religious convictions in the face of popular 
prejudice. In a word, we need men of upright char- 
acter. If you reveal to me your character as above 
reproach. I will reveal to you your destiny. It is 



probable you will not be Presidents, or governors, 
or senators, or Bishops. But the attainment of 
these offices is not the test of genuine success. 
The true test of success lies in the fulfilment of 
duty. If you are faithful at the post to which Pro- 
vidence will assign you, no matter what that post 
may be, you will be successful in life ; you will 
merit the esteem of your fellow-citizens ; you will 
enjoy the testimony of a good conscience, and 
above all, you will have the approval of heaven. 
Your name may not be emblazoned on the fading 
pages of earthly history, but, what is infinitely bet- 
ter, it will be inscribed in the imperishable records 
of the Book of Life. 

But this fidelity to moral and religious principles 
in the face of obloquy and insult demands of you no 
small measure of moral heroism. Many a soldier 
who fearlessly rushed to the cannon's mouth, has 
quailed before the shafts of ridicule and the shouts 
of popular prejudice. The man who calmly fulfils 
a duty against public clamor, displays greater cour- 
age than the captain who captures cities. 

Daniel O'Connell, the great Irish tribune, accept- 
ed in his younger days a challenge from a gentle- 
man named D'Esterre, whom he killed in a duel. In 
his more mature years when sobered by religion 
and reflection, he refused to accept another chal- 
lenge. Now, O'Connell displayed greater manhood 
in declining a second duel than in engaging in the 
first one. For, in consenting to fight, he yielded to 
a depraved public opinion against the voice of con- 
science, while. in refusing the second challenge, he 
obeyed the dictates of conscience in defiance of 
popular clamor which branded him as a coward. 

If Plato gloried in claiming Greece as the place 
of his birth, how much more should you rejoice in 
being born and nurtured in a country so free and 
enlightened as the Lhiited States of America! Here, 
thank God, there is liberty without license, and au- 
thority without despotism. Here the government 
holds over you the aegis of its protection, without 
interfering with the God-given and inalienable- 
rights of private conscience. 

No citizen of the United States should be a drone 
in the social hive. No man should be an indifferent 
spectator of the social, economic and political prob- 
lems which are presented to his consideration. And 
if every citizen should take an interest in public af- 
fairs, surely those who enjoy the advantages of a 
liberal education should in a special manner have a 
deep concern for their country's moral and material 
welfare. Exercise the right of suffrage by giving 
your influence only to candidates of clean hands 
and unsullied reputation. But you will best serve 
your country by the integrity of your private lives. 
Political life is the reflex of domestic life. For the 
stream does not rise above its source. 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



under the: SKYLIGHTS 



End of Exhibition 

The eighth annual spring exhibition by Southern 
California artists will close next week with a recep- 
tion Wednesday evening. The forty exhibitors will 
be guests of honor and Mrs. Randolph Miner will 
head the receiving party which will be composed of 
leading society women. 

Since the opening of the Blanchard Gallery for 
this praiseworthy exhibition about 2,000 visitors 
have studied the pictures in oil, pastel and water 
color. This fact proves that F. W. Blanchard's 
praiseworthy effort to arouse a midsummer interest 
in the work of Southern California artists has been 
appreciated. Recognition is due to Everett Max- 
well, also, for his success in the actual labor of ar- 
ranging the pictures. He rendered most efficient 
aid to Mr. Blanchard and his taste and tact have 
been revealed in a hundred ways. 

Among the pictures Helen E. Coan's three beau- 



sphere, quiet, repose and the silence of the time 
when the shadows are resting upon trees and earth. 
The blue sky has the luminous depth that an- 
nounces the hastening of the hour of darkness. 
Miss Coan's "Spring" is in strong contrast to the 
moods of nature represented in "Over the Hill" and 
"Evening." This picture is painted with delicacy 
and yet with strength. It is a little song of awak- 
ening nature. Miss Coan possesses in an unusual 
degree the gift of knowing how to convey sugges- 
tions of beauty; she realizes how much can be told 
by a certain amount of repression. 

Another woman painter has three noteworthy 
pictures. Nanette Calder, Mrs. Alexander Stirling 
Calder, is best represented by "Walking Elk," a 
study of an Indian's head. This is broadly painted 
and shows the distinct individuality of the red man. 
"Little Lucy" is a picture in which the child is 
subordinated to the landscape, a clever harmony in 
colors. "A Little Interior" has more than ordinary 
interest, although it is not an ambitious picture. 




"Over the Hill", 
tiful landscapes have attracted much attention. 
"Over the Hill" is a charming study in low tones. 
A road climbs abruptly and at the summit of a hill 
beyond which a distant mountain is seen a group 
of wind blown trees casts shadows upon the earth. 
The composition is strong and the treatment is 
simple. The handling of the light, the harmony of 
line and the quality of the color tones make this 
picture a little gem. The artist has put into the 
landscape the touch of poetry which makes it a true 
interpretation of nature. "Evening," the largest 
of the canvases in Miss Coan's three pictures, has 
in it the feeling of the coming night. Here again 
the painter has used directness as her keynote. 
The composition proves how well she knows how 
to preserve all the harmonies. Here are atmo- 



by Helen E. Coan 

J. Bond Francisco is seen at his best in his 
"Cherry Canyon," "Along the. Foothills" and 
"Wood Interior." "Along the Foothills" is a typi- 
cal California. study to which the artist has brought 
the careful technique and the sympathetic feeling 
that distinguish his work. He is fortunate in his 
choice of subjects and his manner of presenting 
them. 

Miss Lida S. Price, who came to Los Angeles a 
few months ago, is introduced to a larger public 
than that which she reached in her recent exhibition 
by means of her "Young Girl in White," a picture 
that was hung in the Paris salon, and a study of the 
head of an Italian boy. Miss Price is a draughts- 
man whose strength is felt in every line and she has 
a fine sense of color. Both these pictures have 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



been mentioned previously in the Pacific Otitli 
but they are so good that they command special 
consideration. 

Among the water colors is "The Porte of Saint 
Marks," a beautiful piece of drawing and color by 
Marion Holder! Pope. Mrs. Pope is famous in 
Southern California on account of her etchings, 
two <->i which are exhibited in this collection, but 
she has gained unusual recognition elsewhere by 
her paintings in oil and water color. This Venetian 
picture reveals her versatility. It has the quality 
of charm that distinguishes all her work. "The Big 
Tree" ami "The Villa d'Este" are etchings into 
which Mrs. Pope has infused the feeling of color. 
With her needle she has probed the heart of nature 
and sha has caught .something more than the mere 
outlines of the villa. 

Norman St. Clair's work stands out among; the 
water colors. I lis "Hilltops" and "Early Morning 
in the- Arroyo Seco" are done with a freedom, that 
is delightful. 

Mary Harland's exhibition of miniatures has been 
enjoyed by many visitors wdio paused to examine 
the exquisite portrait heads done by an artist who 
has been accorded distinction abroad. Miss Har- 
land paints miniatures in a way that leaves little 
to be desired. The faces that look out from the 
oval frames have in them the souls of men and 
women. 



Joseph Greenbaum has been making a series of 
thumb box sketches that will be coveted by all who 
appreciate glimpses of nature caught in a half 
hour among the hills or on the sea shore. For the 
enlightenment of those who do not know what a 
thumb box it, it may be said that it combines 
palette, paintbox and everything else needed for 
sketching within the compass of a few inches. Per- 
sons wdio are familiar with Mr. Greenbaum's work 
will be quick to appreciate these little pictures 
which have the spontaneity and freshness that make 
them much to be desired. Next to the possession 
of a large picture by this artist a thumb box sketch 
is something to-be coveted. Mr. Greenbaum is now 
finishing a large portrait of Mrs. Hancock Banning 
which will add much to his reputation. The pose 
is little less than an inspiration and the portrait has 
a value quite independent of its relation to likeness 
to Mrs. Banning. It is a beautiful picture that 
makes instant appeal to the person who appreciates 
what is good in art. 

Solon Borglum passed a few days in Los An- 
geles this week, but his visit was so brief that few 
of the artists had an opportunity to meet him. Mr. 
Borglum was a pupil of Rebisso and Freniet in 
Paris and after his return to the United States made 
a study of western life with which he had been 
more or less familiar when a boy. He first attained 
recognition in 1899 when he won an honorable men- 
tion in the Paris salon. He won silver medals a\ 
the Paris exposition of 1900 and at the Buffalo ex- 
position a year later. His work at the St. Louis ex- 
position caused him to be one of the most exploited 
sculptors in the United States and for it he received 
a gold medal. Mr. Borglum is not yet forty and has 
reached a position that insures more than tempor- 
ary fame and fleeting financial success. He has a 
studio in New York, where he is closelv associated 
with his brother Gutzon Borglum. 




Sing Fat Co., 



Inc. 



Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-10 South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 1121 POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 




Los Angeles 

Ostrich. Farm 

Opposite 

EAST LAKE PARK 

Most Beautiful Feather Display 
Ever Made in Los Angeles- 5c 
Car Fare on City or Pacific Elec- 
tric Cars. 

5 Acres of Gigantic 
=rBirds 




tU (gtubtforinm QBa$ ant £otfef (patfont 

— mhh_ ^ — ^^— l : i ' Ladies and Gentlemen ^^^^^^^^^^^^™«« 
900 AUDITORIUM BUILING 

fifth AND OLIVE ST5. 



Telephone Home F 5024 



MRS. L. PENNR1CH 



22 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




Will Be a Great Singer 

Miss Mary Gladys Richey is one of the most 
promising of the throng of young girls' who have 
come home to Los Angeles from eastern schools 
to pass the summer months. For two years Miss 
Richey has been studying in the New England Con- 
servatory of Music as a private pupil of Charles A. 
White, head of the vocal department. She has a 
remarkable contralto voice of rare quality, great 
resonance and big compass. Although still very 
young she has won distinction in the famous 
school. She has had the honor of being chosen as 







ffl '"' 






uV*'* ' 






j£* 




'. 






















* ^ 


. 


■ ' 


■r 


f Jt„ vt&jhBS 


fe 


o 






V 










* 



Miss Mary Gladys Richey 

soloist for the Chromatic Club of Boston and has 
appeared several times before the Vincent Club, 
one of the leading musical organizations of the 
Massachusetts metropolis. For the last year she 
has devoted her attention to oratorio work. • A bril- 
liant future has been predicted for the Southern 
California girl. Before going East to study Miss 
Richey was a pupil of Charles Farwell Edson, who 
has discovered many good voices and started a 
number of singers on the road to success. Miss 
Richey, who is at home with her mother, Mrs. Z. 
H. Jarman, is being much entertained. She is a 
native daughter and has always been a favorite in 
a wide circle of friends. In appearance she is most 



striking. She is tall and handsome — a blonde with 
beautiful coloring. Several years must pass before 
she is twenty, but she has the poise and dignity of a 
woman. She is a hard student and with her extraor- 
dinary talents she has the power to achieve much 
as a singer. 



Women Writers Entertained 

Mr. and Mrs. Otho F. Coe entertained the mem- 
bers of the Southern California Woman's Press 
Club last Sunday afternoon at their picturesque 
bungalow on Glen Albyne drive. The big porch, 
which overlooks miles of valley, was decorated with 
flowers and greenery and here the newspaper 
writers gathered for an informal programme. The 
guests of honor, Mrs. Coe's sisters, Miss Minnie E. 
Oliphant and Mrs. Morris B. Jackson, Jr., widely 
known as singers, contributed several numbers. One 
of their duets, a song written by Mrs. Coe, was a 
noteworthy feature of the programme. Mrs. Jack- 
son, who has been living in Seattle since her mar- 
riage a year ago, will visit Los Angeles for a fort- 
night before returning North. With Miss Oliphant 
she still appears now and then on the concert plat- 
form and it is hoped that the Oliphant sisters may 
be heard again before they leave Southern Cali- 
fornia. 



Society Minstrels 

One hundred and fifty women made a success 
of one of the cleverest minstrel performances ever 
seen in Southern California last Monday evening at 
Venice. The auditorium was crowded and the 
heartiest appreciation was manifested when the 
really new jokes were offered. Mrs. Claudia Hazen 
White was stage manager and Dante Forcelotti, as- 
sisted by William Fitchett, directed the music. 
Miss Marguerite Bates and Miss Mary Tenney 
did a cake walk that won several recalls. In the 
cast were : Interlocutor, Marguerite Doaine ; end- 
men, Mrs. Abbot Kinney, Mrs. George Sibley 
J. Slauson, Selma Francisco, Susie Ponder, 
Wickiser, Mildred Taylor, Anna Webster, 
Holdzkerm, Mrs. Jennie Hathaway Spencer, 
B. Brown, Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Mrs. McLain, Miss 
Bryson. Specialties, Gladys Richey, Selma Fran- 
cisco, Clementine Ashley, Blanche Wilson, Mrs. R. 
A. Phillips, Frances Rogers, Jennie Hathaway 
Spencer, Marguerite Doaine, Olive Thomas, Mar- 
guerite Bates, Mary Tenney, Bessie Fuhrer, Claudie 
Hazen White, Marguerite Currin, Venita Rush, 
Marie Sibley, Vera C. Cole, Geraldine Seiser, Mrs. 
Nell Lockwood McCune, Nettie Bouck, Mabel 
Yager, Ethel Cooper, Leona Thomas. 



Ella 
Jean 
Bess 
Mrs. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Banning and Mrs. Ban- 
ning's sister, Mrs. Mary Norris of New York, are 
at the Banning summer home in Descanso Canyon, 
Catalina Island. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. Heney returned to San 
Francisco Sunday after a brief visit in which it was 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



quite impossible for them t" accept more than one 
• ir two of the many invitations that came u> them. 
Mrs. Homy i- the daughter of former United States 
Senator John McMullan. From her mother, a Ken- 
tucky beauty, she has inherited unusual charm of 
face and form. She is a blonde of slender figure. 
She speaks with the low, soft voice of the Southern 
woman and lias a personality of ureal attractive- 
ness. While in Los Angeles she renewed her ac- 
quaintance with her old schoolmates, Mrs. Walter 
Newhall and Mrs. Otero W. Childs. 

The Friday Morning club kept open house for the 
X. E. A. visitors Thursday afternoon from twelve 
until two o'clock. The rooms were made fragrant 
with flowers ami pretty -iris presided at the punch 
bowls. Mrs. Shelley Tolhurst, the recently elected 
president, assisted by the officers and members of 
the hoard of directors of the club, received several 
hundred visitors, among whom were a number of 
women educators of national distinction. While 
the reception was most informal it was one of. the 
most enjoyable social events of the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Lummis gave a Spanish 
dinner Sunday evening in honor of Francis E. 
Leupp, the Indian commissioner, and Nathan C. 
Schaeffer, president of the N. E. A. The guests in- 
cluded: Miss Estelle Reel, superintendent of In- 
dian Schools, Gen. Charles W. Barrows, Prof. Sam- 
uel T. Black and Miss Black, Prof, and Mrs. W. H. 
Housh, J. O. Koepfli. J. A. Foshay, Isidore B. 
Dockweiler, Miss Manuela Garcia, Mr. and Mrs. Y. 
A. Garcia, Wayland Smith and Miss Virginia 
Grose. 

The reception of the Ebell Club given Thursday 
afternoon in honor of members of the N. E. A. was 
one of the memorable entertainments of a season 
in which the club has had many star events. The 
beautiful rooms were artistically decorated with 
flowers and greenery and many beautiful gowns 
were displayed. Mrs. Philip G. Hubert, president 
of the club, was assisted in receiving by the various 
officers and directors and by Mrs. Robert J. Bur- 
dette, Mrs. Josiah Evans Cowles, and Mrs. Oliver 
C. Bryant. 

One of the pleasant house parties of the week 
was enjoyed by members of the Phi Delta Chi sor- 
ority who went to Playa del Rey under the chaper- 
onage of Miss Lillian Van Dyke. A dinner dance 
Tuesday evening attracted guests from Los An- 
geles. The members of the house party were: 
Misses Fanny Rowan. Harriett Severance. Gwen- 
dolen Laughlin, Edith Maurice, Flossie Rowan, Ju- 
lia Derby and Kitty Wall nidge. 

The reception that celebrated the opening of the 
new Country Club house at Glendale was enjoyed 
by many prominent persons July 4, and since the 
beautiful mission building has been occupied it has 
been much patronized by members and guests from 
Los Angeles. The club house, which is not far 
from the Casa Verdugo, is one of the most pic- 
turesque places in the San Fernando valley. L. C. 
Brand is president and G. T. Holman vice-president. 

Mrs. Minor Morris, sister of Congressman John 
Albert T. Hull, chairman of the house committee 
on military affairs, is visiting her brother, F. Wilbur 
Hull, No. 956 East Fifty-fifth street. Mrs. Morris 



3 "-»-' s Wei}} !,ii - :, « 

Srt.Hn.. mm, vv B0.IT1M. R*n» 



80. iin.i. 6 



A. FUSK.VOT CO. 



"THe Store Beautiful" 

Our Great 

Fre°Eiraveimtospy Sale 

Is creating many remarkable bargains this Week, 
as the slogan of this stirring sale is 

t§nk©2°fteira Prices ft© iSlhoirteim 
Sfcocl&s JBeffoire SEawoiciiag. 



Tile reason our sale has met with such an enthus- 
iastic patronage in the face of so many other sales is 

"Ville" Reductions are Genuine. 

Great savings will be in the reach of all who are for- 
tunate enough to attend this sale next Monday, 
July IS. 

Read and Heed These Prices 

5000 yds. Plain and Fancy Silks 
Regularly sold from $1 to $2 per yard, Mon- 
day at the remarkably low price of 75c yd. 

In checks, plaids, stripes and Foulards 20 to 27 
inches wide. In Taffetas, Peau de Cygne, 
and Louisene. 

$10 and $12 Trimmed Hats at $5 
In flower trimmed straw hats and many beautiful 

Lingerie Hats. 
Live bargains will greet you Monday in every sec- 
tion of the big store. 



PARLOR MILLINERY. 



dills 



Miss L,illie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F 3175 



An Evening With 
Browning 




Readings 
from 

Popular 
Books 



MISS GILBERT will furnish evening entertainments for- 
select gatherings during July and August. Address 



421 W. Adams St,. 



Phone B 3126 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



is the wife of Dr. Minor Morris, formerly connected 
with the Army Medical Museum, and eighteen 
months ago gained much notoriety by the fact that 
she was forcibly ejected from the White House 
when she called for an interview with President 
Roosevelt. The unfortunate incident, which was 
due to the officiousness of an under secretary, 
caused Mrs. Morris much nervous strain and she is 
enjoying a restful month in Southern California. 

Mrs. Jirah D. Cole, president of the Dominant 
Club, gave a reception to members last Saturday 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. W. O. Cole, No. 1115 
Magnolia avenue. Mrs. C. G. Stivers, .Miss Kath- 
erine Elbert and Miss Estelle Catherine Heartt 
assisted the hostess. A fine programme of music 
was presented by Miss Lillian Smith, the gifted 
young pianist, and Miss Frieda Koss, the well 
known singer. 

Mrs. William Horace Day, No. 946 South Union 
avenue, gave an informal reception Saturday after- 
noon in honor of Mrs. Warren F. Day, who re- 
turned recently from a trip to Honolulu. The fol- 
lowing assisted the hostess in receiving her guests : 
Mesdames E. P. Clark, E. P. Bosbyshell, Hugh 
Harris.on, Harriet A. Burd, M. S. Averill, Mary Por- 
ter Haines and Miss Emily Peck. 

Major and Mrs. Robert C. Rankin of Las Vegas, 
New Mexico, are visiting at the home of Mrs. Ran- 
kin's mother, Mrs. Adelaide Comstock, No. 768 
Hartford avenue. Mrs. Rankin is a sister of Walter 
H. Comstock, secretary of the Sait Lake railroad. 
Major Rankin is a banker of Las Vegas and one of 
the most prominent among the younger generation 
of men in New Mexico. 

Miss Clementine Griffin, daughter of Mrs. E. P. 
Griffin of El Castillo, Verdugo, has returned from 
Vassar to pass her vacation at her picturesque 
home. Miss Griffin is a junior and in her two years 
at the famous college has made star records in 
the class room and on the athletic field. 

The engagement of Miss Mazie Langhorne and 
Richard Hammond of San Francisco is announced. 
Mr. Hammond is a brother of Miss Edwina Ham- 
mond, who has become well known in Los An- 
geles as the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. 
Connell. 

Miss Mildred Neiswender, whose marriage to 
Ralph Edinger will be one of the social events of 
the summer, was entertained Tuesday afternoon 
by Miss Barrington and was guest of honor at a 
luncheon given by Mrs. Frank Harbert. 

Mr. and Mrs. Glover Widney, No. 1902 Hobart 
boulevard, gave a dinner Tuesday evening. Covers 
were laid for Mr. and Mrs. Chester Montgomery, 
Mr. and Mrs. Warren Carhart and Mr. and Mrs. 
Durward DeVan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Silent, accompanied by 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thomas and their daughter, 
Miss Anita Thomas, are making an automobile trip 
through the northern part of the state. 

Miss Josephine Dillon. No. 684 Benton boule- 
vard, entertained the members of the Stanford 
Women's Club Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson gave a box party last 
Saturday afternoon for her daughter, Miss Kath- 
erine Edson. The guests of honor were Miss Gladvs 





m 




■ 
' 



Summer Prices 



IN 



Table 
Silverware 



We need the room for our fall stock and offer both 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 



"We are Practical Watchmahers 



-Don't Buy Until "You See Us 



BRIGDEN m PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 




Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER.... 





IKIBU 



Toilet 
Parlors 



The most sanitary and the most up-to-date hair 
dressing parlors — with the largest and most complete 
stock of hair goods in the city. 

All her preparations are guaranteed under the pure food and druglaws. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Manicuring 
HEADQUARTERS 

Central Department Store 

609-619 South Broadway 
On Balcony Adjoining Ladies' Rest Room 



Pacific Outlook 



25 



Ritchey, Mi~- Rose Lippincott and Miss Kathleen 
Carter. After the matinee performance of "The 
Serenade" by the Californians, refreshments wore 
served at the Alexandria grill, where a large round 
table was decorated with sweet peas anil ferns. 
Twelve young yirls were entertained. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Letts, accompanied by their 
daughter, Miss Via Letts, are making a tour of the 
Vosemite. They will pass a fortnight or more at 
Lake Taho( before returning to their home in 
Hollywi " 

Miss Florence Silent. No, 4 Chester place, is 
among the hostesses of the week. Miss Silent ar- 
ranged a dance in honor of her brother, Chester 
Silent, who was graduated from Stanford with the 
class of '07. 

Mr. and Mrs. George S. Patton of San Gabriel, 
with their son and daughter, Mr. George Patton, Jr.. 
and Miss Ann Patton. have gone to Catalina for 
the summer. 

Miss Ethel Shrader and Miss Mary Widney gave 
.' reception in honor of Miss Laing Wednesday 
afternoon at Miss Shrader's Hollywood home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Newton gave a box 
party Monday evening at the Mason Opera house 
in honor of Miss Pearl Seeley. 

Miss Lucy Clark of St. James park is enjoying a 
trip through Oregon and Washington with her 
father, E. P. Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. T. P.radford and Miss Minnie 
Bryan of No. 141 Westmoreland Place are at Lake 
Tahoe for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Carhart are now in their 
new home, Xo. 982 Vermont avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Clark, Jr., passed a few days 
at the Hotel Van Xuys this week. 

Former Mayor and Mrs. M. P. Snyder are pass- 
ing the summer in Ocean Park. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Bert Ellis have returned from 
their wedding journey. 

Mrs. H. M. Russell and Miss Eva Keating are at 
Atlantic City. 

Miss Susie Carpenter is visiting in San Francisco. 

Airs. Alary Banning has gone to Alaska. 

* * * 

StucK to His Price . 

One of the real estate dealers of Los Angeles 
showed the effects of the dull season, with its un- 
usually warm weather, last week when a possible 
purchaser interviewed him. 

"What's the price of Lot 6 in your new subdivis- 
ion on Prosperity Heights?" was the query as the 
possible purchaser studied one of the real estate 
man's optimistic maps. 

"The price is $4,000," was the answer. 

The questioner went on studying the map with- 
out making any comment. 

"The price is $4,000," repeated the real estate 
man," but just to be doing something I'll sell for 
$800." 

And the deal was duly chronicled in the Sunday 
editions of all the Los Angeles newspapers. 



"2f/?e Brass Bowl" 

By I "in- Joseph Vance. Pictures by Orson Lowell, 
Price $1.35, 

"Among the fiction \ ks for the coming sum 

mer's reading 'The Brass Bowl' by Louis Joseph 
Vance should hold a high place. 

"It is one of thr best pieces 'if rattling romance 
that lias been put out in many a day." 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 
The Big Book Store 252 S. Spring St,. 

"The Store With the Money Back Policy." 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
SWINGS _ BANK 




Money is the marvelous in- 
strument to which we are 
indebted for our wealth and 
civilization. 

Ready money drives thie 
wedge into success. 
A savings account is the safest 
way to accumulate "ready 
money." 

Join the 20,000 depositors 
who are building wealth with 
our assistance. 

Four per cent paid on De- 
posits. 
GERMAN AMERICAN 
SAVINGS BANK 
223 SOUTH SPRING STREET 

BRANCH, MAIN AND FIRST STS, 




MCDONALD'S HAIRDROTG COLLEGE 




SUITE 38 AND 40 - JK<1» ^ LOiS ANGELES 
MERCANTILE PLACE "f CALIFORNIA 

NEAR JPRJNG ST. " HOME ntONE F 8327 

The College is equipped with all the modern facilities known- 
to the profession — every device that will aid the student in 
mastering the work in a professional manner. <J Patrons 
received at reduced prices treated by senior students un- 
der the personal supervision of experienced attendants. 



Pacific Outlook 



DarK-colored Cigars the Best 

The campaign of education inaugurated by To- 
bacco, one of the leading tobacco trade journals, 
to dissipate the senseless prejudice entertained by 
the great mass of smokers that dark-colored cigars 
were necessarily strong, and that light-colored cigars 
were milder and sweeter, has borne splendid fruit. 
It was a campaign founded on reason, declares this 
publication, and it set in motion forces for the real 
enlightenment of the smoker. 

The color of the outer wrapper has practically 
nothing to do with its strength or mildness. Con- 
trary to the belief so long entertained by a multi- 
tude of smokers, the color of the wrapper does not 
afford the slightest indication as to the color of the 
filler tobacco inside the cigar. The cigar makers 
receive a certain number of wrappers and a certain 
quantity of filler tobacco, which are made into 
cigars without the slightest thought as to combin- 
ing light filler with ligh,t wrapper or dark filler with 
dark wrapper. 

When the cigars have been finished and it is im- 
possible to determine which contain the dark and 
which the light or medium colored filler, they are 
assorted according to the shade of the wrappers, 
merely that they may present a uniform appearance 
in the box. It may be, and often is the case that 
the darkest filler is beneath the lightest wrapper, 
and the lightest filler beneath the darkest wrapper. 

Furthermore, the light-colored tobacco in the 
best cigar leaf is light because it is plucked when 
imperfectly ripened, and is not fully cured in the 
subsequent process of sweating fermentation. As 
a result, the lieht-colored cigar leaf is lacking in 
the high quality and aroma of the natural, fully 
ripened and cured dark tobacco. In a majority of 
cases the light-colored leaf is acrid and bitter to 
the taste. 

Dark cigars are almost invariably sweeter, finer 
flavored, more aromatic and more wholesome than 
the pale, bilious-colored cigars, so that the man who 
selects a dark cigar gets the best value for his 
money. 

* * * 
American Tourists' Expenditures 

During the season of 1906, from May 1 to No- 
vember 1, 186,227 tourists and visitors were regis- 
tered in the hotels and pensions in the city of 
Lucerne, Switzerland. Of this number 18,346 were 
from the United States. This does not take into 
account the great number of travelers who visit and 
spend much time each year in the numerous attrac- 
tive villages, lake and mountain resorts in the vi- 
cinity of Lucerne. 

The railway statistics show that the tourists to 
Lucerne last season spent $6,439,540 for local rail- 
way fares. The average number of visitors per day 
for six months is estimated at 5,000. It is estimated 
that they spend while there, on an average, five 
dollars per day each, making a daily expenditure 
for hotels, carriages, incidentals, etc., $25,000 a day, 
which for the six months amounts to $4,655,675. 
Add to this the amount spent for railway fares in 
Lucerne, $6,439,540, and we have a total of $11,095,- 
215. The population of Lucerne is 32,000, which 
makes the amount of money spent by tourists in 
that city equal to $457-35 United States currency 
per year for each man, woman, and child living in 



Lucerne. A fraction over ten per cent of the total 
amounts thus spent by tourists was by Americans, 
making $1,110,000 American money spent by pleas- 
ure and health seekers in Lucerne alone last season. 
When the fact is taken in consideration that these 
figures represent the money spent by tourists in 
Lucerne alone for one season, that that is only one 
of the many attractive cities in the country, and 
that there are a large number of popular winter re- 
sorts in Switzerland, where thousands of tourists 
spend the winter in expensive hotels, the import- 




HERE 



You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yourself. 



o is. ii o 

Tlhe GeE&ttlesH&eH& 9 s Taalor 
SS4 WEST THIRD STREET 



Thelorg'esl and finest stocK of furniture in the West 

OUR METHODS OF DELIVERY 

will surely meet with your approval for we have established a system 
whereby we can deliver our goods as desired by our customers, and 
always in perfect condition. If you are furnishing a home or if you are 
buying only a single piece you should see our stock. Everything new. 
We pay the freight to any point within 100 miles of Loa Angeles. 



'Furniture <£©. 

640-646 SOUTH MILL ST. T 



Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — npt a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 



Pacific Outlook 



'., 



ance of this class of business and the vast sum of 
money being poured into Switzerland annually 
through this source may be appreciated. 

* * * 
TillamooK Head 

i >ne of the most spectacular lighthouse achieve- 
ments on either American coast is the light on 
Tillamook Rock, a short distance above Tillamook 
bay, Oregon. This apparently impossible feat was 
accomplished under tremendous difficulties. 

Tillamook Rock is a small, abrupt rock formation 
one mile from the mainland. The sides are so pre- 
cipitous and so inhospitable that even in calm 
weather the landing is exceedingly dangerous, so 
that on the first attempt to put a working party 
on the rock the foreman lost his life. 

The party did not land and it was difficult there- 
after to get the skilled labor necessary; but at last 
in 1 871) nine men succeeded in landing with pro- 
visions and tools. Building themselves a strong 
shelter, bolted to the rock, they set to work. Blast- 
ing had to be done to get the foundation, supplies 
and stone and tools and apparatus had to be landed 
from ships, involving much difficult engineering 
and many hairbreadth escapes, but after eighteen 
months of labor the structure was completed. 

In stormy weather Tillamook Rock and the sur- 
rounding waters form one of the most awe-inspir- 
ing sights on the Pacific coast. There have been 
numerous occasions when the waves have dashed 
far above the top of the lighthouse, and on at least 
one occasion, several years ago, a great boulder, 
weighing several hundred pounds, was lifted by the 
onrushing waters and dashed against the structure, 
almost demolishing it. 

* * * 



The S. P. 



M« 



The Southern Pacific Railroad Company has se- 
cured from the Mexican Government a subvention 
of $750,000 gold, and the company has deposited 
$120,000 gold for the fulfillment of its part of the 
contract to build the Cananea, Yaqui River and Pa- 
cific Railroad, in the states of Sinaloa and Sonora, 
which when completed will be 1,000 miles in length. 
Two sections of the road 200 miles in length are 
finished and are open for traffic from Empama, 
Sonora, south to Corral. From Corral the road will 
run to Valdervain and Buena Vista, and thence to 
Culiacan, the capital of Sinaloa. The third section 
extends from Mazatlan to Tepic, and the fourth sec- 
tion from Tepic to Guadalajara, the southern ter- 
minus. The rails for the road were bought in Spain, 
and most of the ties and sleepers in Japan. The 
contract for grading the entire length was awarded 
to a well-known firm of Los Angeles. 

* * * 

MaKing Him Feel Easy- 
Sam Warren, the author of ''Ten Thousand a 
Year," has been the subject of many anecdotes, 
none of them better than one which I first heard 
related about him by his friend Matthew Daven- 
port Hill. 

Looking in one day at Warren's chambers. Hill 
noticed that he seemed a little troubled. "It is." 
said the lawver-novelist. "most unfortunate. I 



ought 10 have dined tonight with the Lord Chan- 
cellor, lint Mrs. Warren is aboul to presenl me with 
another olive branch: how can 1 leave her? I hope 

his lordship won't he annoyed at my putting him 
oil.'' "Oh," returned Hill, "don't make yourself 
uneasy; I am one of the guests : I len iw him so well 
I can put it all right for you." With these words 
the visitor prepared to leave the room. 

At first profusely grateful. Warren presently 
seemed a little perplexed, and said: ."By the bye 
after all. T won't trouble you to say anything about 
me to the Chancellor. Between ourselves, I have 
not been invited." 

"Well," rejoined Hill, "make yourself comfort- 
able on that point; for that matter, neither have I." 
—Pall Mall Gazette. 

* * * 

The Greatest Commandment 

Thou shalt worship the Almighty Dollar with all 
thy heart, with all thy soul and with all thy might. 
This is the first and great commandment; and the 
second is like unto it: Thou shalt love thy neighbor 
less than his money. On these two commandments 
hang all the "law" and its profits. — Tidings (Los 
Angeles). 



ARTS AND 

MRS. 
Hand Painted China 
Hammered Metals 
Burnt and Modeled Leather 


CRAFTS SHOP 

C. D. WESTON 

Home Phone E 3345 

347 S- Broadway 




WHAT 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

OFFERS 

A thorough training in the science of a great pro- 
fession. 

A useful professional career and an opportunity 
to benefit suffering humanity. 

POSITION— INFLUENCE— WE ALT II 

Prepare to enter our fall term. Send for free 
booklet to J. W. Cook, Secretary, Daly St. and 

Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



28 



Pacific Outlook 




Notes From the Theaters 

"Peter Pan" captivated Los Angeles this 'week. 
Maude Adams long ago won the hearts of Ameri- 
can playgoers, but in this latest vehicle for her art 
she made a new appeal that will be remembered 
among the few dramatic events which belong to the 
realm of pure poetry. Nothing more exquisite than 
this impersonation can be imagined. "Peter Pan" 
can hardly be called a drama — it is a dream in 
which all who behold the play dwell again in the 
magic world of half-forgotten childhood. Despite 
the warm weather the Mason opera house has been 
well filled each night and it may be said that this 
last event of the season is in many ways the best. 

"Friend Fritz" with Hobart Bosworth in the 
title role proved to be an acceptable offering this 
week at the Belasco. The play has charm and 
novelty. It is well put on and beautifully acted. 

Hall Caine's "The Prodigal Son" is a poor play 
hut the company at the Burbank has made the best 
of it this week. Harry Mestayer as Oscar does a 
piece of work which causes his friends to remind 
every one that they have always known he will be 
great by and by. 

Julia Heinrich, the talented daughter of Max 
Heinrich, was welcomed at the Orpheum this week 
by man}' of her friends. With Miss Margaret 
Easter Miss Heinrich presents a musical act far 
above the ordinary standard. Her contralto voice 
has lost nothing of its sweetness in the exacting and 
•constant work which' has been necessary in meet- 
ing the demand of vaudeville. 

Miss Marie Dunkle is playing the leading woman 
at the Grand opera house while Miss Florence 
Barker enjoys a well earned vacation. Miss Dunkle 
was much applauded in a wild melodrama, "10,000 
Reward." 

T. Daniel Frawley will begin a four weeks' star- 
ring engagement at the Burbank theater. beginning- 
July 21. He will open in "The Climbers." 

Miss Maude Adams will appear next week in the 
following plays: Monday and Tuesday evenings 
and Wednesday matinee, "L'Aiglon" ; Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday evenings, "Quality Street" ; 
and Saturday matinee, "Peter Pan." 

Miss Constance Skinner, who has introduced a 
half-breed Indian in her play, "The Birthright," 
which John H. Blackwood is to put on at the Belas- 
co, is one of the stanchest supporters of Antonio 
Apache. In the recent controversy concerning Mr. 
Apache's ancestry and racial characteristics, Miss 
Skinner announced her faith in the Indian origin 
of the clever, dark-skinned man who has made the 
most of the advertising possibilities in the mystery 
concerning his hair. Tf Mr. Apache does wear a 



toupee, it must be a good one and his wig maker 
ought to make a fortune. If he follows Miss 
Skinner's advice he will apply for a chance to create 
the half-breed's role in her drama and the Belasco 
press agent will call his wig thrice blessed. 

Mrs. Tully Marshall, known on the stage as Mar- 
ion Fairfax, is visiting in Ocean Park. Mrs. Mar- 
shall is the author of "The Builders," one of the . 
most successful of the new plays, and will devote 
herself to writing dramas. 

Leonardo Campanari, the famous violinist, has 
come to Los Angeles for his vacation. He may de- 
cide to remain in Southern California and if he does 
he will be a brilliant recruit for the big army of 
Southern California musicians. 

* * * 
Easily Counted 

Rambling Waggles — I was robbed last night, and 
I reckon that about fifty-three articles were stolen 
from me. Everything I had in the world. Police- 
man — Fifty-three articles? Rambling Waggles — 
Yes ; a pack of cards and a corkscrew. — Tit-Bits. 




A PROPOSITION 



®lff 



late 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St.. 




Office Phone; Ji lOSI 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 



Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

355 South Hill Street 



Residence Phone: E 2727 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



Prominent Personages 

tin- very Few priests who can claim the 
•ict i> mi of being a lawyer is the Rev. Farrell 
Martin. 1). !>.. rector of St. Cecilia's Church, \\ 
luiry. Conn. A short time ago he graduated from 
the New York Law Schi 

The Abbe Felix Klein, of Pari-, is crossing the 
water for liis second visit to the United States. 
His "Land of the Strenuous Life." the result of his 
first visit, has been widely read alike in America 
and in li is native France. 

Joseph Knight, editor of "Notes and Queries" 
since 1883 and oldest of the London dramatic critics 
died ten days ago. Mr. Knight was seventy-eight 
years old. He was known far and wide as a book 
collector. 

. The engagement of Jacob A. Riis, the famous 
author and reformer, and Miss Mary Phillips is 
announced. Miss Phillips is a St. Louis girl 0/ 
varied talents. She met Mr. Riis while she was 
engaged in settlement work. 

Capt. Richmond P. Hobson has written his first 
book — a boy's story of navy life — into which it is 
said he has put his own experiences at Annapolis. 

( lahriele d'Annunzio has been giving an inter- 
viewer some self-appreciatives concerning his own 
greatness. "From my crucible.", he declares, "has 
issued the only poem of the complete life — of soul 
and body — that has appeared since the 'Divina 
Commcdia.' " 

Richard Le Gallienne was in an elevator in a 
New York building last week when the lift fell 
itories. The poet was injured and there are 
rival writers mean enough to hint that the accident 
was due to the fact that the well known literary 
light dazzled the conductor. 

Dr. Manuel Amador, president of the Republic 
of Panama, landed in New York July 4 and remained 
until July 11. when he sailed for Europe. He is 
traveling incognito and will not accept the honors 
due to the head of the smallest republic on this 
side of the world. 

Prince William of Sweden, who will visit the 
United States next year, is studying with the idea 
of obtaining the real American pronunciation. The 
prince speaks English but he wants the genuine 
Yankee accent. 

Louis M. Kenner, last surviving member of the 
famous Louisiana returning board which defeated 
Samuel J. Tilden and made Rutherford B. Hayes 
President, died in New Orleans Wednesday night. 
Kenner was a mulatto. 

Alfred Noyes, the English poet, is engaged to 
Miss Garnett Holmes, a relative of Oliver Wendell 
Holmes. It is expected that the marriage will take 
place in London this summer. 

Senor Don Angel Ugarte, commissioned as Minis- 
ter to Washington by the new provisional govern- 
ment of Honduras, arrived in Washington to dis- 
cover that he had no post, as the United States has 
not yet recognized the government that he repre- 
sents. 

Herbert Ward, the English sculptor, who has his 
studio in Paris, devotes himself chiefly to modelling 
negro men and women. He has made statues from 
African natives of every race from Dahomey to the 
Sudan and from the Congo to Zululand. 



Queenship of Women 

In ,1 recent criticism on "The Manners of Ameri- 
can Women" Henry James says: "Manners are a 
help in life — a help not only to avoid certain \ ii 
Inn t" bear with certain virtues." He also says 
that "the man in America may correct his wife when 
be can. just as the mother may correct her daughter 
when she dares: but no mere man may correct a 
mere woman in any contingency whatever, since 
this undermines the whole theory of queenship at 
which we have glanced." The American woman, 
by her assumption of authority and the tolerance 
of the American man in the matter of criticism, is, 
according to Mr. James, "faring all unconscious but 
all doomed into the strangest desert of solitude and 
ignorance." 

]Lomia leach 



Facing 
the 
Park 
and 


Hotel Savoy 


Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 


EUROPEAN PLAN 


Close 


Everything New 


Home 


to 


No. 142-144 Pacific Avenue 


Phone 


Ocean 


Long Beach, Cal. 


1743 



Phone Home 441 




tflfre jRtutpra 



The Largest and Leading 

Hotel in Long 

Beach 

Modern in all its 
Appointments .. 

M. A. SCHUTZ, M. D. 

Proprietor 

Massage and Turkish Baths in Connection 

Rooms $3.00 per Week and Up 

Corner Second and Chestnut Sts. Long Beach, Cal. 



.THE WESTPHALIA. 



M. J. BLAISDELL. Proprietor 



1 30 West, Third Street. 

ROOMS- -Prices from 75 cents per d.ay and up 



Home Phone I 183 Sunset 3443 

Model Yale (European) 

Corner First and Pacific Ave. 

and "SURF VIEW" on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M. WORMLEY. Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies, Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread, "Like mother used to make" 

Home Phone 107S 

114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Stray Notes of Interest 

Despite much stricter laws to regulate it, the 
annual immigration to America from foreign coun- 
tries has nearly doubled within fifteen years. In 
1892, it was 579,633 ; in 1906, it was 1,100,735. 

Mrs. Annie Gayhardt, of Baltimore, is the mother 
of 14 children, all boys' and all healthy. Death has 
never invaded the family circle. To preside over 
such a household is a feat that calls for a striking 
display of energy. There are seven or eight beds 
to be made up for every night's repose. Family 
meals proceed by relays, as there is not room 
enough for all at one table. They come in squads, 
and bring such hearty appetites with them that a 
barrel of flour lasts only two weeks, although 
helped out by supplies of baker's bread. 

The Garibaldi memorial pantheon was dedicated 
with Masonic ceremonies July 4 at Rosebank, 
Staten Island, on the one hundredth anniversary of 
the Italian patriot's birth. The concrete building 
is built over and around the cottage in which Gari- 
baldi lived in 1850 to 1853 with his 'friend Antonio 
Meucci. 

Ambassador Reid's reception at Dorchester 
House July 4 eclipsed in size and splendor any en- 
tertainment ever given at the American Embassy in 
London. More than 5,000 guests passed through 
the spacious rooms of the famous residence between 
the hours of four and six o'clock. 

.Corrected returns show that the total registration 
in Manila was 7,046 natives and 856 Americans. The 
Cable News, discussing the smallness of the regis- 
tration, says that under these circumstances inde- 
pendence would mean that a few Filipinos would 
make the laws to govern eight millions. 

A real Russian "chie" copied after the Cafe 
Comerchesky in. Odessa has been opened in New 
York. This tea house serves vodka and other drinks 
much stronger than the American draught that 
cheers. 

The autodrome planned by the Kaiser will be de- 
signed to eclipse anything of the kind in the world. 
It will be equipped not only with several straight- 
away graded tracks for short distance racing, but 
with a magnificent long distance course, thirty-one 
miles long, made to resemble a rural highway. There 
will be a series of dangerous curves, descents and 
hazards, while the grand stands will accommodate 
something like a million onlookers. 

An incident in the recent pilgrimage of the Primi- 
tive Methodists to Mowcop for the centenary cele- 
bration was the pledging of a memorial fund of 
$1,350,000. 

Two plays are now running in Paris dealing with 
the discord and unhappiness brought into French 
family life by the present day struggle between free 
thought and Christianity. 

The most noted colony of sea birds, and the larg- 
est on the Atlantic coast south of Greenland, is 
situated in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, fifty miles 
north of Cape Breton. 

Olga Nethersole is astonishing Paris by daring 
to play "Camille" and "Adrienne Lecouvreur" in 
the city in which Sarah Bernhardt considers her- 
self supreme in these two dramas. 



AUTOMOBILE NOTES 



Power Transmission for Autos 

Many months have elapsed since the question of 
the relative advantages of the chair and shaft meth- 
ods of. final transmission ceased to be discussed in 
every garage and shop, says the. Motor World. 
Formerly it was hotly championed on both sides 
and, as a matter of fact, at one time it was about 
the most discussed point ever contested by the 
motoring public, barring only that as to the proper 
engine position. Continued efficient service of 
many different makes embodying both types, how- 
ever, has eliminated all but the finer discriminations 
as to absolute fitness for the work, and the ultimate 
decision appears to have been passed from the com- 
mittee of public opinion to the jury of design, 
whose verdicts are coming more and more to be ac- 
cepted without demur. 

At present there is a tendency to use the double 
chain transmission on the heavier types of machine, 
while the shaft type is employed on the medium 
weight cars for the most part, the single chain ar- 
rangement being left for the makers of the very 
light cars with an amount of use which is almost 
negligible in considering the actual trend. Excep- 
tions exist both as to heavier and lighter cars, to be 
sure, but the generality of machines appear to be 
distinguished as indicated. Nor in their develop- 
ment on the road does there appear to be any con- 
clusion pointing to absolute superiority on either 
hand. In efficiency the chain type has the ad- 
vantage by something like 10 per cent, when the 
chains are new and clean. Unfortunately, however, 
the chains do not remain so for any length of time, 
so that it is probable that in general practice the ad- 
vantage in efficiency leans toward the side of the 
cardan shaft. With the practice of overpowering 
most cars now current, on the other hand, the slight 
loss in efficiency is hardly material, so that other 
things being equal the disadvantages as to power 
losses may be counted about equal. 



Speed Regulation in Nevada. 

The Legislature of the State of Nevada has un- 
der consideration a measure for the regulation of 
automobiles which would limit the speed of motor 
vehicles to ten miles an hour in the cities and 
twenty miles an hour in the country, with a ten 
mile an hour limit for all places after nightfall. 
Very heavy fines are provided, especially for fail- 
ure to stop machines when signalled, for which a 
jail sentence may be imposed, and a like punish- 
ment may be given for a second offense in ex- 
ceeding the speed limit. Most of the automobil- 
ists in the cities are said to be favorably disposed 
toward the bill, as there has ben a great deal of 
reckless drivng, with some serious consequences. 

* * * 

CHiKxiaHua Dog's Becoming Extinct 

The Chihuahua dog, which as late as twenty-five 
years ago was quite commonly to be found in Mex- 
ico, is a curious little creature, popularly supposed 
to be a cross-breed between the prairie dog and the 
jack rabbit, writes Consul-General Gottschalk of 
Mexico City to the Department of Commerce and 
Labor. The animal resembles a small dog, whose 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



weight is sometimes not over one and one-half 
pounds, with a disproportionately large head, bulg- 
ing eyes, and long ears. The hair is usually scanty, 
showing the pink skin underneath. One of the 
mark- is said to be an unclosed cranial fissure, 
through which the brain can he felt throbbing un- 
derneath the skin. These little animals are particu- 
larly destructive, ami are constantly scratching at 
things with their long claws. They are quite sus- 
ceptible of taming, if taken young, and in numerous 
instances the breed has been domesticated, although 
they seldom show the usual dog traits of sagacious 
and intelligent attachment. 

Unfortunately within the last twenty-five years 
the breed has become so largely mixed with small 
3 of various mongrel types that it is now a most 
difficult thing to find in Mexico an example of the 
true breed. Such are sold occasionally at prices 
ranging from 200 Mexican pesos (99.60 United 
States currency) upward. Even in Chihuahua 
these dogs are very rare. A few recent specimens 
sold in this city are said to have been specimens of 
the true breed. 

* * * 

In Cold Storage 

First Tourist — What are you writing down? Sec- 
ond Tourist — I'm making a note of a few things 
that have made an indelible impression upon my 
memory, so I shan't forget them. — Chicago Journal. 

* * * 
Bacon Undone 

George Bernard Shaw has dealt a body blow to 
the Baconian theory. He has pointed out that if 
you take the titles of eleven of Shakespeare's plays, 



arrange them in the proper order and mark the 
fourth letter from the end of each you will find 
that they spell the name of the real author of the 
so-called Shakespearean plays. Mere is the Shaw 
crj ptogram : 

MacBeth, 

Julius Ca Esai . 

Comedy of ErRors, 

Nhr, bant of VcNice, 

Antony and CleopAtra, 

lu<i Gentlemen of VeRona, 

Merry Wives of WinDsor, 

Troilus and CresSida, 

Timon of At I Ions, 
Antony and CleopAtra. 
All's Well That Ends Well. 

* * * 

The Poet Laureate's Drivel 

We hear of the present "slump in poetry," but 
this is perhaps the worst example we have seen. It 
is the first stanza of a poem entitled "Pretty Kitty!" 
"Around the world I've wandered twice, 

But in its fairest city 
I never found a girl more nice 
Than merry little Kitty." 
Doubtless it is only the signature of England's 
Laureate, Henry Austin, which has saved this 
drivel !-"-for none of it is any better — from the 
waste basket. "More nice!" Shades of Tennyson! 

* * * 

SHarpsHooting 

Captain — Do you see that captain on the bridge 
five miles away? Tar — Aye, aye. sir. "Let him 
have one of those 12-inch shells in the eye." 
"Which eye, sir?" — Desert News. 













THE WAYSIDE PRESS 




214 FRANKLIN STREET 




Printers, Designers, Binders 


jOR 




The Character of the Work Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 




~f ^ 




QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 








Home A 1853 —Phones— Main 1566 






PRINTING THAT TALKS 









■YOU TAKE A BIG RISK- 



When Your Dealer Says to You 

"We have our own brand, which costs less because we 
don't have any advertising expense;'' or, "This is just as good 
and costs less;'' or, "We know this brand and recommend it. 
The kind you ask for costs more, and you couldn't tell the 
difference." 



If you take his advice nstead of insisting 
on the advertised brand 



You asked him for what you wanted — probably 
because advertising of one kind or another had 
convinced you. 

The manufacturer who did that advertising did it 
at considerable expense to prove to you that his 
goods were worth trying. 

If he didn't use every care to make them just as 
perfect as he knew how, he couldn't hope that they 
would convince you of their merit when you tried 
them. Yet he spent his money to reach you with 
his arguments, trusting to his goods to prove them. 

Isn't it pretty certain, then, that they are good of 
their kind? 

When he has created a general demand for his 
goods, in come the imitators, trading on his demand 
— the "just as good" and all the rest, with no care- 
fully built up reputation to preserve, no expensively 
bought business to endanger, and probabiy little or 
no expense in making the product they hope to sub- 
stitute for the advertised article. 

YOUR SAFETY lies in the advertised brand- 
back of it is the makers' guarantee and the maga- 
zine's guarantee. The Dealer who offers you some- 
thing "just as good" isn't good enough for you. Tell 
him his guarantee is not good enough and 



Have you ever traded at a store whose policy is 
never to advertise? Did it not try to convince you 
that its goods were cheaper than its competitors' — 
because it had no advertising bills to pay? Don't 
believe such arguments — go to the advertised store 
and see for yourself. 

ARE THESE FACTS VITAL TO YOU 

The advertised store has a better and more up-to- 
date stock — it turns its stock quickly by advertising 
and fills the space with new goods. 

The advertised store has better and more ex- 
perienced clerks — it knows the goods it sells. 

The advertised store cheerfully rectifies all mis- 
takes — you go away feeling pleased and return with 
your friends. 

The advertised firm adopts the newest and best 
in every department, and conducts its business with 
a modern business system. 

The advertised store is invariably more reliable, 
and you can depend upon the quality of the goods 
it advertises. 

Can you find these things in the store whose policy 
is— never to advertise? 

Advertising is business promotion — it is the fuel 
that keeps the boilers hot — and the merchant who 
does it systematically is a Twentieth Century busi- 
ness man. 

He spends his money to convince you that the 
^"oods he advertises are as represented, and he will 
make good. Trade with the advertiser — purchase 
advertised goods — they are more reliable' and — cost 
no more. 



ASK AGAIN FOR WHAT YOU WANT 
"AND INSIST ON GETTING IT Hi" 



Los Angrier, California 



SLory of a Newspaper Conspiracy 



July 20. 1907 




- 











imiiHiiimMWMiwv"* —%k 





^I^^^^T^u TH FU L^^^ 




SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 




.\Veekly 

1 _adI ESS 



BY THE YEAR $ 25° 




These cool and comfortable summer suits are very much in demand this 
season, they are very desirable for vacation and outing suits, are thor- 
oughly washable and durable. We are showing them in many nobby 
and approved styles, delicate and pronounced patterns that are in vogue, 
in a number of different materials. The low prices at which they are 
marked make them doubly interesting. You will find it to your advan- 
tage to look these suits over before purchasing elsewhere. 



"SOA\ETMl 



' O I.N O ' 



BROADWAY 




cor Firm st. 




WHAT 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

OFFERS 

A thorough training in the science of a great pro- 
fession. 

A useful professional career and an opportunity 
to benefit suffering humanity. 

POSITION— INFLUENCE— WEALTH 

Prepare to enter our fall term. Send for free 
booklet to J. W. Cook, Secretary, Daly St. and 
Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Teachers for California 

fflltE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
' ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month. <J If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-operative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



hsusuro 




George Baker Jtnderson 
EDITOR 



Jt Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland l^inkaid 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gatloupe 

MANAGER — —. 



Published every Saturday at 422*423 Chamber of Com* 
merce Bulld'.ng, Los Angeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on alt news stands. 

FntcreJ 11 second-class milter April i, 1907, at the postomcc at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congres* of U ireb .. 1879. 



Vol. J. 



Los Angeles, Cat., July 20, 1907 No. 3 



The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a cop) of it 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 



"We need clean, healthy newspapers, with clean, 
healthy criticism which shall be FEARLESS AND 
TRUTHFUL."— Theodore Roosevelt. 

COMMENT 

When, during his remarkable address at Simpson 
auditorium, Francis J. Heney made this statement: 
"I am going back to San Francisco to put Pat Cal- 
houn in the penitentiary, and when I am through, 
beware, Harrison Gray Otis, that I don't come back 
and put you in the penitentiary," there doubtless 
were some who thought that the intrepid graft 
prosecutor was indulging in a bit of buncombe, of 

"play to the galleries." Others doubtless 
Heney's believed that Mr. Heney had in mind 
Threat criminal libel proceedings against the 

proprietor of the Times. Although in 
one part of his address Mr. Heney hinted broadly 
at libel proceedings, the Pacific Outlook is in a posi- 
tion to state definitely that what Mr. Heney had in 
mind when he uttered these words was the part 
borne by General Otis in the conspiracy entered 
into by the Times, the Examiner and the 
Herald which resulted in the simultaneous raising 
of the prices of the Sunday editions of these three 
papers from five to ten cents. 
* * * 
The conspiracy which resulted in the raising of 
the prices of these papers was entered into, or be- 
came effective, in March. The Cartwright anti- 
trust law, approved March 23, went into effect May 
23 following. Though the proprietors of these three 



papers knew of the law. they continued to violate 
certain provisions thereof by the maintenance of 
the high prices agreed upon as the result of their 
conspiracy until Sunday, July 14, when simultane- 
ously the prices of these papers were fixed at five 
cents. H will be seen from these items that there is 

abundant prima facie evidence of con- 
Newspaper certed action as the result of an 
Conspiracy agreement among the responsible 

heads of these three papers. But 
when Mr. Heney begins his proceedings for the 
punishment of General Otis and any others who 
were parties to the conspiracy he will not have to 
depend upon this evidence alone. That certain per- 
sons representing each of these papers, possibly 
upon the initiative of General Otis himself, held a 
conference at which it was mutually agreed that 
upon a specified date the prices of the Sunday edi- 
tions of their papers should be raised from five 
cents to ten cents, is definitely known. Regardless 
of the denials which may be made, this statement 
is a fact and susceptible of complete proof. 

* * * 

The provisions of the Cartwright law are of a 
most sweeping character. The law completely 
covers just such cases as this. The title and the 
text of the law make it plain that the persons enter- 
ing into the agreement to which reference has been 
made laid themselves liable to fine or imprisonment 
or both when, after the twenty-third day of May, 
1907, they maintained the prices of the Sunday edi- 
tion at ten. cents each. Their act is declared in the 
law to be a "conspiracy against trade." "Any per- 
son who may become engaged in a - ny 
What the isuch conspiracy," says the statute, "or 
Law Says take part therein, or aid or advise in 
its commission, or who shall as prin- 
cipal, manager, director, agent, servant or employee, 
or in any other capacity, knowingly carry out any 
of the stipulations, purposes, prices, rates, or fur- 
nish any information to assist in carrying out such 
purpose, or order thereunder or in pursuance there- 
of, shall be punished by a fine of not less than fifty 
($50) dollars nor more than five thousand ($5,000) 
dollars, or be imprisoned not less than six months 
nor more than one year, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment. Each day's violation of this pro- 
vision shall constitute a separate offense." 

* * * 

It is noteworthy, in passing, that the Times, 
egregiously hypocritical every day in the week. 



Pacific Outlook 



Sunday included, advocated the passage of the Cart- 
wright law, and since its enactment and approval 
has loudly proclaimed it to be a just measure, af- 
fording protection to that class of business which 
lias suffered most as the' result of conspiracies in 
retraint of trade. For the past two or three weeks 
it lias kept standing, in large type, its declaration 
of principles — "What the Times stands for :" and 
"The Times is against — " Among the things which 
the Times is "against," according to its public pro- 
fessions, are "all forms of attempted monopoly of 

the industries, by whomsoever 

Fine and Prison undertaken." This declaration 

the Penalty is signed personally by "H. G. 

Otis, editor and general man- 
ager." But possibly the Times does not regard the 
production of a newspaper as an "industry." But 
whether it does or not, it has been violating the 
Cartwright anti-trust law ; it knows that it has been 
doing so, and in order to square itself as far as pos- 
sible — but not until after the famous speech of Mr. 
Heney — it became a party, probably taking the 
initiative to that .end, to the abolition of the ten cent 
rate for the Sunday papers. Since the law became 
effective each of these papers has published seven 
Sunday editions during the fifty-two days elapsing 
between May 23 and July 14. Problem : If Heney 
gets after Otis and his fellow-conspirators and 
"makes good," what will the aggregate punishment 
amount to? 

* * * 

In his rather sensational speech before the City 
Club last Saturday City Auditor Mushet did little 
more than emphasize assertions regarding the busi- 
ness management of Los Angeles which he had pre- 
viously made. Six months ago he publicly declared 
that the city was being fleeced out of many thou- 
sands of dollars annually as the result of the loose 
system by which the business of the corporation 
was transacted. In his address before the City 
Club he put his declaration in a new dress, probably 

in the belief that it might 

Where Los Angeles more profoundly impress 

Has Failed those who already were 

more or less familiar with 
the facts. Mr. Mushet is one of the most useful of 
the city's officials. Some think that, he is the most 
valuable employe of the city. Unquestionably he is 
doing everything in his power, as a conscientious 
public official should do, to see that square, honest 
business methods, are employed in the conduct of 
the city's financial affairs. When he makes the 
declaration that "the city of Los Angeles is the 
most gigantic failure, from a purely business point 
of view, that I have ever seen," taxpayers will do 
well to pause long enough to consider seriously 
what he says. 



Mr. Mushet characterizes as nothing short of 
criminal the waste of the city's money in purchas- 
ing supplies for years past. He has pointed out 
this fact repeatedly. He has officially called the at- 
tention of the council to the wasteful extravagance 
of various municipal departments, to the criminal 
derelictions which have resulted in the payment of 
bills against the city without legal warrant, and 
what has the council done? Over his protests on 
more than one 'occasion it has authorized the ex- 
penditure of moneys when it knew, .upon his au- 
thoritative statement, that in so doing it was violat- 
ing the ordinary principles of business, if not doing 

something more reprehensible. For 

Too Much fifteen years, according to his asser- 

Politics tion, three-fourths of the demands 

against the city passing through the 
hands of the auditor have been "irregular" — a very 
generous term. If he had stated the cold truth 
more brutally he would have said that many of 
these demands passing muster in the auditor's of- 
fice during the terms of some of his predecessors 
were a crooked as a Cape Cod apple tree — and there 
is nothing in the vegetable world more crooked. 
But we fear that Mr. Mushet's warning will meet 
the fate accorded his earlier efforts to secure the 
correction of the evil to which he refers. The pres- 
ent administration is a dandy spender. And there 
are many favorites whose demands will be paid, 
whether "on the square" or not, with or without the 
consent of the auditor's department. Politics is 
king — yet. 

* * * 

The repeated disclosures made by Mr. Mushet 
emphasize the necessity of great vigilance in the 
inspection of demands against the city. More than 
that, as it has been shown that the disapproval of 
the auditor frequently counts for naught something 
ought to be done to render it less difficult, if not 
impossible, to procure the payment of unreason- 
able or illegal demands. The time will soon be here 
when the city will begin the expenditure of twenty- 
three millions of dollars for the construction of the 
Owens river aqueduct. It has been demonstrated 
that Mr. Mushet has all that he can attend to in 

looking over the regular demands 
One Way to against the city. To give complete 
Prevent Graft assurance that the possibility for 

graft in the Owens river enterprise 
will be reduced to the minimum, if not entirely 
eliminated, why not safeguard the interests of the 
taxpayers by engaging a disinterested firm of char- 
tered public accountants to maintain a continuous 
audit of the records? Such a concern could work in 
perfect harmony with the city auditor's department, 
and independent supervision of this character 
would give assurance that expenditures of this 



Pacific Outlook 






money wen- b< fully watched, would inspire 

confidence in financial circles and would materially 

• in the floating of the bond issue. It is better 

ible door before the horse is stolen. 

r to preveni fraud than to punish it. 

* *f * 

A. K. Loder, an assistant engineer attached to 
office of public roads in the United Stales De- 
partment of Agriculture, is in Los Angeles for the 
purpose of conferring with the now highway com- 
mission and the Good Roads Association and ad- 
vising with them in their work of making plans for 
the construction of the proposed highway system 
in Los Angeles county. Mr. Loder is recognized as 
an expert in this work. He has built scientific 
roads in many states. Probably the first 
Highway thing he will find to do will be to assist 
Expert the association in finding stone of the 
right quality for use upon the roads. 
While he is here in an advisory capacity only, it is 
to lie presumed that bis recommendations will be 
accepted and acted upon by the authorities, for. 
though we have many men who have paid a good 
deal of attention to the subject of highway improve- 
ment, none of them is presumptuous enough to sug- 
gest that he knows more about the subject than a 
rnment expert whose life has been devoted to 
this work. 

* * * 

It is to be hoped that the services of Mr. Loder 
while he is with us will not go for naught. But 
even the most ardent advocates of the movement 
for good roads find that the project is yet confront- 
ed with a menace. In deference to public senti- 
ment, we believe. Captain Banning — personally a 
most estimable gentleman — has retired from the 
highway commission and the Board of Supervisors 
has named in his place a man who is generally re- 
garded as free from suspicion of being 
One Thing identified with the Southern Pacific 
Needful political machine. The action of Cap- 
tain Banning has clarified the atmo- 
sphere somewhat, but there remains another step to 
be taken before the people will cease to regard that 
body with suspicion. Martin Marsh, a professional 
politician, a machine man of pronounced stripe, 
should resign from the commission and the super- 
visors should appoint in bis place some man in 
whom the taxpayers generally will have confidence. 
Until that is done there will be thousands of citi- 
zens who will feel it their duty to vote against the 
bond issue. 

¥ * * 

The argument has been advanced — and it at first 
appealed to the 1'acitie Outlook — that the presence 
of one distinctly machine politician on the commis- 



sion was not sufficient cause for the defeat .if the 
bonds. But after mature deliberation we have 

reached the conclusion that the identification of Mr. 

Marsh or an) either machine politician with the 
commission should insure the defeat 
Minority of the bonds. If the supervisors 
Might Rule should decide to turn down the 
recommendations of the majoritj oi 
the commission as now constituted — Messrs. Dag- 
gett and Bixby, for example — and act upon the 
recommendations captained in a minority report — 
a report made. say. by Mr. Marsh — the voters of 
Los Angeles might kick themselves for fools, figura- 
tively speaking, for having been misled into voting 
the bonds because of their belief that the super- 
visors would be influenced by the moral pressure 
of our leading civic organizations. 

* * * 

The supervisors have given ample evidence of the 
fact that "moral suasion" is wasted upon them. 
When the Chamber of Commerce, the Merchants' 
and Manufacturers' Association, the Municipal 
League, the City Club and the Good Roads Associa- 
tion made it plain to the supervisors that the people 
would not stand for the selection of men of the class 
"originally named for membership on the commis- 
sion, the "solid three" set up a great hee-haw. A 
whole lot will they be budged by 
Farce of the moral influences that may be 

Moral Suasion exercised to keep them in line. If, 
less than a month ago, they gave 
the laugh to such organizations of prominent busi- 
ness men as those mentioned, wdio is there soft 
enough to believe that, with the administration of 
three millions of dollars in their hands, the voters 
having expressed their faith in the power of moral 
influence, these three cheap political tools will hesi- 
tate to follow their own sweet will in the matter of 
administering the funds? 

* * * 

The Pacific Outlook wants to see the proposed 
road improvement project carried out. So do the 
great majority of the people of Los Angeles county, 
without doubt. But a sober second thought impels 
us to declare that we will fight the proposition to 
the finish so long as a man like Martin Marsh re- 
mains on the commission. Such influence as we 
may possess will be thrown against the bond issue 
if the name of Mr. Marsh or that of any other 
recognized machine politician remain associated 
with that of Mr. Bixby and Mr. Daggett. We be- 
lieve that the people of Los Angeles county will not 
stand for any commission which numbers among its 
members a man like Mr. Marsh who. no matter how 

much he may know or may not know about g 1 

road construction, is recognized as a thorough ma- 
chine politician. At the outset the Pacific Out! 



Pacific Outlook 



took the ground that the only safe course to pursue 
was to insist that the super- 
No Compromise visors name a commission every 
Acceptable member of which was above 

suspicion of being even slightly 
under the domination of the Southern Pacific ma- 
chine. Though at first flush inclined to accept a 
compromise temporarily, in the hopes that Mr. 
Marsh might see his way to retire voluntarily and 
that the supervisors might finally accede to the de- 
mands of the public and appoint in his place a man 
acceptable to all, we are now firmly convinced that 
the people will have nothing to do with a com- 
promise of any character whatever. The Pacific 
Outlook will not, at any rate. Mr. Marsh must re- 
tire and a thoroughly acceptable man must be 
named in his place, or in all probability the bonds 
will be defeated when the issue comes before the 
people! The voters of Los Angeles city and Los 
Angeles county are thoroughly sick of and disgust- 
ed with Parkerian antics and Pattersonian "ex- 
planations." Let Mr. Marsh get off the commission 
at once and let the supervisors name an acceptable 
man in his place or the good roads movement is 
doomed. 

* ¥ * 

Under its new management the Los Angeles Her- 
ald should become one of the ablest and strongest 
morning dailies on the coast. While there is a wide- 
spread impression that none but experienced news- 
paper men may succeed in making a daily publica- 
tion interesting, this should be true in regard to 
the news department only. We see no reason why 
an experienced, thoughtful man of affairs — a law- 
yer, a financier of broad mind, a manufacturer who 
is a wide reader and a profound student, for exam- 
ple — should not be as capable a critic and com- 
mentator as a man "brought up" in newspaper 
work. Former Judge Thomas E. Gibbon, who as- 
sumes the editorial management of the Herald, is 
well qualified to discuss matters affecting the prog- 
ress and welfare of the city, state and nation. While 
the Herald will continue to espouse Democratic 
principles, it promises to remain independent in 

local affairs. One sentence taken 
Herald's New from the announcement of the new 
Management management is significant : "As the 

owners of the Herald have never 
been able to appreciate how party politics has any 
more logical relation to administering the busi- 
ness affairs of a city or county than it has to 
properly conducting the business of a bank or dry 
goods store, the Herald, on all matters of city and 
county government, will be absolutely independent; 
endeavoring to apply alike to questions and candi- 
dates in their relations to local government the one 
rule of advocating that which it deems to be to the 
highest and best interests of the community that it 



serves. The party organization and the candidate 
who can be always assured of the unrelenting op- 
position of the Herald is the party organization 
which shall be dominated by special interests or 
public service corporations, and the candidate 
whose political sponsors and support are found in 
the ranks of such influences." 

* * * 

During the municipal campaign of 1906 the Her- 
ald flatly announced that it would oppose the 
nominee of either partisan machine, and it kept 
faith with the people in this particular ; so the pol- 
icy outlined by the new owners is not a new one. 
From many viewpoints the Herald has been, for 
some time, a clean, well edited newspaper, and the 
character of the men who have obtained control is 
a guaranty that it will continue along these lines. 
The day has passed when a daily paper which is 
recognized as the mouthpiece of the bosses of a 
political party is a power in the community in 
which it is published. To win and hold the con- 
fidence of the people it must be- 

And Its friend those projects which are in- 
Possibilities spired by a desire to see right, jus- 
tice, truth and good government tri- 
umphant. However great the temporary success of 
a partisan organ may be, such success is sure to be 
turned into failure in the end, unless the manage- 
ment of such organ' see and profit by public opinion. 
Many a once powerful American journal has gone 
to seed simply because of the fact that its manage- 
ment has blindly and obstinately adhered to a 
rigidly partisan and pro-corporation policy. If the 
Herald's new management keep faith with itself 
and with the people of Los Angeles along the lines 
indicated in its editorial announcement, there is no 
good reason why it ultimately should not become 
one of the most influential and widely read news- 
papers on theracific coast. 

* * * 

Under any circumstances the inhabitants of Los 
Angeles are to be congratulated upon the change in 
the Herald's management. For a long period Gen- 
eral Otis has practically controlled the policy of 
that paper. It was shown, about two years ago, 
that the Herald could not be bought of the Times's 
management unless the purchasers allowed them- 
selves to be hedged in by restrictions which, if abid- 
ed by, would have rendered any material change in 
the management of that paper of little value to the 
public. But under the conduct of Judge Gibbon it 
may be safely predicted that the Herald will stand 
shoulder to shoulder with the 
How the Press Express in advocating purity in 

May Stand municipal government and the 

inherent rights of the people. 

Judge Gibbon's record indicates that such will be 

the attitude of the paper whose policies he will con- 



Pacific Outlook 



1 






trol. It was he, individually and practically al 
who made the San Pedro harbor a possibility, li 
ilmosl solely through hi> efforts that the Salt 
Lake railroad was built to Los Angeles. He has 
those projects which have been calculated 
to advance the host interests of the whole people, 
politically, and it is not likely that at his time of 
life, and with his splendid record behind him, he 
will "turn turtle" and make the Herald in artj sens, 

a sponsor for questionable ideals. 
* * * 

Just as the Express — by all odds the most satis- 
factory newspaper in Los Angeles for some time 
past — and the Herald under its new management will 
he champions of the cause of good government, the 
Examiner and the Record may be depended upon 
mtinue to represent the extreme view in regard 
to the relations between capital and labor, the 
Record standing consistently and always radically 
for labor, while the Examiner will be- 
Three friend labor between times of crisis and 
Classes cut labor's throat when it finds it profit- 
able to do so: and the Times and the 
News, now tied closely together by a bond of com- 
mon sympathy — devotion to the cause of the sacred 
vested interests of the community — may be de- 
pended upon to stick closer than a leech to militant 
tl ough decaying industrial monopoly. This is the 
obvious future classification of the daily papers of 
Los Angeles. The people may pay their money — 
five cents for the Sunday editions hereafter — and 
take their choice. 

* * * 
Mayor Harper's plan for weekly cabinet meet- 
ings, in which he may consult with members of the 
council and the heads of the various municipal de- 
partments, is directly in line with a suggestion 
made in the Pacific Outlook during the early days 
of his administration. The idea is a good one, and 
in it the mayor should receive the hearty co-opera- 
tiou of all the city officials, ft is a fact to be de- 
plored that since the beginning of the present ad- 
ministration the mayor and the council have been 
pulling in opposite directions 
For a Better much of the time, probably be- 
Understanding cause of the fact that each depart- 
ment has not quite understood the 
other. This playing at cross purposes is bound to 
result in unnecessary antagonism. If the mayor 
and the council and the Board of Public Works and 
other important city departments will keep more 
closely in touch with one another much of the un- 
pleasantness of the past will be obviated and civil 
government hi Los Angeles will be conducted more 
smoothly and to the greater satisfaction of the peo- 
ple. The mayor has hit the nail on the head in 
recommending weekly conferences of the executive 
ami administrative departments of the city. 



It did not need an emphatic protest on the part 

of the Chamber of Commerce to direct the atten- 
tion of the people of Los Angeles t" an abomination 
which ma) easily he undone. The smoke nuisance 
in this city has been the subject of much discussion 
and little action. Other cities have found a way in 
which to rid themselves of this menace to the 
health and happiness of their inhabitants, and Los 
\ngclcs should not rest until it has compelled the 
authors of this noxious offense to desist from pour- 

ing deleterious fumes over the city 

Pittsburg day and night. A few days ago a 

cf the West gentleman from Harrisburg, J 'a.. 

who has been attending the N. E. A. 
convention, declared that Los Angeles was entitled 
to be called the "Pittsburg of the West" by reason 
of the smokiness of its atmosphere. If we allow the 
impression to go forth that we are willing to toler- 
ate this form of nuisance much longer we shall de- 
serve the name suggested. There are many ways in 
which the smoke nuisance may be abolished, but 
we may depend upon it that nothing will be done 
by the offending corporations and individuals until 
drastic measures are adopted to force them to put 
an end to this source of contamination. 

* * * 

Regardless of whether William F.' Herrin pays 
the penalty for his alleged crimes or not, it is ex- 
tremely doubtful if he will ever boss another state 
convention of the Republican party in California. 
He mav make his presence felt at one more — just 
one. but it will be the last that dances to the snap 
of his quirt. The Republican party in California 

must and shall be purified. It 

Days of the Boss must and shall kick out the un- 

Are Numbered conscionable scallawags and 

tricksters who have made its 
name a jest and a by-word throughout the nation. 
It must clean house. And it must do its own work. 
It must accord to the Herrins and the Parkers and 
the Ruefs and the Schmitzes the same treatment 
that it would give to a sneak thief or a burglar that 
a man finds in his home. These men are pests. 
They are like the leech that fastens itself upon the 
belly of the fish. Xero probably turns over in his 
grave every time the name of California is spoken. 

* * * 

But how get rid of the Herrins and the Parkers 
and other disciples of Tweedism in California.-' By 
waiting until election time rolls around ami voting 
for one machine candidate or the other, taking a 
choice between two evils, one usually as great as 
the other? Not much! "You may elect any candi- 
date you please." remarked Tweed, the original 
Herrin, "if you will let me name the can- 
How To didates." How long will it be before the 
Do It Republicans of California are thoroughly 
aroused to the fact that the only way to 
get rid of Herrin, in the event that Spreckels and 



Pacific Outlook 



Henej' fail to dispose of him fo\ a few years, along 
with Ruef and Schmitz and Calhoun, is to kick him 
bodily out of every party convention which he en- 
ters; to recognize the men he hires to do his despic- 
able work and treat them in the same manner; or, 
better still, to make it impossible that the Herrins 
and the Parkers get so much as a peep, into the con- 
vention hall? 

* * * 

The latter is the true solution of the question. 
Better to keep the Herrins and the Parkers out than 
to be compelled to kick them out after they are in. 
It is a simple matter — more simple than some may 
imagine — for all that is needed is organization. 
There is no doubt that ninety per cent of the rank 
and file of the Republican party in California will 
enter with spirit into an organized movement to 
dethrone these usurpers, these despots ; but — so 
weak is human nature ! — of that 
"Organization" possible ninety per cent about 

the Slogan eighty-nine per cent are waiting 
for the one per cent of militant 
and fearless 'spirits to start the game. Well, 
Messrs. Eighty-Nine Per Cent, the game will open 
soon. Some of you may be too late to get seats on 
the ground floor, but by the time the game reaches 
its most exciting stage you will all wish that you 
had applied for admission earlier. There is some- 
thing very catchy about that phrase coined b)' 
Abraham Lincoln — government "by the people, of 
the people and for the people ;" and it is coming for 
California. 

* * * 

It is to be hoped that the Church Federation will 
continue to sleep with one eye open until final ac- 
tion on the anti-prize fight ordinance has been 
taken by the council. By the terms of the proposed 
ordinance no boxing match shall last longer than 
ten rounds, no gloves lighter than eight ounces in 
weight shall be used, and no decision shall be ren- 
dered by a referee as to the result of the contest. 
Such an ordinance would put an end to all betting, 
except in cases where knockout blows were ad- 
ministered ; and with betting a thing of the past 

the interest in this form of sport 

Prize Fighting among the gambling fraternity 

and Boxing , would soon wane. Boxing for 

points is a pastime to which even 
the ministers should raise no objection. Like fenc- 
ing, this form of athletic sport tends to make a man 
quick of eye and physically alert, to give a man bet- 
ter "wind," and to qualify him to defend himself in 
the event of attack. Boxing, when engaged in un- 
der proper auspices, is as unobjectionable as almost 
any other form of sport. But boxing" and prize 
fighting;, as the latter is now conducted, are two 
different things. The council should enact and the 



mayor should sign the ordinance now in the hands 
of City Attorney Hewitt. 

* * * 

The numerous shocking railway accidents which 
have occurred in England during the past year, due 
to excessive speed at points where the rules require 
a reduction in speed, have caused a general demand 
for the equipment of all passenger locomotives with 
speed indicators. Experts declare that the greater 
proportion of these accidents would not have oc- 
curred if speed indicators had been before the eyes 
of the engineers. Indicators showing the air pres- 
sure in the brake reservoirs not only would help 
to explain accidents and to locate responsibility, but 
it is manifest that they would prove a constant 
check upon engineers who otherwise might rush 
their trains to destruction. While not half a dozen 
English locomotives are provided with efficient 
modern recording speed indicators, there are fully 
twenty thousand of them in use on the 
Speed continent, where their employment 

Indicators on all passenger locomotives is com- 
pulsory. In some countries every 
main freight line likewise is provided with them. 
On the continent speed indicators are considered as 
important as steam gauges on boilers and auto- 
matic brakes on trains. It is argued that an en- 
gineer would no more disregard the speed indicator 
than the steam gauge, and therefore as the' result of 
mental aberration only could an accident occur 
from neglect of the speed rules. It is plain that 
American railway operators have something to 
learn in this respect from Europe. If the conten- 
tions of the Southern Pacific officials are based upon 
facts, some of the recent tragedies on' the rail in 
this state might not have occurred if the locomo- 
tives drawing the wrecked trains had been equipped 
with appliances which would have indicated to the 
engineer that he was pushing his train at a danger- 
ous rate of speed. 

* * * 

The Dominion of Canada — poky, slow, conserva- 
tive, mossback Canada, as some of the ultra-patriot- 
ic Americans believe that country to be — does some 
things better than the United States does. For ex- 
ample, she has a finger constantly on the express 
companies transacting business' within her borders. 
All express companies in operation there are now 
subject to the jurisdiction of the board of railway 
commissioners of the Dominion, a body with powers 
something like those of our own Interstate Railway 

Commission. No company is per- 
Lesson from mitted to carry any goods by ex- 
Canada press until its rates shall have been 

submitted to and approved by the 
board. All rates, except joint rates of tolls between 
Canada and other countries, must be filed and ap- 






Pacific O u t I o o I: 



9 



prov> Maj [,1908. AH other rates wen 

ed July 1 of this year, unless the law was vio- 
lated. The best thing in connection with the work 
n is that the general govern- 
ment lias clothed that body with executive a> well 
dministrative powers. Unlike our own Inter- 
ommission, the Canada commis- 
sion may enforce the laws violations of which il 

* * * 
The Influence of Hearst 

The Hearst paper published in San Francisco has 
wantonly attacked Rudolph Spreckels and Francis 
I. llcney for their prosecution of the rich grafters. 
It declares that both men are dishonest and that 
unworthy motives are actuating- them. 

This attack is in line with the attitude assumed 
toward other men of note in America by this arrant 
demagogue. At various times the Hearst papers, 
chiefly the New York mouthpiece of the Hearst 
propaganda, have referred to more or less distin- 
guished American citizens in terms like these : 

Joseph H. Choate, the leader of the American 
bar — "A servile lickspittle of corporations." 

Edward M. Shepard, the foremost advocate of 
civic virtue in Democratic politics in New York 
city — ''Corporation lawyer." 

William Travers Jerome — "A political Croton 
bug." 

Timothv L. Woodruff, twice lieutenant-governor 
of Xew York — As standing "for everything rotten 
in Republican politics." 

Congressman Charles A. Townc — "A rat." 

Richard Watson Gilder, author and the leader of 
tenement house reform in New York — As having 
"ne' more manliness than an apple blossom." 

Thomas Taggart, chairman of the Democratic na- 
tional committee. — "A plague spot in the community 
spreading vileness." 

Secretary Bonaparte — "A cab-horse — a snob." 

George B. McClellan, mayor of New York — 
"Fraud mayor," "office thief." "dead cat in the citv 
hall." 

Alton B. Parker, who received the presidential 
nomination sought by Hearst — "A cockroach, a 
water-bug." 

John Hay — "A guy in a ruff and a red coat." 

Thomas B. Reed — To him he wrote in an open 
letter: "You divide McKinley's infamy with him 
and so make his load ca c ier. By the same token 
you have become a toad to the public eye ; you grow 
to be looked upon as a thing loathsome; your name 
becomes a hissing and a reproach, and your deeds 
a stench in the nostrils of men." 

1 .rover Cleveland — "No more, no less, than a liv- 
ing, breathing crime in breeches." 

Theodore Roosevelt — "A loose-tongued dema- 
gogue," "a woman-killer." "a flagrant tax-dodger," 
"a player to the colored gallery," "a man with the 
caste feeling." one who "has sold hjmself to the 
devil and will live up to the bargain." 

In his famous speech delivered at Utica, N. Y., 
November 1. 1906, Elihu Root quoted these ear- 
marks of Hearstian infamy and added: 

"Only once has this method of incendiary abuse 
wrought out its natural consequence — in the murder 
of President McKinley. For years, by vile epithet 
and viler cartoons, the readers of the Journal 



■ N ork paper 1 ■ ■ fhi to believi 

that McKinle\ was a monster in human form, 
whose taking off would he a service to mankind. 

Lei me quote some of these teachings: 

" 'M e K in K j condones the treacherous murder of 
our sailors at Havana and talks of his confidence in 
the honor of Spain. He plays the coward and 
shivers white-faced at the footfall of approaching 
war. lie makes an international cur of our country. 
lie is an abject, weak, futile, incompetent poltroon.' 

" 'McKinley. liar one girthy Princeton person, 
who came to be no more or less than a living, 
breathing crime in breeches, is therefore the most 
despised and hated creature in the hemisphere; his 
name is hooted ; his figure is burned in effi,gy.' 

' 'The bullet that pierced Goebel's chest 
Cannot be found in all the West ; 
Good reason, it is speeding here 
To stretch McKinley on his bier.' 

"'Institutions, like men, will last until they die; 
and if bad institutions and bad men can be got rid 
of only by killing, then the killing must be done.' 

' 'There has been much assassination in the 
world, from the assassination of some old rulers 
who needed assassination to the assassination of 
men in England, who, driven to steal by hunger, 
were caught and hanged most legally. 

" 'Is there any doubt that the assassination of 
Marat by Charlotte Corday changed history to some 
extent? What proof is there that France would 
have settled down into imperial Napoleonism and 
prosperity if Marat, the wonderful eye doctor, had 
been allowed to live to retain his absolute mastery 
of the Paris populace? 

" 'If Cromwell had not resolved to remove the 
head of Charles I from his lace collar, would Eng- 
land be what she is today — a really free nation and 
a genuine republic? 

" 'Did not the murder of Lincoln, uniting in sym- 
pathy and regret all good people in the North and 
South, hasten the era of American good feeling and 
perhaps prevent the renewal of fighting between 
brothers? 

" 'The murder of Caesar certainly changed the 
history of Europe, besides preventing that great 
man frorii ultimately displaying vanity as great as 
his ability. 

" 'When wise old sayings, such as that of Disraeli 
about assassination, are taken up. it is worth while, 
instead of swallowing them wdiole, to analyze them. 
We invite our readers to think over this question. 
The time devoted to it will not be wasted.' 

"What wonder that the weak and excitable brain 
of Czolgosz answered to such impulses as these ! 
He never knew McKinley; he had no real or fancied 
wrongs of his own to avenge against McKinley or 
McKinley's government: he was answering to the 
lesson he had learned, that it was a service to man- 
kind to rid the earth of a monster: and the foremost 
of the teachers of these lessons to him and his kind 
was and is William Randolph Hearst and his yellow 
journals. * * : ' 

"The same kind of teaching is being continued 
now month by month and day by day in the Hearst 
journals. Its legitimate consequence, if continued, 
must be. other weak dupes playing the role of Czol- 
gOSJ : other McKinleys stretched upon the bier: dis- 
cord and bloody strife in place of the reign of peace 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



and order throughout our fair land. It is not the 
spirit of Washington and of Lincoln ; it is the spirit 
of malice for all and charity towards none ; it is the 
spirit of anarchy, of communism, of Kishinef and 
of Bielostok." 

Hearst is in San Francisco, using his utmost 
efforts to prevent the graft prosecutors from putting 
the rich grafters in prison. Can it be possible that 
the influence of Hearst the anarchist, Hearst the 
assassination propagandist, will be of the slightest 
avail among men — real men? God forbid! 
* * * 
LANDSLIDE FOR FAIRBANKS 



until the police arrived. Jammes was taken to City 
Hall and recovered his senses after treatment. 



Nation-wide Enthusiasm for Indiana's 
Tallest Son 



From the New York Sun 

Boston, July 33. — Charles Warren Fairbanks of 
Indiana was elected to full membership in the An- 
cient and Honorable Artillery at a meeting in Fort 
Parker this morning. The cocktail consisting of 
one-half dry gin and one-half dry vermouth was 
named in his honor "The Fairbanks Favorite." 



Duluth, July 33. — The Bartenders' Benevolent 
and Fraternal Association 'this evening changed its 
name to the Fairbanks Legion and will support Mr.- 
Fairbanks for the Presidency. A design for a ban- 
ner, showing Mr. Fairbanks seated on a cloud and 
handing a cocktail to the world, was approved. 



'New Orleans, July 33. — Judge B. I. Bulous de- 
clared today that he was heart and stomach for 
Fairbanks for President. 



El Paso, Tex., July 33.^-The Anti-Temperance 
Union of El Paso county sent this congratulatory 
telegram to Vice-President Fairbanks this after- 
noon : "Thanks. We usually take ours straight, but 
we know Indiana whiskey and understand. You 
have our support and sympathy." 



Indianapolis, July 33. — The Hon. Charles Warren 
Fairbanks has been chosen chairman of the legisla- 
tive committee of the Saloon Keepers' League. 
This honor has never been conferred on a layman 
before. 



Drink Fairbanks Blend — The brand that made 
the Vice-President famous. — Adv. 



Philadelphia, July 33. — James Jammes narrowly 
escaped death to-day at the hands of a mob in front 
of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. Mr. Jammes has 
been a notorious total abstainer, and in the delirium 
of sobriety he screamed "Fairbanks drinks butter- 
milk !" Hardly had the words been uttered before 
a Fairbanks man who happened to be entering the 
hotel bar turned and denounced Jammes. A crowd 
collected and the unhappy Jammes, whose condition 
prevented him from recognizing his peril, repeated 
the slanderous charge. Immediately the cry 
• "Lynch him ! Lynch him !" was raised. Fortunate- 
ly there were many drunken men about and they 
succeeded in holding the infuriated citizens at bay 



Try Fairbanks Blend as a nightcap. — Adv. 



Portland, Me., July 33. — Vice-President Fair- 
banks has consented to make three speeches in this 
State against the Dow law in the next campaign. 

* * * 

The SidetracKers 

The motives of the graft prosecution have noth- 
ing to do with the question at stake, says the Sac- 
ramento Bee. The personality of Rudolph Spreckels 
is not one of the issues. The Bee prefers to 
believe that good intent is back of this prosecution 
— it is in possession of material evidence to that ef- 
fect. It would rather credit Rudolph Spreckels 
with acting from the heart and the conscience in 
this matter than at the instigation of the pocket- 
book — and it believes, from much it has gathered, 
that his motives are most worthy and commend- 
able. 

But, no matter what his motives, he is doing a 
great public work, and doing it splendidly. And 
every honest man and every honest newspaper in 
this state should be found helping him in this work, 
and none should be so lost to a decent sense of pri- 
vate and public honor as to do dirty work for the 
rich and influential master criminals by endeavor- 
ing to hamper and cripple him at every step of his 
good work. 

A Valuable Asset 

To discern the difference between the false and 
the true, to place the right values upon men, to em- 
phasize the right thing in them, to discriminate 
between the genuine and the pretended, is- an ac- 
complishment which may be worth infinitely more 
to you than a college education without this practi- 
cal power, and may make all the difference to you 
between success and failure, happiness and misery. 
— Success Magazine. 

* * * 

Taxation WltHout Representation 
When it is remembered that eighty-one per cent 
of the membership of the National Educational As- 
sociation is composed of women and that not one 
woman was given an office, the annual dues appear 
in the light of taxation without representation. 

* * * 

Early Frost Anticipated 

Charles Warren Fairbanks is coming to the coast! 
He wants his presidential bee-sting diagnosed — 
Wants an opinion on his chances, from his host; 
Wants the high-muckamucks to offer him a toast 
Over a banquet board at which no Banquo's ghost 
Or Manhattan cocktail tale will bring another roast 
From those who jeer at his ambitions for the post 
In thoughts of which the politicians are engrossed. 
Fairbanks is coming to the Espee-ridden coast; 
Get out your overcoats — there's sure to be a frost.* 
* Poetical license for this. 

* * * 

Easy Cryptogram 

Heney 

SprEckels 

BuRns 

CouRt 

Trial 

PrisoN 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



THE N. E. A. CONVENTION OF 1907 



By Wii.hf.i.misa ShBRRIFF I;,\i\ 



The ke> note struck by Dr. Schaeffer in his pn 
dential address was very fairly maintained during 
the sessions of the National Educational Associa- 
tion, and was splendidly reproduced in some of the 
ing orations. 

.Mrs. Grenfel of Denver dealt with the influence 
of wi rganizations upon public education. 

Forcefully and graphically she detailed sonic of the 
obstacles that women have surmounted since, in 
old Boston days, they were debarred from the ac- 
quirement of geographical knowledge because some 
one decreed: "Geography is a study as indelicate 
as it is useless so far as women are concerned." 

Step by step she traced the advancement of the 
awakening womanhood of this country toward 
gnition by and co-operation with men workers 
in the cause of humanity. Women's organizations 
within the United States now number 800,000 mem- 
bers, and to them are directly due the pure food 
laws, children's humane associations, and many 
other beneficial results. They have no Carnegie to 
erect and equip town libraries, but they have insti- 
tuted circulating libraries which transport carefully- 
assorted literature to the remotest hamlet of the 
swamps, the prairies, and the mountain slopes ; the 
judges of juvenile courts tell that all their efforts 
would be futile if unsupported by women ; and 
women are voters on education in eighteen of the 
twenty states that are computed to have least illit- 
eracy. 

Eloquently and powerfully Mrs. Grenfel spoke. 
and, as she quoted from Matthew Arnold : "When 
women organize themselves the world will be 
saved," it was manifest that she had stirred her 
vast audience to a fresh appreciation of that mo- 
mentous prophecy. 

The address placed last on the official programme 
of proceedings was a vindication of "common 
things" by Dr. Benjamin Ide Wheeler of the Uni- 
versity of California. With impassioned rhetoric 
the commonwealth was shown to have its proper 
foundation and preparation in the common schools ; 
while the grading within the schools was denounced 
as an attempt to classify the unclassifiable. "Pupils 
should be advanced on diligence and capacity — the 
old district school was better than the graded — you 
will shatter the grades!" declared the speaker. "Our 
democracy," he continued, "involves no proposition 
of equality save the equality of opportunity." 

Warmly as he protested against present-day ten- 
dencies to standardize the children of the common 
schools, he yet mure warmly animadverted on the 
growing inclination to provide special privileges for 
the children of wealth. "Heaven itself." it was 
reverently asserted, "has labored to prevent any 
such stratification in this land of ours. Give to 
every child the same chance of unfoldment: give to 
the unusually endowed child of the mansion or of 
the shack equal opportunity of development. It is 
the duty of the state not only to make good citizens, 
but to fit its people to live righteously, helpfully, 
happily !" 

Sometimes, indeed. Dr. Wheeler struck the note 
of tragedy, so deeply is he imbued with realization 
of the open and the hidden infelicities of life, and 



with the respi fusibilities of a national s) stem of edu- 
cation. His address was magnificent throughout, 
and must surely yield imperishable results. 

Exceedingly important topics were announced by 
tin department of physical training: yet the com- 
paratively tiny hall devoted to this section was not 
even half filled on either of its two occasions, and — 
stranger still — several advertised speakers failed to 
appear. Such facts are suggestive of an apathy 
that the Twentieth Century ought not to be charge- 
able with in any of its great educational institutions. 
Every day reveals to us new indications of inter- 
relation and correlation in all life's forces, and the 
teacher who ignores or belittles the association of 
mind in body cannot possibly render valuable ser- 
vice. 

Fortunately for those who did attend the sessions 
in the Fraternal Brotherhood building', a really ex- 
cellent address on "Physical Training as the Instru- 
ment for Making Theoretical Teaching of School 
Physiology of Practical Value for School Life," was 
delivered by Dr. Hastings, of the International Y. 
M. C. A. training school, Springfield, Mass. "The 
study of human structure," it was urged, "should be 
made the leading study of childhood ; not the physi- 
ology of the human body, but the physiology of the 
child concerned. Anthropometric examinations 
made twice a year gratify the interest in growth and 
development which is universal among boys and 
girls, they tend to stimulate physical self-cultiva- 
tion, and they guide the teacher in estimating vari- 
ations of capacity." 

Efforts in this direction have begun in Los An- 
geles. Dr. Leslie (child study department) stated 
that bodily examinations are now made in the cases 
of children relegated to ungraded rooms. Of those 
children seventy-five per cent are found to be defec- 
tive in health, while the ordinary ratio for American 
children ranges from twenty-five per cent to forty 
per cent. 

Such figures are sufficiently- alarming, and justify 
the claim that all children must be instructed and 
trained in bodily matters — scientifically instructed 
and trained — if nations are to escape gradual but 
sure decay. 

This claim is not widely urged, as yet. Effects 
are seen on every side — physical, mental and moral 
effects — but causes appear to be studied by com- 
paratively few thinkers. It may be wished that on 
future occasions the National Educational Associa- 
tion will allot more time and more prominence to 
the themes of health and degeneracy. 

Likewise it may be suggested that future con- 
ventions of tins great national organization should 
represent the work and the needs of the African sec- 
tion of the United States. Saving some rare refer- 
ence, the fiftieth anniversary meeting of the X. E. 
A. acted as if it were whollv unaware of the Ameri- 
can negro element. Yet that element constitutes 
one-tenth of the population of the country, and it is 
passing- through a transitional period which thrusts 
ever new problems upon itself and upon the remain- 
ing nine-tenths of the republic. If Booker Wash- 
ington, D11 Bois. and other grand leaders had rep- 
resented their race on the platform of the Xational 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



Education Association, a grander nationality would 
have been signified and a mightier influence would 
have gone forth unto the whole world. 

Curious to tell, the keenest interests of the con- 
vention appeared to be excited by the proposals for 
simplified spelling that it felt called to decide upon. 
Three hundred words — of which a large proportion 
have already installed themselves in popular usage 
— were considered affirmatively, then negatively, 
again affirmatively, and yet again negatively. Of 
course, mere common sense must finally prevail. 
The French language has become academically im- 
proved, the German language year by year responds 
to the amending touch of the imperial minister for 
public instruction, the English language — our noble 
heritage — will not long entrench itself in its one un- 
reasonableness. 

Considerable warmth was evinced in the art de- 
partment of the convention, but it was almost 
wholly the protective warmth of optimism. "Ameri- 
ca," one speaker stated, "presents a spectacle of 
glorious activity. Hitherto- its vast mind has ex- 
pressed itself in mechanics and invention ; it has not 
yet assumed its sovereignty in the realms of art. 
Even as Venice was imperatrix first of commerce 
and industry and ultimately of art, so will America 
advance more grandly yet unto her crowning 
glory !" 

Some interesting illustrations of municipal en- 
lightenment were furnished by various speakers ; 
Richmond, for example, makes an annual appropria- 
tion for the encouragement of art in its midst. The 
culmination of the topic was tersely expressed : 
"We want to extend the idea of aft to an apprecia- 
tion of beauty in every direction, to the enjoyment 
of nature, to the education of the people for their 
leisure." 

Not one speaker referred ever so distantly to that 
which under the name of art enters hundreds of 
thousands of homes every Sunday morning, and 
gives their first ideas of form, color and association 
to the little children of America. The little children 
and hosts of adult children welcome the comic 
pages of the Sunday newspapers as connoisseurs of 
the base, the vilely provocative ; while their sincere- 
ly sympathetic, intelligent and cultivated mentors 
in convention assembled raise no word of protest. 

Such aloofness from the affairs of common 
knowledge manifested itself again .and again during 
the sittings of the N. E. A. This is a matter of pro- 
found significance. It compels acknowledgement 
that our finest educational endeavors are only tenta- 
tive, that we have not yet attained to adequate con- 
ceptions of human need and human possibility. 
* * * * 

Turning, in the meantime, to brighter considera- 
tions, it is inspiring to know of the brilliant per- 
sonalities who are consecrated to the work of edu- 
cation — even as the work of education is today un- 
derstood. Men and women there are so noble, so 
gifted, that they cannot fail to elevate and to ex- 
pand all with whom they come in contact; men and 
women who have listened to the adjuration of Walt 
Whitman : 

And you, America! 

Cast you the real reckoning for your present, 

The lights and shadows of your future, good or evil? 

To girlhood, boyhood look, the teacher and the school. 

Such men and women have bestowed a benefit on 



Los Angeles merely by conferring here a benefit 
that may yet bloom out in many a fragrant deed. . 

And Los Angeles? Well has she acquitted her- 
self toward her guests. With the grace and the 
amplitude of her hospitalities, the fairyland illumin- 
ations of her streets, her excursions to mountain, 
beach, sister-town and fruity grove, her solemn and 
enchanting music, her flowers and her skies — with 
these and many other joys she has delighted herself 
in delighting unforgettable the 1907 convention of 
the National Education Association ! 



She Had the Last Word 

Mrs. Helen Grenfel — the Hon. Helen Grenfel — 
who was for three terms state superintendent of 
public instruction in Colorado, is one of the most 
modest of women, although she has all the gifts 
that usually cause self appreciation. She is a hand- 
some, well-poised woman of commanding intellect. 
Her address at the recent N. E. A. convention was 
one of the star features of the meeting. By some 
curious lack of thoughtfulness, it was placed at the 
end of a long programme and it was ten o'clock be- 
fore the brilliant speaker had a chance to be heard. 
Mrs. Grenfel prefaced her address by the remark 
that it is not often a woman is permitted to have 
the last word. She held what was left of the au- 
dience, although at least a third of the seats in the 
Auditorium had been vacated. The incident is to 
be regretted, for Mrs. Grenfel is a woman to whom 
the highest honors and the most distinguished con- 
sideration are due. She had something to say and 
what she said will be long remembered. 



"Educand" Didn't Pass Muster 

Professor John Adams of University College, 
London, came all the way across the ocean to tell 
the N. E. A. that the English language needs a new 
word, which he himself has coined. The new word 
is "educand." The subject of Professor Adams's 
address was "A Significant Lack of Educational 
Terminology." Quite frankly the British scholar 
announced that his mission was "to try to do what 
a Roman emperor tried to do and failed to do" — to 
make the people use a new word. "Pupil" had been 
overworked as a word describing a person being 
educated, an "educatee" in fact. "Educand," he de- 
clared, was needed, not to supplant "pupil" but to 
express a different shade of meaning. 

The effect produced by the learned man's rather 
startling plea for his new word, brought over seas 
in his brain and his steamer trunk, is perhaps best 
indicated by the remark of a professor at Occidental 
College who said: 

"Professor Adams just missed supplying a long 
felt want. If he had offered us 'edu-can't' for 'edu- 
cand' we would have accepted it as a proper desig- 
nation for the students who fail. In my experience 
I have encountered a number of educan'ts, but I am 
glad to say they have been few indeed — especially 
in Southern California." 

There is no reason to deplore the fact that Pro- 
fessor Adams was a disappointment. He should 
have learned something from the philosophy of his- 
tory I he should not have attempted to do more than 
the unsuccessful Roman emperor. He chose to ride 
his little hobby horse across the Atlantic and to 
canter it upon the Auditorium stage, but "educand" 
failed to win more than good natured attention. No 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



one will bet a dogeared primer on the hobb) or 
cheer the learned visitor who proudly believes that 
a clay will come when the United Slates will b 
of the pi army of public school 

"educands." 

Hints to Professor John Adams, who lias invent- 
ed the noun "educand" to supply a "significant lack 
ducational terminology." List of words to be 
used by our public 

Economicand — One who receives a teacher's 
salary. 

Martyrcand — Teacher who is too much bossed 
by a principal. 

Madicand — Educand who receives order to stay 
after school. 

Bullycand — Boy who is licked by another boy. 

Coricand — Child who has privilege of finishing 
another child's apple. 

Spankicand — One who is punished in an old fash- 
ioned manner. 

Scoldicand — One wdio is rebuked by a cross 
teacher. 

Grimacicand — Teacher at whom a disrespectful 
educand makes faces. 

Arithmeticand — Educand who is instructed in 
the multiplication table. 

Geographicand — Educand who is compelled to 
learn facts about his own state map. 

* * * 

Women on 'Chang'e 

When the Woman's Mining and Stock Exchange 
opened its doors last Monday the public showed 
more or less curiosity concerning a novel venture 
and the daily call at n a. m., has drawn crowds 
composed largely of men. If any one has an idea 
that a Woman's Mining and Stock Exchange is not 
needed in Los Angeles, let him interview the presi- 
dent, Mrs-. Clara Shortridge Foltz, whose name has 
been before the public for many years. Mrs. Foltz 
believes that in a city where so many women have 
made fortunes in business an organization which 
enables those interested in mining to work together 
cannot fail to meet with success. Twenty-eight 
members have bought seats on 'change and it is ex- 
pected that this number will be doubled within ten 
days. 

The room occupied by the exchange shows the 
best taste in its furnishings, which are in the mis 7 
sion style, the draperies being of green silk rep. A 
soft carpet covers the floor and an artistically 
framed blackboard announces the names and prices 
of the listed stocks. Naturally, the outsider will be 
more or less puzzled by the trades, but it is evident 
that the dull season is not to be permitted to have 
a depressing effect upon the speculative spirit of the 
women brokers. 

Mrs. Foltz has been practicing law, with offices 
in the Trust Building, since she came from San 
Francisco immediately after the earthquake. This 
new venture will not in any way interfere with her 
professional activities. She had the honor of being 
the first woman admitted to the bar on the Pacific 
coast ami was the first woman to serve as trustee 
of the State Normal School of California. She 
gained national notice by her famous fight for 
"Public Defenders," when she succeeded in having 
introduced into legislatures of thirty-two states a 
bill which she drafted. She has gained a reputation 



The L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



"Writing in Sight) 




Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue Free 

L. CEL M. Alexander CEL Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 

131 SovitW Broadway. Los Angeles, Ceil. 
Phones Home 1906 -Main 5959 




BETWEEN 

.. California** East.. 

Hi 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 

'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at 601 South Spring St. 




Arizona Turquoise Mines Co. 

CAN SHOW YOU THE LARGEST 
VARIETY OF COLORING IN TUR- 
QUOISE—THE ONLY STONE THAT 
IS HARD ENOUGH TO WEAR. 

Cutting; Worhs and Sales Room 

450}= SOUTH BROADWAY 

Wholesale and Retail 



Books Bought 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1855 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



as an orator and spoke in the campaign of 1900 un- 
der the auspices of the National Republican com- 
mittee. Associated with her as secretary and treas- 
u er of the Woman's Stock Exchange is Mrs. Anna 
L. Briggs, who has been successful in real estate 
ventures. Mrs. Hattie B. McKenzie is field man- 
ager. With some surprise it is noticed that the 
general manager is a mere man. - Why the chief re- 
sponsibility of this experiment should be intrusted 
to a man is hard to understand when the personnel 
of the exchange is considered. Is it possible that a 



concession is made to prejudice, or is there an ad- 
mitted limit to woman's capacity in commercial en- 
terprise ? Of course the one man is especially fitted 
to occupy a position that must require the wisdom 
of a Solomon. Earl D. Gray, long associated with 
mining enterprises, has accepted the strenuous du- 
ties of management. Mr. Gray is a handsome, suave 
man who must possess the characteristics of a dip- 
lomat. The progress of the Woman's Mining and 
Stock ' Exchange will be watched with interest. 
Every one will wish success to its founders. 



BIRTHDAY OF LOS ANGELES 




Church of Our Lady of Angels, Where the Celebration will be Held 



Like a page from the past the programme for 
the celebration, August 2, of the 126th anniversary 
of the founding of Los Angeles will teach a lesson 
of pioneer courage. Since the historic date marks 
also the beginning of the Church of Our Lady of 
Angels it is fitting that the annual celebration 
should be in charge of the Society, la Reina de Los 
Angeles, organized five years ago by Father Juan 
Caballeria, of the Plaza Church. General Jose 
Aguilar, who fought with the Mexican army in its 
stand against the Americans, will fire the cannon 
salutes at sunrise. The aged soldier, now a cen- 
tenarian, will wear his old Mexican uniform and 
as the cannon booms the flags of the three coun- 
tries, Spain, Mexico and the United States, under 
which Los Angeles has flourished, will be raised. 
Father Caballeria will celebrate solemn high mass 
at 10 o'clock and in the afternoon the children of 
the parish will enjoy a festival in the patio back of 
the rectory. A Spanish-American concert will be 
given in the evening. 

Interest in the celebration revives memories of 
the various Spanish residents who have served the 
city and the state with honor. On the front page of 
the Pacific Outlook this week is a portrait of Don 
Francisco Garcia, for many years aide to Governor 
Pico. Don Francisco Garcia made many trips on 
horseback from Los Angeles to the City of Mexico 
and no one knew every inch of ground in Southern 
California better than he. He lived to the great age 
of one hundred and fifteen. The photograph re- 
produced in this issue was taken three years before 



the death of the famous old man, whose descend- 
ants are among the most substantial citizens of Los 
Angeles. 




Father Juan Caballeria 



Pacific Outlook 



TUBERCULOSIS AMONG THE POOR 

The Tragedy in the RanKs of Indigent Sufferers in Southern California 

By Frances Rbid Ferris, R. n.,J. H. H. 



i Com h 



In the past five weeks I have never given less 
than ciixht hours daily to the work and frequentlj 
more, two Sunday afternoons. The Sundaj 

work \\a# necessary, as parties concerned could not 
be seen at any other time. They wen- laborers em- 
ployed in road-making outside of the city limits, re- 
turning to their homes on Saturday nights only for 
a week-end stay. The pleasant co-operation of 
these men was necessary for the hygienic better- 
ment of their homes and families. Since the women 
of the household feared to tell them there was no 
other way hut for me to explain matters to them 
in propria persona. Results of the interviews were 
satisfactory and are proving more so, so that I feel 
i he extra effort was well worth while. Had the is- 
suc been less favorable my estimate would still be 
•ratification in the performance of a seeming duty. 
' To my first list of sixty-six, twenty more have 
been added from the Helping Station and five from 
the city health department, making a total of 91. 
Those 'reached were 45: not reached, 14; died, 5; 
left Los Angeles, 10; addresses given not found in 
city map, in directory nor guide, 8; visits attempted, 
patients not at home, 9. 

It would be impossible for me to make an exact 
statement of the number of visits made during these 
last five weeks. I have not only been investigator, 
relief visitor, cooking teacher, instructor of hygiene, 
sanitary inspector, trained nurse, but adviser, cor- 
respondent and helper in almost every conceivable 
capacity — personal, domestic, scientific, law, reli- 
gious, besides consulting physicians and — acting as 
peacemaker. In fulfilling these varied demands I 
have acted in accordance with my conviction that 
every situation pointing to the welfare of the patient 
should be relieved adequately from vortex to outer 
circumference, and even including backward rota- 
lion, if thereby I can promote the hygienic and 
sanitary environment of the poor tuberculous. 

I have made as many as fourteen visits in one day, 
sometimes ten and twelve; more often eight, and 
several times I covered only five and six visits in 
the eight hours. 

Estimating that seventy per cent of our death 
rate caused by tuberculosis is imported, and that by 
averaging up the mean rate of these consumptives 
who come and get well with our local death rate the 
results show we have not a much larger amount of 
tuberculosis to deal with in Los Angeles than in any 
other city of the same size, our problem is not dis- 
couraging. The situation in our city is one of mag- 
nitude and importance, however, and must in the 
main rest in the municipality for adjustment. The 
department of health is doing what it can to better 
conditions, but so long as the municipality com- 
placently remembers only those who are saved from 
death by tuberculosis and forgets the hundreds who 
die yearly in our city from a preventable disease, 
and avoids recognizing conditions as they really 
arc. the health department will not be a very power- 



iul force in treating those social causes which foster 

tuberculosis in Los Angeles'. 

Is ward Xo. 10 in the county hospital an agent for 
prevention in fighting this disease of the indigent? 
lias it ever effected a cure? Can you blame the 
poor fellow u ho lias tuberculosis in its first stage 
because he does not want to go to a hospital where 
iie must constantly see men with the stamp of death 
upon them? In addition to what he really sees in 
such a place he imagines much more. Every one 
who has tried it knows how hard it is to persuade 
even the poorest consumptive to enter our county 
hospital and with what discouraging frequency he 
dies or leaves after the briefest of stays. It is diffi- 
cult for any hospital receiving tuberculosis patients, 
no matter how well it may do its work, to prevent 
the advanced cases from giving a tone to the in- 
stitution harmful to patients in the earlier stages 
of the disease. The poor man, no more than the 
rich, cares to be reminded of what may come to be 
his own lot. Years of neglect and failure to recog- 
nize the tuberculosis danger furnish to our munici- 
pality an object lesson in what exists and what must 
be done to alleviate the encumbered situation. 

Realizing the urgent need, I hope the Southern 
California League for the Prevention of Tubercu- 
losis will no longer delay in formulating and work- 
ing out a comprehensive and efficient system for a 
successful campaign to fight tuberculosis. The field 
must be entered with spirit, unremittingly occupied, 
and a connected series of preventive operations con- 
ducted with vigilance. 

A committee composed of heads of municipal de- 
partments, representative physicians who have 
made a special study of tuberculosis, an executive 
head of a university or college, a representative of 
the public schools, one or two prominent divines, 
and men and women having a wide experience in 
the intricate problems of relief, would give the vari- 
ous groupings necessary to accomplish a mobiliza- 
tion of social forces which would be a potential fac- 
tor in the prevention of tuberculosis. Such a com- 
mittee could properly voice the needs of the com- 
munity for suitable provision for the treatment of 
tuberculosis and use its influence towards the 
maintenance of an adequate Helping Station with a 
diet kitchen for the relief of indigent cases. 

Pamphlets dealing with tuberculosis and its treat- 
ment should be published in at least four editions — 
Spanish, English, German and Russian. The press 
could be of great assistance in bringing these pub- 
lications to the notice of the public, while the dif- 
ferent civic organizations might be enlisted to dis- 
tribute them through certain localities. Tubercu- 
losis will not be prevented until the public has 
learned the few elementary facts which the league 
through its publications should undertake to teach. 

A course of free evening lectures to the people. 
should be established for popular education. Many 
physicians, as well as others, would generously of- 
fer their services in delivering them ; while schools. 



1G 



Pacific Outlook 



churches, trade unions and clerks would help in se- 
curing audiences and providing hails. 

In view of the important bearing tuberculosis has 
upon labor, organized labor must be brought into 
the work. Every labor union should have its own 
committee on sanitation, which would co-operate 
with the league committee for the prevention of 
tuberculosis. 

A Southern California Tuberculosis Exhibition 
would give definite expression of needs and condi- 
tions, as well as the trend and object of the move-, 
m.ent for prevention. Such an exhibition would 
serve a useful purpose in the East as well as in the 
West. 

Another one' of my problems has been the em- 
ployment of consumptives able , to do a certain 
amount of work. I have on my. list a number of 
such cases where existence without work is preca- 
rious and uncertain. To put them in positions 
where they would have to work beyond their 




Frances Reid Ferris, R. N., J. H. H. 

Photo by Mojonier 

strength would be to destroy all results gahied, and 
yet they are strong enough to do some sort of la- 
bor, and must, in order to be independent of the 
charitable organizations. 

The city has an ordinance forbidding the tuber- 
culous to sell fruit, vegetables or, meat. This closes 
an avenue of support to many "improved" cases. 
Light work in the country appeals to many as an 
excellent solution of the question. My experience 
in this respect prompts me always to advise against 
such patients going to the country to shift for them- 
selves. Few of these men are suited to a ranch life 
without medical supervision, and farmers do not 
want men who cannot do a hard day's -work. I 
know of one just at present who is doing very well 
indeed in the country, but he reports each week 
either to me or the Helping Station, as he cannot 
afford a doctor just yet. Of course the ideal solu- 



tion of this problem would be a municipal sana- 
torium with a farm school in connection, and, in- 
deed, 'I think right here of several forms of employ- 
ment for consumptives so situated that might be 
done under espionage. 

The refusal of neighborhoods in city and country 
to have the tuberculous thrust upon them is evi- 
dence of most culpable ignorance. Indifference, 
apathy, ignorance, suspicion and dread are some of 
the obstacles to be conquered. Extreme measures 
may not be taken, therefore, at any one time, but 
gradually, step by step, until immediate concern 
and lively interest replace the unreasoning fear of 
an unknown peril. People hear that tuberculosis 
is communicable — they call it contagious and con- 
fuse it with diphtheria, scarlet fever, cholera and 
smallpox. Landlords, employers and fellow-em- 
ployes look with suspicion upon the poor fellow 
with consumption, so that I frequently encounter a 
fear of contagion so overpowering that the value of 
prevention is lost sight of. Lengthy interviews and 
extended explanation are often necessary to over- 
come this fear and win confidence. I am convinced 
there are many cases of tuberculosis in our city un- 
recorded and unknown. 

In seeking information many obstacles present 
themselves. Kindly interest and patience usually 
result in the non-communicative beginning to talk 
more freely, even to the point of being confidential. 
Because of this tendency to secrecy the earlier 
symptoms of the disease are often entirely ignored 
Insurance companies and doctors are largely re- 
sponsible for some of the concealment regarding 
the true condition of patients with prolonged 
coughs. Some companies refuse to insure persons 
whom they suspect of suceptibility to consumption, 
while others for the same reason require them to 
pay higher premiums and then deduct a portion of 
the policy when the insured die of tuberculosis. 
Some physicians knowing this fact and out of con- 
sideration for the patient's family will give the 
cause of death as pleural pneumonia. A conversa- 
tion with an undertaker revealed these facts. If 
his statement be true it would be better if some 
other method were devised whereby the family 
could secure the money. Under the present mode 
no fumigation or cleaning of the rooms occupied by 
the deceased takes place, and the family is not in- 
structed regarding the prevention of tuberculosis. 
From the ranks of the lodging-house population 
are recruited a large number of the well-advanced 
cases of tuberculosis. Constant contact with that 
class of sufferer strengthens my impression that the 
occupants of these houses should be subjected to 
effective surveilance. I am not informed on the 
licensed capacity of lodging houses in Los Angeles. 
I only know that many of them present in some 
phases the very worst elements of our population 
and for their protection some method should be 
promptly adopted that would at least shield other 
citizens against them. It is impossible to watch 
over this shifting, irresponsible class, and the 
remedy would be in exercising the greatest possible 
care over the erection and maintenance of these 
dwellings. Ventilation, water-closets, baths, floors, 
beds, back yards, alleys, roofs and cuspidors present 
an array of subjects which should be regulated by 
an efficient sanitary code. 

In staying the scourge of any epidemic we center 
responsibility upon the medical profession, but we . 



Pacific Outlook 



l< 



•no ri^hi it there unless we meet Ihe 

conditions which authoritative medical opinion <le- 

sential. ( >ur physicians have pointed 

■ nit the necessity for proper hospitals and sanab 

municipal or state am, for the hyg 

earc of the poor consumptive, and we cannot ex- 
them any more than any Other class of citi- 
secure their establishment. This must be 

■ lone by the state, municipality or private philan- 
thropy. If the municipality will only make the ap- 
propriations and pay the taxes then, justly, might 
lite community regard the medical profession re- 
sponsible for 

In the meantime the work of the moment seems 

to be for the Southern California League for the 

en t ion of Tuberculosis to initiate a system of 

public and private control of tuberculosis and adopt 

a policy that will keep the work of the municipality 

- the highest standard of effectiveness. 

We have some housing conditions in Los Angeles 
that are a disgrace to any intelligent community. 
[ have several families with tuberculous members 
who sleep with the well. One family of nine live 
in two rooms and one of the children, a little girl of 
twelve years afflicted with pulmonary tuberculosis, 
sleep? with three of her sisters. Another family of 
five, the mother with pulmonary tuberculosis, all 
sleep in one room. In this family is a father and a 
hoy of fourteen years. We have no ordinance to 
control the situation, therefore nothing can be done. 
These instances are sad examples of the physical 
and moral evils arising from overcrowding. Such 
places cannot be kept wholesome — their occupants 
cannot be kept clean. 

Los Angeles has a population of nearly 300,000. 
It has miles and miles of graded streets, cement side- 
walks, an internal sewer system, and soon will have 
an outfall sewer to the ocean. It has beautiful 
buildings, a court house, its city hall and Chamber 
of Commerce. It has good theatres, a splendid 
auditorium, fine churches, charming homes within 
spacious lawns, a really magnificent street railroad 
system, the best public school system in the state, 
a state normal chool, Univerity of Southern Cali- 
fornia, its College of Medicine, Occidental College, 
its public library, its medical library just given to 
the city by Dr. Barlow, its benevolent associations, 
social, political, literary and art clubs, its Asso- 
ciated Charities, Salvation Army, church auxiliaries, 
fraternal societies with their numerous branches, 
and that inspirational worker, the Rev. Dana W. 
Bartlett, who has established and gives his whole 
time to the Bethlehem Institutions located in the 
famous eighth ward, and its several branches in 
other parts of the city and suburbs. 

With this magnificent showing- of learning, cul- 
ture, wealth, prosperity and love of man for his 
brother, surely must some public spirited capitalists 
'"me forward and co-operate for improving the 
conditions of the poor and indigent consumptive. 
The world occasionally acknowledges good work 
done, and whether it does or not, our moral duty to 
the poor consumptive in our midst, and to the com- 
munity in this respect, is a very real one and not to 
he overlooked. "Men co-operate with each other 
for the sustenance of all." It is obligatory that we 
.11.1 our fellowmen — in no way can we better do it 
than by preventing unnecessary sickness and death. 

Netting in my work has pained me more than 








Fine Floors 








^O^HH^^HB 


For 




.' 


Fine Houses 




■ V\\ v -.. 


We put down all kino's 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 




^H^Hw^H^^^^^^H^^^H 


Co-Operatrve 
Hardwood Floor Co. 


Home 4297: Main 5193 


21S Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach Both 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



PIER.CE ®. CO. 



KODAK FINISHING 

.GO TO... 

12? W. 6th St, 



MONEY 



Diamonds Bought, and Sold 

It you Have any kind of collateral that you wish to raise money 
on, call at 316 S. BROADWAY. Phone 4322 

MARKWELL & CO. 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



the aversion with which consumptives are treated. - 
No class of afflicted need more the broad personal 
touch of personal kindness and encouragement — he 
needs it in full and plentiful measure, pressed down 
and running over. On this subject, Dr. Francis M. 
Pottenger, founder of the Southern California 
League for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, says : 

"The tuberculous patient is a hurrfan being. The 
tuberculous patient is our brother, our sister, our 
mother, our wife, our father. We must remember 
that they are human beings, and we must treat 
them in that way. I have seen this disease. It has 
been in my family. I see it every day in other fami- 
lies, and I want to say that there is no place where 
tuberculosis is treated properly, that is, in a sanato- 
rium, where the physicians and nurses and all the 
attendants are associating with tuberculous patients 
from morning until night, day after day, year after 
year. There is not a single record of anybody in any 
properly managed institution of that kind where 
there has been a single case of infection." 

* * * 
Noted AxitHor and Traveler 

Mrs. Margaret Gary Wright, author and traveler, 
has returned to Los Angeles after an absence of 
several months, in which she has been busily en- 




Mrs. Margaret Gary Wright 

Writer and traveler who hate returned to Los Angeles to 

pass the summer. 

gaged in gathering data for her forthcoming book, 
"Indian Legend and Lore." Mrs. Wright is na- 
tional vice-president of the League of American 
Penwoman and she is also a member of the South- 
ern California Women's Press Club. In addition 
to her literary work she has innumerable interests 
and is one of the busiest women in the West. She 
has long been connected with the Women's Relief 
Corps and will go to Saratoga Springs as a dele- 
gate to the national convention which meets Sep- 
tember 9. She serves as assistant national press 
correspondent for this organization. As state com- 
mander of Arizona and New Mexico for the Ladies 
of the Maccabees Mrs. Wright passes much of her 
time in the two territories. On her last trip she had 
the privilege of photographing the ancient olla re- 
cently exhumed from the Casa Grande ruins. This 
olla, which is seven and a half feet in circumference, 
holds a barrel and a half of water. The ruins have 



PONY RIGS 



A SPECIALTY 
WITH US 




STUDEBARER AGENCY 

WAGONS CARRIAGES IMPLEMENTS 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 

200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, Cal. 



PHONE HOME A 4432 

4TH ST. STORE 



F 7671 ; MAIN 4604 
Spring ST. Store 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST. 



BULUNG'S METHOD OF MUNICH (or the treatment of diseases of the 
air passages-CATARRH, BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our Inhalatorium should be made bj all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send for booklet 

Phone F-1467 



409 Pacific Electric Bldg'. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



' 'Largest and Finest Stock of Furniture in the JVesC ' 

( ^EDITABLE CARPETS... 

A \ Our stock is all new, just from the foremost factories, and com- 
• f prises the best in every line. With the able assistance of our 
experienced carpet men you will have little trouble selecting 
carpets, rugs, etc., that will be best suited to your needs and prove most 
satisfactory. Choose your floor covering from our immense stock at 
our large new store on Hill Street. 

640-646 SOUTH MILL ST. " 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



- ntensely patriotic wom- 
an, who declares that her chief ambition now is to 

an American flag waving constantly over the 
broken ad - built by the Indians of long 

Among Mrs. Wright's literary achievements as an 
author is a description of the steeple of Christ 

rch, London. This has been recognized as an 
important contribution to Lincoln Literature. The 

pie, which was erected as a memorial to Abra- 
ham Lincoln, has the stars and stripes worked into 
its .ice. ■rati. 'lis. 

* * * 

Mystery of tHe "Come-on" Man 

When Collier's published a brief, witty, and. in 
places, painfully truthful analysis of certain charac- 
teristics of Los Angeles as a prize winning con- 
trihution in its "Our Town" competition there was 
more or less indignation among residents who make 
a feature of their public spirit. The city directory 
was searched for the name of the author, but no 
Lester Roberts was to be found. One or two news- 
papers made scathing remarks about the unjust 
"roast." In nine days, Lester Roberts was for- 
gotten, but for a month his clever characterization 
i >f Los Angeles as the "Come-on" town has been 
frequently repeated in drawing rooms and clubs un- 
til it has reached the street car conductors and the 
spielers on the do-the-city-in-two-hours automo- 
biles. The clipping from Collier's is hidden in 
many a man's breast pocket memorandum book and 
whenever it is noticed it causes a smile. 

Lester Roberts divided the inhabitants of Los 
Angeles into five groups, "each working independ- 
ently, yet all for the common boost," as follows: 

Group A — Consists of the Realty Board, Chamber 
of Commerce and Railroads and are known as the 
Come-on Agents. 

Group B — The Real Estate Men, or home finders, 
numbering some two hundred thousand. 

Group C — The Spiritual Shepherds, ministers, 
swamis, mahatmas, apostles, healers and clairvoy- 
ants, about twenty thousand. 

Group D — The Culturines. consisting of' china 
painters, burnt leatherers, miniature painters, and 
painters of miniatures, about twenty thousand. 

Group E — Myself, the undertaker. 

Group A and Group D received the most atten- 
tion from Lester Roberts who said: 

"Group A pull off the fiestas, bull and prize fights, 
and employ the big fish at Catalina. Thev aiso mail 
Ions of 'Sec California First' literature, and print 
postals for the rest of us to mail 'to the old home' 
depicting us husking oranges at Christmastime or 
sitting 'neath the shade of the sheltering palm read- 
ing about a Boston blizzard. 

"Group D — Here you have at your beck and call 
the greatest army of artists that ever survived a 
brainstorm — the china painters. They are ex- 
quisitely feminine and do wonderful pin poinsettias 
on Jardinieres. The) are ably seconded by the 
Burnt Leather Brigade, which singes the missions 
on skins of poor, kind-faced calves. Then there are 
nearly 2,000 of the clam shell school of jewelers." 

Now that the first sting of proper indignation has 
been relieved by the balm of time — a month has 
passed since the article appeared — the storv of how 
the description of the "Come-on" city happened to 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at. Reduced 
Kates .... 

140 S. BROADWAY 

Main 1 9 Get. a City Map Free Home Ex. 1 9 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



INCUBATORS AND BROODERS 

Poultry Supplies, Seeds, Garden Tools, Lawn Mowers, Etc. 
Pacific IncubaLor Co. 



707 South Spring St,. Ph°n«s !f7085 63 ' 




When you read in the PACIFIC 
OUTLOOK the advertisement of 
some merchant, just remember thai 
Mr. Merchant has paid well for the 
space to convince you that his 
goods are the best. 

If by persistent advertising the 
merchant is successful in gaining 
your confidence and in interesting 
you in his store and in the goods 
he sells, and if you find you want 
or need the goods he advertises 
and decide to buy. it is your duty 
to buy of him. 

The element of truth, the con- 
viction in the merchant's adver- 
tisement, must have convinced you 
that the poods he advertises are 
suited to your needs. 

BUY ADVERTiSED GOODS 
BUY OF THE ADVERTISER 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



be written will interest even the real estate men 
and the undertakers. 

(First, it must be known that the pestiferous Les- 
ter Roberts does not exist except on the page of 
Collier's. Rob Wagner, the portrait painter of 
Santa Barbara, is the author of the "Our Town" 
article. Mr. Wagner has won wide recognition by 
pictures that are extraordinary in their splendid 
drawing, their beautiful color harmonies and their 
intensely human quality. Naturally, he makes fre- 
quent visits to Los Angeles, where he is cordially 
welcomed, for he is an all-around good fellow. 
Early in the spring he passed several weeks in the 
metropolis of Southern California and when he re- 
turned to Santa Barbara, he though he noticed that 
his literary friends, Stewart Edward W;hite and 
Samuel Hopkins Adams, were less inclined than 
formerly to listen to his kindly criticisms of their 
work. Inasmuch as Mr. Wagner had met all the 
writers of Los Angeles; .he felt that, he was pre- 
pared to point out faults and he showed such an in- 
clination to insist on the difference between literary 
tweedle-dee and literary tweedle-dum that Mr. 
White one day hinted that a painter ought to stick 
to his palette. 

"I'll write something just to show you whether I 
know anything about your trade," threatened Mr. 
Wagner. 

The two authors laughed tauntingly. 

"I'll take a Collier prize," the artist announced. 

Mr. Adams, who is on Collier's staff, looked su- 
perior and then added three "Ha-has." 

The first foggy day when it was not possible to 
paint Mr. Wagner carried out his threat. He wrote 
something. Several weeks later Mr. Adams re- 
ceived a proof accompanied by a letter from the 
editor of Collier's asking if he would not look up 
Lester Roberts, as there might be an interesting 
piece of copy in an interview with the humorist. 
Mr. Adams made diligent inquiry but he failed to 
find any one who had ever heard of a California 
writer named RobeVts. He consulted Mr. Wagner, 
who reminded him that a painter could not be ex- 
pected to know anything about literary men or their 
work. So Mr. Adams missed his assignment. 

Another fortnight passed and then as the three 
friends were returning from the Santa Barbara 
postoffice Mr. White and Mr. Adams again were 
supercilious when Mr. Wagner commented on a 
book. 

"I am qualified as a literary critic," the artist 
declared. "As proof of what I say, here is a written 
guarantee." 

From a letter he took out a slip of paper, which 
he flaunted before the eyes of the authors. 

It was a check from Collier's for the prize money 
for the "Come-on" article. 

Since then Mr. White and Mr. Adams meekly 
have listened to Mr. Wagner's most severe com- 
ments on their book and they have not dared to ut- 
ter an opinion on one of Mr. Wagner's portraits. 

"When you authors have painted pictures that 
take prizes in the Paris salon, you will be qualified 
to criticize my portraits," the artist asserted the 
day he cashed his check. 

Then he invited his friends to have ice cream 
sandwiches with him before he obeyed a "come-on" 
invitation to spend his prize money in Los Angeles. 



By Mary Elizabeth Parsons and Margaret 
Warriner Buck. 

THE WILD FLOWERS 

OF CALIFORNIA 

NEW EDITION— JUST OUT. 
The final authority on every known wild flower 
of the State. Entire new edition, made necessary 
through the loss of the original plates in the San 
Francisco disaster. A number of new flowers have 
been added and the nomenclature brought up to 
date. Price $2 net. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 
The Big Book Store 252 S. Spring St,. 



Summer Prices 

IN 

Table 
Silverware 



We need the room. for our fall stock and offer both' 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 


















"We 


are 


P 


ractica 








— Don't Buy Until Yo\i 


See 


Us 



BRIGDEN * ND PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 



r 



Established 1887 



iJK. 



onradi 



Elegant new stoch of Diamonds, 
Jewelry and Watches 



Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C. H. Heard 

S. CONRADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles, Cal. 




V isitors are Cordially Invite d 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER... 



ARTS AND 

MRS. 
Hand Painted China 
Hammered Metals 
Burnt and Modeled Leather 


CRAFTS SHOP 

C. D. "WESTON 

Home Phone B 334-5 

347 S. Broadway 



Pacific Outlook 



81 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



A Painter cf the Sea 

After a year marked by an extraordinary number 
hi picture exhibitions, an artist who can awaken 
genuine enthusiasm musl have something more than 
average t&lent. [I an exaggeration to saj 

that John A. Donovan'.-- twenty-two marines have 
awakened greater interest than any paintings since 
Jules Pages were seen. This is said with 
the remembrance that Granville Redmond's work 
was shown this month in the gallery at No. 336^ 
South Broadway where Mr. 1 lonovan's pictures now 
hang. In some way-; Mr. Redmond disappointed 
the public, for it has come to expect great things of 
him and several pictures lacked the power of con- 
vincing all who looked at them that they had been 
painted out of doors. Master of a superb technique 
and possessed of a strong individuality, Mr. Red- 
mond can never be commonplace, but he can be 
more sincere than he has been in his latest work. 
Bui though Mr. Redmond was not always at 
his best, it is a severe test, even to the successful 
artist, to compare his work with that of this really 
big man, and by force of circumstances Mr. Dono- 
van does challenge comparison merely because his 
pictures were placed this week where Mr. Red- 
mond's hung last week. 

Plainly Mr. Donovan has gone out on the water 
to paint his pictures, all of which present glimpses 
of the vast ocean as it rises and falls beneath the 
dome of heaven. He has painted with the freedom 
and strength that belong to the artist who has never 
lost consciousness of the fact that he must perfect 
his technique merely because it affords him facility 
of expression. A first glimpse of the pictures causes 
one to forget everything except the sea ; and when 
the thrall of the sea has been felt, it seems almost 
an indignity to remember that the artist has pro- 
duced his impression through the medium of pig- 
ments. 

No one can look upon "The Cloud Bank'' without 
coming under the magic of this lover of the sea — 
for surely Mr. Donovan could not produce his pic- 
tures without paying to the ocean the tribute of a 
sincere love for its changing glory and majesty. On 
the horizon line there is a wall of clouds out ot 
which a distant ship is sailing. In the foreground 
and middle distance is the sea, moving with the 
might of a mysterious power. Here are vast deeps 
reflecting surface lights and revealing the trans- 
parency of the water wdiile they suggest the weight 
of immense waves vaguely formed in the complex 
motion of the sea. 

"A Fair Day" is another of the larger pictures, a 
really superb achievement. Here the sea is dis- 
covered in a mood quite different from that revealed 
in "The Cloud Bank." The sky is beautifully 
handled and the lights are splendidly managed. This 
picture may be mentioned as typical of the artist's 
method. Mr. Donovan is not afraid to use his colors 
boldly and yet because he is faithful in his trans- 
criptions of nature he attains reserve in the impres- 
sion that he gives even after he has employed most 
daring brush strokes. Fidelity is the keynote of all 
his work, and yet the painter is a poet and not a 
realist who sees merely the daily phenomena of 
rushing waters, cloud-haunted skies and dazzling 
lights that change with the passing of the hours. 



"The (lull ". one "i the small pictures, proves how 

much can he told "ii a little canvas. Here the single 
gull is seen skimming the waters. 

"In the .North Sea" is a symphony in gray, an 

exquisite stud) in which wonderfully translucent 
effects have been obtained. In this, as in most of 

his other pictures. Air. Donovan introduces a ship, 
and these ships prove hint to he a seasoned sailor 
who knows all about the handling of the big ocean 
vessels. The ships sail according to the rules of 
navigation. They have motion, and their sails, hard 
pressed h\ the stiff breezes, supply the power that 
propels the vessels. Moreover the water that the 
1" iws cleave is wet. 

"An Irish Headland" introduces a difficult subject 
treated with undeniable success. The sunlight, 
which shines through a rift in the clouds, is concen- 
trated upon the headland, and the colors it brings 
out are admirably employed in contrast with the 




"Running Free." — Marine byjohn Donovan 

subdued tints in the shadowed foreground. In some 
way this picture may be taken as the work that 
gives fullest assurance of the technical achievement 
of the artist. 

"Reflections of the Night" is a study in low tones. 
A lighted ship is reflected in the water. There is 
plenty of atmosphere in this picture and the dark- 
ness has mysterious depths. "A Gathering Storm" 
is one of the good things of this exhibition. An- 
other is "Blustery Weather", in which a heavy sea 
rolls. 

All the pictures are so strong, so fine in concep- 
tion and so direct in execution that it is difficult to 
choose the best among what are so uniformly good. 
Here and there a patch of sky is startlingly blue, but 
no one could find fault with it because there is a 
subtle assurance that it was painted as it appeared 
when the artist beheld it. 

Having accepted these marines as spontaneous 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



interpretations, it is superfluous to remember the 
difficulties that confront the artist who chooses the 
capricious sea for his subject. Mr. Donovan has 
triumphed over many difficulties and it is not too 
much to say that he is one of the coming men. His 
modesty is apparent in the prices he has put upon 
his pictures, which must be recognized as good in- 
vestments, if one can be so oblivious to their charm 
as to consider them from a merely commercial point 
of view. 



All lovers of beautiful pictures will feel some- 
thing like rebellion against, the fate which marked 
AVilliam Keith, the celebrated landscape painter, as 
a victim of an accident which may deprive him of 
the sight of one of his eyes. The first report that 
Mr. Keith might not be able to use his brush again 
brought out expressions of regret from persons in 
every class, for William Keith has become one of 
the proudest possessions of the state. The latest 
bulletins give the hope that the distinguished artist 
may recover completely, but even though he may be 
able again to continue his splendid work the nervous 
shock will retard the completion of his latest pic- 
tures. Mr. Keith is now sixty-eight years old and 
he has belonged to the Pacific coa^t since 1859. 
Within the last ten years he has obtained a world- 
wide fame. In the earthquake and fire of last year 
he lost a number of valuable canvases, althoug-h sev- 
eral of his best-known pictures were saved by the 
heroic efforts of friends who forgot their own pos- 
sessions in their effort to rescue the master's paint- 
ings from destruction. With marvelous fortitude 
Mr. Keith went to .work immediately after the fire 
and the exhibition of his recent work proved that loss 
and misfortune had had no ill effects upon his ex- 
traordinary powers. 



Announcement that Miss Octavia D. Holden will 
remove to San Francisco there to open her studio 
will be received with general regret by Southern 
Californians who have had the privilege of seeing 
her remarkable work in book-binding and of under- 
standing the scope of her artistic achievement. Miss 
Holden came South after the earthquake and fire in 
San Francisco, in which she lost much of her prop- 
erty, including many valuable books that could not 
be replaced and all the rare souvenirs collected in 
Europe. Establishing herself in a studio in Los 
Angeles she made a brave new start, which has 
proved most fortunate, inasmuch as she has won the 
best sort of recognition. She is loyal to San Fran- 
cisco, however, for there her old home has survived 
and she will return to it. A student under the most 
famous bookbinders of Paris, this modest artist 
early showed the greatest possible talent for her 
chosen callinc. Since her return to her native land 
she has produced man}' bindings that are works of 
art, the expression of a spirit that has delicate dis- 
crimination and fine individualitv. 

* * * 

Suspension Not Welcome 

"Your sentence is to be suspended," began the 
merciful court. "Great Scott, Jedge !" exclaimed the 
prisoner, "ef I'd knowed chicken stealing was a 
hanging offense I wouldn't have stole." — Philadel- 
phia Ledger. 



317 -32.-, : ifW\y< 314-32 2 



A. PUSENOT CO. 



"THe Store Beautiful" 

Our Great 



Is increasing in value giving each week. Our special 
offerings have created much enthusiastic comment 
among shrewd buyers, which accounts for its great 
success. The most important feature of next week's 
selling will be the 

Sensatiosaal Sale 
WHITE WASH GOODS 

In staple everyday kinds 



NOTE THE PRICES 
And prepare to get your share of these bargains 

early Monday morning. 

50C.INDIA LINEN at 25c 

35c PERSIAN LAWN a; 20c 

30c NAINSOOK at 20c 

35c FRENCH LAWNS at 2254c 

75c DOTTED SWISSES at 4714c 

35c MERCERIZED WAISTINGS at 15c 



PARLOR MILLINERY. 



eJllls 



Miss Lillie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F J/75 



An Evening With 
Browning 




Readings 
from 

Popular 
Books 



MISS GILBERT will furnish evening entertainments for 
select gatherings during July and August. Address 

421 W. Adams St,. Phone B 3126 



Pacific Outlook 



28 




SOCIETY 




Discussed Equal Suffrage 
Madame Caroline M. Severance invited twenty 
well known equal suffragists to meet several of the 
distinguished X. E. A. visitors last Tuesday after- 
noon at her home, No. 806 \\ esl Vdams street. The 
its of honor were Mr-. Alice L. Parks of San 
Francisco, corresponding secretary of the California 
Equal Suffrage Association; Mrs, Helen Grenfel, oi 
Denver, former state superintendent of public in- 
struction for Colorado; Mrs. Harriet G. R. Wright 
lenver, former member of the Colorado legisla- 
ture; and Miss Dora Moore, one of the leading edu- 
cators of Colorado, (in the shady porch the little 
company assembled to discuss various subjects of 
interest to women. Naturally the topic of political 
equality received first attention and Madame Sev- 
erance's afternoon tea became an experience meet- 
ins '0 which every woman present contributed 
something of more than ordinary interest. The 
hostess brought out many an amusing story as well 
as many a significant reminiscence concerning the 
long battle for the ballot. In addition to the guests 
of honor the following were among those who en- 
joyed Madame Severance's hospitality: Mrs. Eliza 
Tupper Wilkes, Mrs. Lulu Pile Little, Mrs. Charles 
Amadou Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth Boynton Harbert, 
Dr. Avery, Mrs. Bryan, Miss Wills, Miss Seymour, 
Mrs. Mary Holland Kinkaid. 



Famous Bookworker 

Miss Octavia Holden gave a studio tea last Sat- 
urday afternoon in honor of Miss Emily Preston, 
president of the Bookworkers' Guild, who has come 
to Los Angeles from New York for the purpose of 
superintending an exhibition of beautiful books. 
Miss Holden's sister, Mrs. Charles S. Pope, widely 
known as Marion Holden Pope, the artist, assisted 
in receiving the guests. Miss Preston has brought 
West with her many of the books that attracted 
unusual public attention when shown in New York 
last spring. These will be exhibited in the rooms 
occupied by the Arts and Crafts Society for two 
weeks beginning July 24. On the evening of July 
24 there will be a reception at which Miss Preston 
will talk on the aims of the Bookworkers' Guild, 
which numbers among its members many foremost 
artists. 



End of the Art Season 
F. W. Blanchard arranged for the closing of the 
eighth annual exhibition of Southern California 
artists, Wednesday evening, with a reception at 
which society folk and members of aristocratic con- 
tingent of Bohemia enjoyed several hours of pleas- 
ant association. The forty artists who were repre- 
sented in the exhibition were the guests of honor. 
Mrs. Randolph Miner headed the receiving party. 



Mrs. H. T. Whitley, who started Thursday for 
the East, whence she' will sail for Europe, was the 
guest of honor at a reception given Tuesday even- 



in- at Hotel Hollywood. Five hundred guests as- 
sembled to wish Mrs. Whitlej and her daughter a 
pleasant year abroad. Madame Genevra Johnstone- 
Bishop sang several times and there was a good 
musical programme offered by the hotel orchestra. 
Refreshments were served in the picturesque 
arcade, which was artistically decorated with red 
eucalyptus blossoms. In the receiving line with 
Mrs. Whitley were Miss E. C. McCullough, Mis. 
I '. II. Pollock. Mine. Genevra Tohnstone-Bishop. 
Mrs. E. J. Waldron, Mrs. R. P. Mcjohnston. Mrs. 
Bartlett, Miss Hershey, Mrs. J. Jefferson, Mrs. 
Alan Gardiner, General M. H. Sherman, W. C. Pat- 
terson, Robert Hale, Judge M. R. King, Colonel 
Sol. Haas, E. Winter, J. Jepson and F. M. Douglas. 

Max W. Enderlein, son of Mrs. Ella Enderlein, 
writer and clubwoman, and Miss Alice Kay, a well- 
known society girl of Oakland, were married this 
week. After a trip among the summer resorts of 
the North Mr. and Mrs. Enderlein will be at home 
at No. 6056 Playes avenue, Highland Park. Mr. 
Enderlein is a young man who has gained an en- 
viable position in his profession since he was grad- 
uated from college. He and his mother have a 
wide circle of friends in Los Angeles who will give 
cordial welcome to his bride. 

Mrs. A. de B. Mitchell gave a luncheon Thursday 
in honor of her daughter, Mrs. Charles T. Byrne of 
New York City, and Miss Isabel Bottle of Buffalo. 
N. Y. Mrs. Byrne is a musician of extraordinary 
talent and was preparing for the concert stage when 
she married Charles T. Byrne, who has won distinc- 
tion as a playwright. Mr. Byrne has come to Los 
Angeles with Mrs. Byrne and will pass several 
weeks in Southern California. 

At the recent election of officers for the Native 
Daughters of the Golden West the following were 
chosen: Emma G. Fowley, grand president; Emma 
Lillie, grand vice-president ; Laura J. Fakes, grand 
secretary; Mary Dempsey, grand treasurer; Susie 
K. Chrit, grand marshal ; Mary Barry, outside sen- 
tinel ; Mamie Payton, inside sentinel ; Agnes Troy, 
grand organist ; Mary V. Farley, grand trustee. 

Mr. and Airs. Milton K. Young left Los Angeles 
Thursday for Seattle, whence they will sail on July 
23 for a five weeks' trip, through Alaska and Alas- 
kan waters. They will be nassengers on the steam- 
er Jefferson and will penetrate the interior of the 
northern territory as far as White Horse pass, 
traveling by way of Skaguay. 

Miss Maude Scott. No. 1910 Harvard boulevard, 
gave a tea Monday in honor of Miss Jessie Bowers 
of Berkeley'. Both the hostess and her guest of 
honor are member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority 
at the University of California and many of the 
guests were chosen from the Los Angeles Deltas. 

Miss Foy and Miss Florence Foy of San Rafael 
Ranch gave a delightful, dancing party Thursday 
evening at Annandale club house. Miss Florence 
Foy was graduated from Stanford with the class ,,f 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



'07 and the dance was her first social appearance 
since her return to her home. Guests who repre- 
sented the younger sets in Pasadena and Los An- 
geles enjoyed an evening long to be remembered. 
The club house was charmingly decorated and the 
dainty summer costumes made the ball room look 
like a California flower garden. 

Captain and Mrs. Llewellyn Wigmore are visit- 
ing Los Angeles, Captain Wigmore is stationed in 
Washington and has come to Southern California 
to pass a few weeks with his parents. His brother, 
Cyril Wigmore, has come from Arizona to join the 
family party. 

Mrs. Marriner Campbell, the noted San Francisco 
singer, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Hub- 
bard J. Campbell, No. 2035 West Twenty-ninth 
street. Mrs. Campbell is a member of several of the 
principal clubs of San Francisco and is a favorite 
in society. 

Miss Gertrude Hards, No. 749 South Flower 
street, has been entertaining her sister-in-law, Mrs. 
Ira Hards, for the last fortnight. Mrs. Hards is a 
member of Miss Maude Adams's company and on 
the stage is known as Miss Ina Hammers. 

Miss Rey del Valle, the talented young singer, 
started last Thursday for New York. She will sail 
for Europe with Mrs. Adams and Miss Lillian 
Adams. Miss del Valle will study for grand opera 
under teachers in Paris and Berlin. 

Mrs. Hester Tuttle Griffiths, Los Angeles county 
president of the Women's Christian Temperance 
Union, .entertained the Minnesota teachers who at- 
tended the National Educational Association, last 
Monday afternoon at a reception. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Burdette started Monday 
on a seven weeks' trip through the East. Before 
their return in September they will visit New York, 
Boston, Philadelphia and Washington. 

Miss Karol Roger of Tokio, Japan, a magazine 
contributor, is in the city. Miss Roger has made 
a study of social conditions in Japan and has written 
much for the press of the eastern states. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Alles have returned from 
a three weeks' tour through the Yosemite. They 
will go to the seaside for the remainder of the 
summer. 

The engagement of Miss Elizabeth Yoch, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Yoch of Santa Ana, and 
Lieutenant Theodore G. Lewton of the revenue 
cutter service is announced. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Baumgardt, accompanied by 
Cosmo Morgan, Jr., sailed this week for a four 
months' trip abroad, Their first fortnight in Europe 
will be passed in Spain. 

Miss Bessie Dickinson of Kansas City, Mo., is 
visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Fish- 
burn, No. 2266 Harvard boulevard. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abner L. Ross and son, Rugby 
Ross, Xo. 1006 Alvarado street, will start Monday 
for an extended trip through Europe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Clark Carlisle have as their 
house guests at their Terminal Island summer 
home, Leuclaire, M. and Mme. J. A. Donato. 

Professor Wilbur A. Fiske, M. A. will come to 
Occidental College from Richmond, Indiana, to 
teach geology, chemistry and physics, and Profes- 



sor Calvin Olin Esterly, Ph. D., formerly an in- 
structor at Harvard, will have the chair of biology 
in the absence of Professor McClelland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dan L. McFarland are at Lake 
Tahoe and will remain at the northern resort until 
the first week in August. 

Mrs. Kenneth Shibley of Phoenix, Arizona, is 
visiting her mother, Mrs. J. A. Bovard, No. 1428 
Albany street. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Mcjohnston have removed 
to their beautiful new home on S} r camore avenue, 
Hollywood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fielding J. Stilson are rejoicing over 
the possession of a daughter who came to them last 
Saturday. 

■ Mr. and Mrs. Howard Huntington are now oc- 
cupying their beautiful new home at Oak Knoll. 

Mrs. Andrew Mullen and her daughter, Miss 
Marie Mullen, are at Ocean Park. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund T. Perkins will remain in 
Santa Monica during August. 

Miss Edith Herron, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Rufus Herron, is at Catalina. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Murphy are passing the sum- 
mer at the Thousand Islands. 

Mrs. Leo Chandler gave a luncheon to twelve 
young women last Thursday. 

Mrs. Adams-Fisher is making a tour through 
Spain. 

Miss Ludovici of Pasadena is at Santa Monica. 




ISffiKS 



Toilet 
Parlors 



The most sanitary and the most up-to-date hair 
dressing parlors — with the largest an'd.most complete 
stock of hair goods in the city. 

All her preparations are guaranteed under the pure food and drug laws. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Manicuring 
HEADQUARTERS 

Central Department Store , 

609-619 South Broadway 
On Balcony Adjoining Ladies' Rest Room 




MACMNALD'S HA MMING COLLEGE Wanted- 

Women 
Students 



TO LEARN A PROFITABLE BUSINESS 

The demand for our graduates is far greater than 
the supply. We want bright young women to take 
the Summer Course — Special rates for July, August 
and September. 

Mcdonald, 204 mercantile place, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Pacific Outlook 



25 



HARRIS'S NEW INVENTION 



Auditorium Baths Tilted 'With the Voco 
Pneumo System 

The ninth floor of the Auditorium buildin 
been utilized for what at first entrance appears to be 

nn exclusive private club. The express elevator 
carries visitors to a large reception room beautifully 
furnished in dull mahogany. Here an attendant 
waits to direct women to the right and men to the 
left. Nothing more inviting or more exclusive can 
lie found anywhere than this gorgeous suite of 
thirty rooms, high in the middle tower of the big 
building, which hundreds of patrons know as the 
Auditorium Bath and Toilel Parlors. 

The door at the right admits women to a long 
corridor, wide and light, from which open a number 
of charming little rooms done in the coolest tints 
and equipped with snowy couches and dainty dress- 
ing tables. Here the patrons enjoy massage and a 
siesta after the baths. The hath rooms are spacious 
ami all are finished in white enamel and white tiling. 
Here are the cabinets for electric light baths, the 
rooms lor the salt glow, the steam room and the 
room in which the showers play upon tiled floors. 
The improved Turkish baths, the electric light 
baths, and the vaco pneumo treatment are given 
under the direction of Mrs. L. Pennrich, one of the 
proprietors of the baths, a woman known as a 







' ' I 


1 






^» >'F -"^l 



skilled dermatologist and a scalp specialist. For a 
number of years Mrs. Pennrich has had a clientele 
among society women and the fact that she accepted 
only the best patronage made it possible for her to 
build up a large business. While the baths became 
famous first because of their beautifying effects and 
their efficacy in reducing superfluous flesh, they are 
most widely known because of the beneficial results 
in treatment for rheumatism and nervous disorders. 
Leading physicians recommend them and therefore 
they are enjoyed by the sick and the well. 

At the end oi the corridor is a iarge room sump- 
tuously fitted up for the toilet parlors. On a raised 
floor close to the windows are tables for the mani- 
curing work. Below this platform are the ap- 
pliances for shampooing. These include the latest 
driers and the instrument for vibratory massage. 
Easy chairs and divans are supplied for patrons who 
desire to rest after a scalp treatment. 

There is a special room for facial treatments. 
Here big chairs are placed facing the light so that 
the least defect in the complexion can be discovered. 
Every modern scientific device, including the instru- 
ment for the vaco pneumo treatment, is employed 
here i>\ Mrs. Pennrich. who is a skilled practitioner 



with a reputation for procuring splendid results in 
using methods that are approved by the besl physi- 
cians. 

The VacO Pneumo System forces the blood into 

the muscle, thereby stretching tin- fibres and liga- 
ments, and gets it out of its natural condition, or, 
more truly speaking, the unnatural condition into 
which it has fallen, and following up the exercises, 
it is forced stiil further out of its dormant state, 
and a rapid growth of size and strength is promoted. 

The department given up to men's baths is not 
less artistically equipped than that of the women. 
It is in charge of a noted athlete who understands 
scientific physical training. The baths attract many 
men wdio are suffering from overwork, nervous 
dyspepsia and rheumatism. The improved Turkish 
baths, which eliminate the necessity of breathing 
hot air or steam, are given with the vaco pneumo 
treatment, which produces remarkable results. This 
vaco pneumo system was invented by C. R. Harris, 
the famous Los Angeles inventor to whom three 
hundred patents on various devices have been 
issued. 

In connection with the baths is a room for 

chiropody and all who enter this ninth floor of the 

Auditorium may go forth improved from the crown 

of the head to the soles of the feet. — Adv. 

* * * 

WE NEED MORE REST 



By Chart.8S F. Aked, D. D., op New York 

Man, like the other animals, was meant for the 
fresh air and the open fields, for the storms, the 
snows and the sunshine. But he claps a stone box 
down over his head, sets it in the midst of a hun- 
dred thousand other stone boxes as ugly as his own, 
stretching away in bewildering squares and parallel- 
ograms, shutting out God's aid and light, until 
he is ready to faint on a warm day and freeze on a 
cold one, and die of pneumonia — or terror — if the 
east wind blows upon him. 

This crowded, rushing, pushing, crushing city 
life gets on our nerves. We live too fast. We live 
faster than men ever lived before. We live more 
than twenty-four hours in the day and more than 
seven days in the week. We burn the candle at 
both ends, and then, for fear that our neighbor will 
get ahead of us, we light it in the middle, too. We 
are consumed by the fever of living-. We exhaust 
our vital energies in unending stress and strain. 

We have no time to think. It is much as we can 
be expected to do if we earn bread and cheese and 
lay by a pound or two against a rainy day-. The 
great majority of us arc just as capable of flying as 
we are of thinking. Leisure for quiet contempla- 
tion of the world which we live in is denied us. 
There is no grass beneath our feet, no blue sky over 
our head. The world of trees and flowers and sing- 
ing birds is not for us. Art and poetry and gentle 
culture exist only in a world of dreams. While if 
we once gave ourselves pause to meditate upon the 
deep things of God and the soul, on time and its 
meaning, life and its mysteries, heaven and the 
glories which we thrust away, why — we might miss 
the next car ! 

The injunction which insulin me every time I 
travel in the subway is: '"Step lively, now! Hurry 
up. there!" Hurry by all means, for we could not 
live if we did not kill ourselves to get somewhere 

el-e. 



26 



Pacific Outlook 




Anglo-Saxon French 

"Divorcons", the latest offering at the Belasco,- 
may be considered as one of the most successful 
plays ever put on by the stock cmpany. Sardou's 
finished comedy is quite a dangerous experiment for 
an American company, as it does not demand great 
power in elocution, dramatic sentiment or sentimen- 
tality. It is a piece de salon, full of spirit, finesse 
and distinction, and such a play in incompetent 
hands would have been an entire failure. 

The part of Cyprienne was given by Miss Lillian 
Albertson with such a distinguished taste and 
routine, mingled with an enchanting naivete, that 
it did not leave anything to be desired, except a 
better pronunciation of the French "Monsieur". 
The' pronunciation of "Monsieur" is most difficult 
in the French language, and especially for the 
Anglo-Saxon tongue and should be avoided. From 
a logical point of view it is difficult to understand 
why "Monsieur" should not be translated if the 
whole play is Anglicized. Except Miss Carey, no- 
body in the whole cast did any justice to poor 
"Monsieur." 

Hobart Bosworth as des Prunelles was perfectly 
convincing in every way. He played the French 
gentleman with a comprehension "that could not 
have been better if he had studied him in the 
French capital, and in many ways surpassed the 
original French creator. As Mr. Bosworth is 
blessed by nature with all the qualities an actor 
requires — good exterior, temperament and distinc- 
tion — his creation of des Prunelles would have 
made a furore even in France. 

With the staging of the last act I could not 
agree, as it was done especially to please the gallery. 
The entire lack of real atmosphere in the little 
French restaurant, with the impossible proprietor 
or head waiter of Mr. Murphy, spoiled quite the 
real idea. Mr. Murphy, who did honor to his name 
and reputation in overacting his part, disgusted 
every one belonging to the intelligent class in the 
audience. In the Grand opera house he would per- 
haps have made a hit, but in the Belasco Stock 
Company he was out of place. A French police 
■ commissioner is a gentleman — I would like to have 
that understood — and he behaves like one. The 
police commissioner created by Mr. Marker was a 
figure that does not exist in France. He does not 
dress like Mr. Marker's commissioner nor speak 
like him, and he takes off his cap in any room which 
he may enter. A French count or duke or prince 
on the American stage is always dressed with a red 
scarf or a, red rag crossing his body, probably to 
point out his rank. Do the American stage man- 
agers believe all the counts and police commis- 
sioners in France run around wearing this badge 
on the streets and everywhere? In France it is 
the pall bearers only that wear such insignia. Such 



things do not exist, either in the noblesse or in the 
police, and it is wrong to furnish the American 
people with ideas concerning costumes that are 
never worn. Howard Scott as Adhemar de Gratig- 
non was a character study of his own and one to 
commend when not exaggerated. For my taste he 
was too muddy, but others may like the impersona- 
tion, perhaps ! The minor parts played by Miss 
Berg, Miss Smythe, Mr. Yerance and Mr. Living- 
stone were well acted and added a great deal to the 
success of the play. B. de L. 



Maude Adams's L'Aiglon 

Miss Maude Adams's engagement in Los Angeles 
is in many ways the most brilliant success of the 
theatrical season. To see this charming woman is 
to reverence her and to admire her art. After her 
extraordinary performance of "Peter Pan", her 
"LAiglon" proved her versatility. To this role 
she brings the same elusive charm, the same sweet- 
ness and the same exquisite quality that lift all her 
characterizations'to a plane quite their own. When 
Miss Adams first dared to essay LAiglon. at a time 
in which Madame Bernhardt had marked it as her 




A PROPOSITION 




The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St. 




Office Phone: Jt lost 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

S55 South Hill Street 
Residence Phone: B 2727 



Pacific Outlook 



own. it was said of the American that when com- 
pared with the French woman her eaglet was a 
Yet those who have seen both actresses in 
this remarkable role must feel that Miss Adams 
invested the unfortunate L'Aiglon with a more 
vincing personality than that bestowed upon him 
by Bernhardt, who rose to superb dramatic heights 
but left something t" be desired in the lighter 
scenes. "Qualitj Street" is one of the plays to be 
enjoyed again and again. Mo one can sec ii with- 
out feeling the heart throb of delight in both actress 
and play. It is with keenest regrel that the people 
■of Los \.ngeles will saj farewell to the most loved 
woman on the American stage. 



County Fair a Success 
"The County Fair" at the Burbank Theater this 
week was well cast. Although there was a novel 
distribution of roles, in which the stage manager 
apparently paid little attention to the rank of the 
players, it was evident that the company was in the 
best of spirits. Mr. Desmond appeared in a charac- 
ter part, which doubtless disappoints the matinee 
girls. The amusing pictures of rural life presented 
in the drama provided entertainment that is first- 
class. The play is well mounted. If "The County 
Fair" were not so well acted it would be worth 
while to pay for an admission for the purpose of 
enjoying the scenery. 

Briefer Notes 

After ripening at the Garden Theater, New York. 
with a brief return engagement of "Madame Butter- 
fly". Henry Savage will produce "The Merry 
Widow", the latest European operetta success. 

Giacomo Piccini has announced that the gold 
miners of California will be the chief personages 
in his next opera, to be begun as soon as he finishes 
the one built upon the life of Marie Antoinette. 

Grieg marked his fifty-fourth birthday anniver- 
sary last month on the same day as that celebrated 
by Madame Schumann-Heink and Madame Gadski, 
who made their advent much later than he. 

The Berlin "Tageblatt" gravely announced that 
when Strauss's "Salome" was performed in Wil- 
mington, Del., the manager, stage manager and 
prima donna were arrested for immoral conduct. 
Much of the American musical news printed in 
Germany is about as accurate as the account of the 
reception of "Salome" in the Delaware city, where 
it was never presented. 

* * * 

Fellowship School 

Benjamin Fay Mills and Mrs. Mills this week 
opened a summer school for Fellowship members 
and other students interested in philosophical sub- 
jects. The morning sessions are held in a shady 
glen near Edendale and the afternoon classes meet 
at Fellowship bouse. Professor J. H. Hyslop, for- 
merly of Columbia University, will lecture before 
the school. 

* * * 
Entitled to Recreation. 

When it is known that on the programme of the 
recent N. E. A. convention there were three hundred 
addresses and papers on as many different subjects, 
every one in California will agree that the teachers 
ought to be given all the entertainment the state 
can possibly offer. 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yourself. 

Tlhe <Geiaiilesimeia ! 's Taalos 
114 WEST THIRD «ST]R,EBT 



Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 




28 



Pacific Outlook 



inheritance: and income tax 



By a Special Contributor 

There seems to be a strong and growing senti- 
ment in this country in favor of the introduction of 
laws to check growth of large individual fortunes. 
For this purpose two remedies are proposed, either 
one of which would have, to a certain extent, the 
desired result, but in operation they would have a 
widely different effect; one of them, a tax on in- 
heritances, would simply have the effect of reducing 
the amount of a fortune held by an individual and 
transmitted through his death to some one else, and 
would in no way effect the conditions under which 
the fortune of the individual might be increased 
during his lifetime. 

Speaking in a general way, under fair competitive 
conditions the size of the fortune accumulated by 
the individual would represent the value of his ser- 
vice to the world, and for this reason it would seem 
desirable that his usefulness to society should not 
be interfered with or restricted through taking such 
action as would deprive him of any part of the 
wealth he might be said to have created, and there- 
by narrow the field of his operations and lessen the 
importance of his work. The thing to be aimed at 
should be to bring about fair competitive conditions 
and then to permit each individual to accumulate 
wealth in proportion to his ability. Society as a 
whole would be most benefited under conditions 
which would not disco.urage the efforts of the most 
capable and intelligent. 

If a man has accumulated a large fortune under 
fair competitive conditions, it is pretty good evi- 
dence his efforts have resulted in an economy of 
some kind, and that society has been benefited by 
this economy. Of course, this would not always be 
true. A man might become very wealthy through 
being favored by chance, but fortunes resulting 
from chance would be so few in comparison with 
those which w'ere the result of better directed effort 
they could not be taken into account in framing a 
law which would have to be general in its operation. 

While we may assume that under fair competitive 
conditions, a man would secure only that portion of 
the aggregate wealth produced which his efforts 
entitled him to, it does not follow that the person 
who would inherit this wealth would make equally 
good use of it. In fact the inheritor of wealth might 
be so incompetent that, in the handling of a large 
fortune, he would inflict a great loss upon society 
through misdirecting- and making unproductive the 
labor which inherited wealth gave him the power to 
employ. That he might distribute this wealth among 
his employes as wages until it had all been ex- 
hausted would affect, in no way, the economic loss 
society would suffer through his incompetency: 

When wealth is inherited by a man who uses it 
merely for his own pleasure, or when he is incapable 
of using it intelligently for productive purposes, it 
would be much better .for the public if such wealth 
had been buried with the man who had accumulated 
it. Wealth in the possession of anyone devoting his 
whole time to pleasure seeking, or in the possession 
of anyone who. whether through incompetency or 
selfishness, employs labor in a way and for such 
purpose as will not result in an addition in some 
form to the aggregate wealth of the world, is simply 
taking from society and giving nothing in return. 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
.SAVINGS/- BANK 




The building of a 
Bank Account is 
not difficult if the 
"builder" is persist- 
ent. 



This Bank is the medium through -which over 20,000 
people are saving money. Q Bear in mind that the German- 
American Savings Bank has the largest Capital and Surplus 
of any Savings Bank in Los Angeles. ^Resources over 
$ 1 0,000,000. Four per cent on deposits. 

(Berman-Amrrirait g>atmigs Sank 

223 South Spring St,. Branch: Main and First, Sts. 




Sing Fat Co., inc. 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-ig South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 112! POST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



Los Angeles 

OstricK Farm 

Opposite 

EAST LAKE PARR 

Most Beautiful Feather Display 
Ever Made in Los .Angeles- 5c 
Car Fare on Cily or Pacific Elec- 
tric Cars. 

5 Acres of Gigantic 
Birds 




th (gtubifortum QBaffl anb Zoikt (parfotB 



■For Ladies and Gentle 



900 AUDITORIUM BUILING 

FIFTH AND OLIVE STS. 



Telephone Home F 5024 



MRS. L. PENNRICH 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



lust so far a> a wealthy man employs labor unpro- 
ductively, just to that extent the world would be 
bettter off if the wealth possessed by him was in 

the hands of some one who would use it all for the 
purpose of employing labor productivi 

Ear as societj is concerned, it should never go 

•ml the point of seeing to it that the COndil 
under which great fortunes are acquired are such 
that the persons possessing them always shall he 
compelled torendera service to the public in propor- 
tion to the size of the fortune. The fact that a man 
under existing laws may be in line to inherit great 
wealth is no indication that he has the ability or 
the disposition t" use that wealth in the manner 
most beneficial to the public. 

There would seem to lie no public reason why the 
present system regulating inheritances should be 
retained or continued. Under proper competitive 
conditions, if all men were to begin their life work 
mu absolutely equal terms, it would be fair to as- 
sume those would become the superintendents- of 
labor who were most capable of directing it intelli- 
gently and economically. In fact if we did not con- 
sider the element of chance which might occasional- 
rive the wrong man power to employ and mis- 
direct labor, the result indicated, of starting all men 
on equal terms, would be inevitable. 

The present inheritance laws are not based upon 
any natural right of any individual, no matter what 
the relationship, to inherit the wealth created or 
accumulated by some one else. The legal right .of 
any one to inherit wealth is purely an artificial one. 
The laws regulating inheritance differ widely in 
different countries and have differed just as much 
at different periods in the same country. In England, 
until a very few years ago, the law was such that a 
landed estate had to descend to the nearest male 
heir, and this witho_ut any regard to his character 
or ability; and I believe the law is still such that a 
landed estate, or any part of it, may be diverted 
from the nearest male heir with his consent only. 

When a man possessed of wealth dies, only those 
should participate in inheriting his estate who were 
so nearly related to him as to have been during his 
life dependent upon him for support. Because of 
the ridiculous law now in operation instances are 
continually occurring of individuals inheriting large 
fortunes which have been created or accumulated 
by someone of whose very existence they were not 
aware. It is at present deemed sufficient that chance 
has made him the nearest living relative. 

The statement so often used that the wife should 
inherit a certain proportion of the estate of her 
husband because she has assisted in accumulating 
it cannot be regarded as an argument in favor of 
the natural right of anybody to inherit, for if she is 
to receive a portion of the estate simply because 
she has assisted in accumulating it, it should not 
be regarded as an inheritance at all, for if she 
created or accumulated to the extent of the portion 
of the whole estate the law accords her, it is hers not 
because of any right of inheritance, but because she 
was the creator of it. 

A fair and equitable inheritance law would be one 
wdiere the right of inheritance does not extend to 
any one beyond the immediate family of the indi- 
vidual leaving the estate. Where the estate is. a 
large one. the public interest would undoubtedly be 
better served if the government took a portion of it, 



and the larger the estate the larger proportion of it 
the government should take. 

An income tax is the other remedy proposed for 
the purpose of preventing a too rapid growth of 
large private fortunes. For the reason that this 
tax would place an undue and unfair burden upon 
wealth used for productive purposes as against 
w ealth not so used, such a tax would be both un- 
wise and unfair. The taxes should be levied so far 
as possible in the manner that would most encour- 
age the employment of wealth for productive pur- 
pose and discourage so far as possible the use of 
wealth for the selfish gratification of the individual 
possessing it. There would seem to be no good 
reason why the man who owns a farm which he 
uses for the purpose of producing wealth should pay 
a higher tax rate on it than his neighbor has to pay 
upon a farm equally as large and naturally as pro- 
ductive which he uses for a pleasure park, or why 
the man who invests his money in traction engines 
to be used in assisting in the production of wealth 
should pay a higher tax rate upon them than the 
man who invests an equal amount in automobiles 
to be used for his own pleasure, or why the man 
who invests a million dollars in a factory, giving 
profitable employment to a thousand workers, 
should pay a greater sum in taxes than the man 
who puts the same amount in a private residence 
for himself. 

It would seem the public interest would be better 
served, if a distinction were to be made at all, in 
taxing these two forms of wealth, productive and 
unproductive, that the unproductive form of wealth 



Mr. Advertiser — 

It's Time to Harness Up 



with the Pacific Outlook and enjoy the bene- 
fits of our subscription campaign for June, 
July and August. 

We shall be doing some lively hustling — 
making hay while the sun is shining — and in 
order to reach the homes where goods are 
bought and consumed in large quantities, you 
will find the Pacific Outlook a valuable asset. 



May L. Evans and Vera E. Herrmann 

Public Stenographers 
Notaries Public .... 

Appointments can be made for Evening or Sunday Work 

p. „ JHomt F 6904 
Phon "lMain 5154 

CONVENIENT TO ALL PRINCIPAL HOTELS 
Opposite Angelus. one block from Van Nuya. one block from Alexan- 
dria, one block from Westminster, in the center 
of the business district 

Suite Four Hundred and Ten Union Trust Building 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



should be made to carry the heaviest burden, and 
so the conversion of wealth into capital encouraged. 
But as any discrimination in the tax rate undoubted- 
ly would result in confusion and injustice of all 
kinds, it would be best to make no attempt to dis- 
criminate at all. If it is desirable that a tax be 
levied, having for its object the prevention of a 
rapid growth of large individual fortunes, it should 
be graded according to the size of the fortune with- 
out any regard to the income of the individual 
possessing it. This would answer the same purpose 
as an income tax and would not have the effect of 
discouraging the employment of wealth for product- 
ive purposes. Another reason for levying a tax 
upon wealth itself and not upon the income derived 
from it is that the amount of wealth would be much 
more easily ascertained than the income of the per- 
son possessed of the wealth. The wealth is usually 
in the form of real estate, factory buildings, rail- 
roads, etc., which cannot very well be hidden or lied 
about by its owner. 

To arrive at the income of an individual in any 
other way than by accepting his statement in regard 
to it would, in most cases, be impossible, and for 
that reason such a tax would be placing a premium 
upon dishonesty and compelling the honest posses- 
sors of wealth to pay more than their share of the 
taxes. In fact, taxes should be levied on those 
forms of wealth only which cannot be hidden from 
the assessor. Taxes should always be levied in that 
manner which would leave the largest net amount 
after the cost of collection had been deducted, and 
so the aggregate amount collected as taxes would 
be fairly and equitably distributed among the peo- 
ple. This result can never be obtained so long as 
forms of wealth which are easily hidden are subject 
to taxation. Under such a system, the honest man 
possessing this form of wealth will always pay a 
larger tax rate than the dishonest man possessing 
the same form of wealth. Then, too, the cost of levy- 
ing and collecting taxes on personal property, money 
in bank, etc., must always represent a larger propor- 
tion of the amount collected than that portion of the 
tax collected from lands, buildings, etc. 

Such a tax law as that suggested as the proper 
one would not very largely decrease the amount of 
wealth on which taxes were levied. While at first 
glance it might appear that relieving some forms 
of wealth of the tax burden entirely, and increasing 
the taxes collected from other forms of wealth! 
would work an injustice to the individuals pos- 
sessing wealth upon which they were compelled 
to pay taxes, we will find upon analysis that this 
would not be the case, and taxes paid on any form 
of wealth employed productively are just as much 
a part of the cost of production as wages paid to 
labor, and for this reason any addition in the rate 
would simply serve to raise the price of whatever 
the wealth or property taxed was producing, and a 
decrease in the tax rate would have the effect of 
decreasing correspondingly the price at which what- 
ever the wealth was producing would sell for. 

The. movement up in the price of things produced 
by wealth paying taxes and down in the price of 
things produced by wealth not paying taxes would 
have to continue until the profit realized on these 
two classes of property had become equal. In fact, 
it makes no difference upon what sort of property 
the taxes are levied. In the final analysis the whole 



>©3i©i 



Facing 

the 

Park 

and 
Close 

to 
Ocean 



Hotel Savoy 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Everything New 
No. 142-144 Pacific Avenue 

Long Beach, Cal. 



Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 

Home 
Phone 
1743 



, 1 



Phone Home 441 — ff ~(\ . . 

A @I|g fUmcra 

The Largest and Leading 

Hotel in Long 

Beach 

Modern in all its 
H Appointments .. 

M. A. SCHUTZ, M. D. 

Proprietor 

Massage and Turkish Baths in Connection 

Rooms $3.00 per Week and Up 

Corner Second and Chestnut Sts. Long Beach, Cal. 




.T m E WEST 



ALIA. 



M. J. BLAISDELL, Proprietor 



1 30 West, Third Street, 

ROOMS — Prices from 75 cents per day and up 



Home Phone 1163 Sunset 3443 

HoSel Yale (European) 

Corner First and Pacific Ave. 

and "SURF VIEW on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M. WORMLEY, Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies, Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread, "Like mother used to make" 

Home Phone J07S 
114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



CI}? %ntljta atti Amt?x 



Leading Apartment House in Long Beach 

Opposite Auditorium — Pleasure Pier — P. E. 
Depot and Fronting the Ocean 

Single rooms and 2, 3 and 4 room suites. Every suite has 
private bath. Home 24. P. O. Box 214. 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



ile themselves must bear the burden of taxation 
— each individual just in proportion as he buys or 
the things produced by the property paying 
the tax. The only tax that does not distribute itself 
or that gives one individual an advantage over 
others is one that admits of one man owning a cer- 
tain kind of property escaping taxation while other 
men owning the same form of property are com- 
pelled to pay taxes upon it. Such a condition simply 
results in increasing the profits of the man owning 
the property upon which he has paid no tax. So 
long as all men are compelled to pay the same rate 
of tax upon the same kind of property, the public 
itself must pay the whole amount of money col- 
lected as taxes. 

It is difficult to understand why anyone should 
advocate a graduated tax on income rather than a 
graduated tax on the whole amount of wealth pos- 
sessed by an individual. The result desired would 
certainly be more closely arrived at under the latter 
system and it would in no way discourage the use 
of wealth for productive purpose by compelling it, 
when so employed, to pay an amount in taxes 
greater than k would be compelled to bear if not 
1 1 !■ ;ed. 

* * * 

StrycHnine for Snake Poison 

"The best antidote I know of for snake poison of 
any kind is strychnine." says Prof. Julius Hurter, 
curator of the Academy of Science of St. Louis, in 
an interview in the Albuquerque Citizen. "Inject 
this into the blood in large doses; but first be sure 
you are bitten bv a venomous reptile, or the poison 
will kill you. The venom of a snake is quick acting 



and paralyzes the heart. Under this abnormal con- 
dition the injection of large doses of strychnine 
serves to stimulate the action of the heart. Any 
stimulant that quickens the heart is helpful when 
one has been bitten by a venomous reptile. Suck- 
ing the wound is good also, but cauterizing is use- 
less except in rare eaves when the poison has not 
penetrated beneath the surface flesh. The wound 
should always he widened to allow the blood to flow 
freely ; often the poison will flow off with the blood." 

* * * 
Fruit of Idleness 

It is estimated that between 7,000 and 8,000 idle 
Mexican laborers are now in Los Angeles waiting 
for the busy season to open. Inasmuch as there is 
little railroad building in July and August these 
cannot find employment and they have no amuse- 
ment except what the saloons offer. It is not sur- 
prising that the police records of each day show 
rights and stabbing affrays in addition to many plain 
drunks. 

* * * 

For tKe Long-eared One 
The second day drew to its close with the twelfth 

juryman still unconvinced. 

"Well, gentlemen," said the court officer, entering 

quietly, "shall I, as usual, order twelve dinners?" 
"Make it," said the foreman, "eleven dinners and 

a bale of hay." — Human Life. 

* * * 

Missionary — And do you know nothing what- 
ever of religion? Cannibal — Well, we got a taste 
of it when the last missionary was here. — Cleve- 
land Leader. 













THE WAYSIDE PRESS 




214 FRANKLIN STREET 




Printers, Designers, Binders 


J*slf~^\ 




The Character of the Work Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 




_X J> 




QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 








Home A 1853 -Phones— Main 1566 






PRINTING THAT TALKS 









■YOU TAKE A BIG RISK- 



When Your Dealer Says to You 

"We have our own brand, which costs less because we 
don't have any advertising expense;'' or, "This is just as good 
and costs less;'' or, "We know this brand and recommend it. 
The kind you ask for costs more, and you couldn't tell the 
difference." 



If you take his advice instead of insisting 
on the advertised brand 



You asked him for what you wanted — probably 
because advertising of one kind or another had 
convinced you. 

The manufacturer who did that advertising did' it 
at considerable expense to prove to you that his 
goods were worth trying. 

If he didn't use every care to make them just as 
perfect as he knew how, he couldn't hope that they 
would convince you of their merit when you tried 
them. Yet he spent his money to reach you with 
his arguments, trusting to his goods to prove them. 

Isn't it pretty certain, Chen, that they are good of 
their kind? 

When he has created a general demand for his 
goods, in come the imitators, trading on his demand 
— the "just as good" and all the rest, with no care- 
fully built up reputation to preserve, no expensively 
bought business to endanger, and probably little or 
no expense in making the product they hope to. sub- 
stitute for the advertised article. 

YOUR SAFETY lies in the advertised brand- 
back of it is the makers' guarantee and the maga- 
zine's guarantee. The Dealer who offers you some- 
thing "just as good" isn't good enough for you. Tell 
him his guarantee is not good enough and 



Have you ever traded at a store whose policy is 
never to advertise? Did it not try to convince you 
that its goods were cheaper than its competitors' — 
because it had no advertising bills to pay? Don't 
believe such arguments — go to the advertised store 
and see for yourself. 

ARE THESE FACTS VITAL TO YOU 

The advertised store has a better and more up-to- 
date stock — it turns its stock quickly by advertising 
and fills the space with new goods. 

The advertised store "has better and more ex- 
perienced clerks — it knows the goods it sells. 

The advertised store cheerfully rectifies all mis- 
takes — you go away feeling pleased and return with 
your friends. 

The advertised firm adopts the newest and best 
in every department, and conducts its business with 
a modern business system. 

The advertised store is invariably more reliable, 
and you can depend upon the quality of the goods 
it advertises. 

Can you find these things in the store whose policy 
is — never to advertise? 

Advertising is business promotion — it is the fuel 
that keeps the boilers hot — and the merchant who 
does it sj'stematically is a Twentieth Century busi- 
ness man. 

He spends his money to convince you that the 
"oods lie advertises are as represented, and he will 
make good. Trade with the advertiser — purchase 
advertised goods — they are more reliable and — cost 
no more. 



ASK AGAIN FOR WHAT YOU WANT 
AND INSIST ON GETTING IT I ! I 



Lo* An 



gelt**. Californio 



Origin of Mormon Polygamy 



July 27. 1907 



/ 






Li 



•"■WBB8J 



V 



A.W ED 



IND 



_™*nm ' — ... — . . j_.. — - — _ 

■!■ ^ UE NT,-rr.,.- 1 -^r.lL-Ft-^f 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



HE YEAR $ 2°2 





TO 



Shirt waists that portray the latest dictates from the great 
fashion centers. Shirt waists that emphasize the faithfulness 
of the manufacturer in their fitting and wearing qualities. 
These are the good points that go to make the Shirt Waists 
at The Fifth Street Store distinctive. We have put much 
thought and time and money into making this the best shirt 
waist department in Los Angeles. Best not only in point of 
style, fit and wearing qualities, but the very best in point of 
value giving. Visit this department and see these matchless 
waists. The economy we offer you is worthy of your serious 
attention. 




BROADWAY 



COR Finn ST. 




T5he True OsteopatH 

is the true 

PHYSICIAN 

He must be fitted to do the best thing possible under 
every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

Will teach you the science of the true Osteopath. 
Fall term begins September 3. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
Pres.; Stanley M. Hrnter, Vice-Pres.; W. J. Cook, 
Sec, and C. A, Whiting, Chairman of the Faculty. 
Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 




IttjfE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, q If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-operative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



MM& J)M 




George Baker Jtnderson 

EDITOR 



A Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland Klnkald 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gattoupe 

MANAGER 



Published erery Saturday at 423*423 Chamber of Com* 
merce Build ng. Lot Jtngeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on alt neujs stands. 

~red a* second-class matter April ;, trp - , at the postofrice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March j, 1879. 

Vol. 3. Los .Angeles, CaL.July 27, 1907 Mo. 4 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If TOOT manuscr.pl is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

NOTICE. TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 

"We need clean, healthy newspapers, with clean, 
healthy criticism which shall be FEARLESS AND 
TRUTHFUL."— Theodore Roosevelt. 

COMMENT 

Colonel George Brinton McClellan Harvey, editor 
of Harper's Weekly and one of the most thorough- 
going friends of vested rights, right or wrong, but 
vested rights ; of public utility corporations, of com- 
binations of capital as opposed to combinations of 
labor, of the rich as opposed to the poor — a smug- 
faced "stand patter," for long an avowed enemy 
of Roosevelt and the principles for which Roose- 
velt stands, the constructor and president of various 
electric railroads and a professed independent 
Democrat, recently returned from a 
Critic of long European trip with the cheering 
Roosevelt intelligence that, in his opinion, Presi- 
dent Roosevelt "is far and away the 
most popular man in the world.'' Roosevelt, a man 
of "blatant probity", as he was once characterized 
by Colonel Harvey, is said by him to be beloved of 
royalty because of his autocratic tendencies: im- 
mensely popular with the commercial classes in 
Europe because his policy has "impaired American 
credit and crippled American competition;" lauded 
by socialists and anarchists because he is the first 
tn accord to them "open and favorable recognition" 
as "a class entitled to special consideration." 
* * * 
The views expressed by Colonel Harvey will not 
have the weight in America that would be accorded 



them if their author were not a man who. through- 
nut his whole career, had contended for the very 
principles which politicians of the Roosevelt school 
uppose. There are few Americans who have de- 
voted any attention whatever to a study of corpora- 
tion or financial affairs who will accept Colonel 
Harvey's declaration that Roosevelt has destroyed 
American credit abroad. Every intelligent man is 
aware of the fact that European 
Hot Weather countries have been quick to avail 
Fiction themselves of American methods 

of industrial development. Colonel 
Harvey has overshot the mark in his attack upon 
the President. His imagination has indulged in one 
of those wild flights which sometimes result in the 
production of very readable hot weather fiction. 
He probably has told the truth in regard to the 
popularity of Roosevelt in foreign lands, but in his 
analysis of the causes of this popularity he either 
has not delved deeply or has been influenced by his 
early political training and his more recent political 
and financial environments. 
* * * 
Men whose lives have been devoted to enterprises 
similar to those which have made Colonel Harvey 
a millionaire are not, as a rule, unbiassed and there- 
fore competent judges of the measures and the mo- 
tives of men of the Roosevelt stamp. In his case, 
as in that of many other anti-administration men, 
and wish probably has been father to the thought. 
The facts do not' bear out his contention that 
American trade in Europe has suffered as the result 
of the Roosevelt policies. The Philadelphia Press 
gives us several items of evidence to sustain the 
contrary claim. For example, "Standard Oil," says 
the Press, "does more business abroad than any 
other American corporation. Does any one believe 
for a moment that this enterprising 
Won't Fool purveyor of petroleum has lost the 
the People sale of a single quart of oil because of 
the efforts of the L T nited States to 
make it obey the laws? It is true that Mr. Harri- 
man says he was about to sell a big lot of bonds in 
Paris when the Alton disclosures spoiled his mar- 
ket. But in this case it was Harriman's credit, and 
not Union Pacific's, that was cast under a cloud. 
Eliminate Hariman and his methods from the Un- 
ion, and it could probably do what the Pennsylvania 
railroad did, namely, sell $50,000,000 of bonds to the 
Frenchmen." Colonel Harvey, in his desire to give 
the President a black eye, has endeavored to fool 



4 



Pacific Outlook 



the American people ; but the country has more 
thinkers than it had a few years ago and alarmist 
reports like' those which he has brought back from 
Europe with him will not be accepted by the aver- 
age citizen without a little independent investiga- 
tion and thought. 

* * * 

Are the fingers of America on the hair trigger, 
with the weapon pointed toward Japan> as some 
critics of the administration appear to think or to 
desire that Americans should think? Hardly. It 
has been suggested that the policy advised by Pres- 
ident Roosevelt, while he was occupying the post 
of assistant secretary of the navy — of taking the 
action of Spain in dispatching a fleet to Cuban 
waters in 1897 as sufficient cause for a declaration 
of war on the part of the American government — is 
a precedent on which Japan may rightfully interpret 
our dispatching of a fleet to the Pacific 
1897 an d as ample warrant for warlike measures 
1907 on her part. In Francis E. Leupp's nar- 
rative of the career of the President, Mr. 
Roosevelt is quoted as saying, while, as assistant 
secretary, he was dicusing the advance of the Span- 
ish fleet : ''The Cubans have no navy ; therefore the 
squadron cannot be coming to fight the insurgents. 
The only naval power interested in Cuban affairs is 
the United States. Spain is simply forestalling the 
'brush' which she knows, as we do, is coining soon- 
er or later." When asked what he would advise in 
the event that Spain refused to withdraw her orders 
to Admiral Cervera, Mr. Leupp reports Roosevelt 
as replying: "I should send out a squadron to meet 
his on the high seas and smash it. Then I would 
force the fighting from that day to the end of the 
war." 

* * * 

The critics of the administration have clutched 
this morsel of conversation as ample precedent for 
practical war measures on the part of the Japanese 
government the moment our squadron leaves the 
Atlantic for the Pacific. Even the New York Sun, 
usually level-headed and conservative, though one 
of the most diligent inquirers into the motives that 
impel public men, appears to fear that some "young 
jingo assistant secretary of the 
No Chip on navy in Japan""may follow the ex- 
Our Shoulder ample of Roosevelt during his in- 
cumbency of the assistant secre- 
taryship of the navy and assume that the intentions 
of our government in sending a squadron to the Pa- 
cific are warlike. We do not believe that the Sun 
is quite sincere. Nor do we believe that it is try- 
ing to stir up trouble by throwing out a suggestion 
to the Japanese hot bloods. It is getting in another 
of its sly raps at Roosevelt — in which it takes pecu- 
liar delight — by intimating that the President is 
strutting about with a chip on his shoulder. 



The case of 1897 and that of 1907 are not parallel, 
however — not by a long shot. In 1897 Spain began 
making preparations to send a fleet of warships to 
Cuba, then in a state of insurrection, in whose in- 
ternal affairs the United States had exhibited a live- 
ly and perhaps not wholly unwarranted and un- 
natural interest. But let that go. Less than a hun- 
dred miles from American soil lay the harbor of 
Havana, in which some if not all of the vessels of 
the Spanish navy were to lie. Spain did not need 
a navy to enable her to cope with the insurgents, 
whose forces were entirely military. But whether 
she had in mind, at the time of the dispatching of 
her navy, war with the United States or co-opera- 
tion between her land and naval forces cuts no fig- 
ure. The way in which we viewed her act finds no 
parallel in any view that may be taken 1 by Japanese 
statesmen or jingoes. The United 
No Precedent States is not intending to send any 

Exhibited of her warships to Japanese waters, 
nor within a good many miles of 
Japanese waters or Japanese territory. She is plan- 
ning the dispatch of a portion of her navy from one 
point in America to another point in America. If 
Japan takes this as a pretext for a declaration of 
war she will not be acting upon any precedent es- 
tablished by Assistant Secretary Roosevelt; she will 
be establishing a precedent on ber own account. But 
the real authorities in Japan — cutting out the jin- 
goes and common disturbers — have too much sense 
to decry this act on the part of a government which 
for years has been, still is and doubtless for many 
a generation to come will continue to be her best 
friend and well-wisher. What the jingoes, the tin 
soldiers, the anarchists, the Japanese "opposition" 
and the American anti-administration forces say 
does not count. What the responsible heads of gov- 
ernment in the two countries say does count. And 
nothing is doing just yet. 

* * * 

Nothing short of a long term in prison as the 
minimum and the gallows or electric chair as the 
maximum penalty will have any effect upon such 
criminals as those who permitted the rotten Colum- 
bia to carry passengers on the Pacific. The Colum- 
bia had been known to be unsafe for years. With- 
out a water-tight compartment to keep her afloat in 
case of collision at least long enough to permit of 
the launching of all the lifeboats and rafts, her 
employment as a passenger craft has been nothing 
less than criminal. What has happened to the 
Columbia is liable to happen any day to almost 
every other passenger steamer traversing the coast 
of the Pacific. If there is one thoroughly seaworthy 
and safe passenger steamer plying be- 
Take Your tween the ports of the Pacific, with 

Choice the possible exception of the Spokane, 

which is not regularly engaged in this 

traffic, we would like to know her name. The men 



Pacific Outlook 



who ■ ri-k human life in such death traps 

..•■ run of passenger steamers on these 
waters arc. chiefly, the same men who rush their 
victims oxer rotten ties and wornout steel rails, sac- 
rificing everything else for dividends. Coastwise 
traffic >n the Pacific, whether by land or sea, has 
i reduced to a gambling same in which an 
irresponsible gambler, operating a crooked game, is 
protected by rules ami regulations of his own mak- 
ing;. Which kind of death-dealing instrument do 
you prefer — a rotten tie and broken rail, or a flimsy 
minus water-tight compartments, now con- 
sidered an essential to safety in travel by all mari- 
time authorities excepting those of the Harriman 
brand? 

* * * 

During' the Hammersley will contest in New 
York many years ago a woman named Rebecca 
Jones, employed in the Hammersley family as a 
nurse or domestic, was called to the stand to testify. 
Mrs. Hammersley. afterward Duchess of Marlbor- 
ough, knew that if Miss Jones told all that she knew 
her case would fail. Therefore, for some reason. 
Miss Jones refused to open her lips when questions 
were put to her. For this offense she was sen- 
tenced to Ludlow street jail for contempt of court, 
and as the result of her continued refusals to 
testify she remained in the keep for some- 
Silent thing over a year. From that time forth 
Zimmer she was commonly known as "Silent 
Becky" Jones. The case of Vice-Presi- 
dent Zimmer of the Pacific States Telephone Com- 
pany of San Francisco, who refused to testify in 
the trial of Louis Glass, president of that company, 
on trial for having given a bribe, is one of the few 
instances in the annals of American courts in which 
the "Silent Becky" episode has been duplicated. In 
the name of justice it is to be hoped that the 
court will keep Zimmer in jail until he gives his 
testimony, whether the period be one year or ten; 
and that afterward he will be prosecuted for his 
offense in shielding: an accused criminal. 

* * * 

Good for Captain Hance! He has made up his 
mind, unreservedly, that no more warrants shall be 
cashed by him as city treasurer unless they are 
regular in every particular. Hereafter every war- 
rant which is stamped as "irregular" by City Audi- 
tor Mushet will be refused payment. If Captain 
Hance stand firm — and everybody who knows him 
understands that nothing will swerve him from 
what he regards as his duty — and co-operate with 
Mr. Mushet. there will be a crackling and rattling 
in the city hall that should be taken by the grafters 
as a warning to flee. Mr. Mushet and Captain 
Hance are on the right track. They are simply 



doing their duty- hut how few public officials per 
form their duties according to the 

Just Doing letter of the law? Now if the prose- 
Their Duty cuting officers would awaken to the 
fact thai there is work for them to 
do — things that have been done that should be un- 
done — possibly the necessity of appealing to 3 
Spreckels and a Heney would be obviated. The 
people of Los Angeles have looked complacently 
upon the species of minor graft for so long that they 
have become hardened to it. It has been easy to 
fleece the city, taking' just a little at a time, but the 
aggregate is a fortune of no mean proportions. It 
is high time that the citizens of Los Angeles awaken 
to the fact that they have been victims of mean 
little graft, and incidentally to tender a vote of 
thanks to and of confidence in Mr. Mushet and Cap- 
tain Hance. It is too bad that they cannot honestly 
tender similar felicitations to the office of district 
attorney. 

* * * 

While the potato growers of the San Joaquin val- 
ley are making their boasts of a banner season and 
the fanciest prices on record for many years, the 
consumer is raising reasonable objections to the 
sky-high price which he has to pay for this neces- 
sity. Potatoes, like many other products of the soil 
in California, can now be procured at nothing short 
of famine prices. California, loudly heralded as one 
of the most prolific producers of fruit and vege- 
tables in the world, is compelled to pay more for its 
fresh vegetables and fruit than almost any other 

state in the Union. This condition is 

Famine working an irreparable injury to the 

Prices state. California is no longer the poor 

man's state. The rate of wages, though 
high, is more than offset by the high prices of na- 
tive-grown foodstuffs. When potato growers, for 
example, are able to boast that they make three 
hundred dollars per acre, above expenses, on potato 
crops — a profit beyond all reason, considering the 
value of the land devoted to this purpose — there is 
something rotten in Denmark. Between the de- 
mands of the vegetable producers and those of the 
railroads the ordinary wage-earner in this state 
finds himself in hard lines. 

* * * 

It is very possible that we may be treading on 
dangerous ground — at least touching upon a deli- 
cate subject — in offering a suggestion to that great 
and powerful organization which has done so much 
to advance the interests of Los Angeles and South- 
ern California — the Los Angeles Chamber of Com- 
merce. There is little doubt that this notable in-. 
stitution has done more than anv other influence to 






6 



Pacific Outlook 



promote the development of this immediate portion 
of the Southwest. It is 
Work for the but natural, however, that 

Chamber of Commerce the efforts of this great 
body of men, chiefly resi- 
dents of Los Angeles, should have been directed 
largely toward the upbuilding of this city. How 
strongly the present needs of the outlying region 
may appeal to it we do not know. But there is 
that in economic conditions surrounding and vitally 
affecting Los Angeles which merits the serious con- 
sideration of this organizotion. We refer to the 
great necessity — really an imperative duty — of 
adopting measures for the more rapid development 
of the general agricultural resources of the territory 
immediately tributary to this city. 

* * * 

When we consider the wonderful possibilities 
which lay hidden in the fertile soil of Southern Cali- 
fornia and the fact that that most necessary of all 
forms of industry — the production of foodstuffs — 
has been neglected in some particulars, it is little 
short of amazing. The prices of such table neces- 
sities as potatoes, green corn, string beans, green 
pease, cabbage, turnips, cauliflower and other vege- 
tables are probably higher in Los An- 
We Need geles to-day than in almost any other 
More Farms portion of the United States except- 
ing the arid Rocky mountain region. 
The result is that living has become a serious prob- 
lem for the poorer classes. Why should this be so 
in a land so rich in agricultural resources as South- 
ern California? The answer is to be found in the 
tendency of newcomers to locate in the cities — 
most of them in Los Angeles — or to engage in the 
much-advertised orange, lemon or grape culture, 
while the call of the vegetable farming lands is but 
slightly heeded. 

* * * 

There is no doubt that the prosperity of Los An- 
geles and of every other city in Southern California 
would be greatly advanced if the price of living 
were to be reduced ; and one way in which this re- 
duction may be obtained is through the greater de- 
velopment of the general agricultural resources of 
the surrounding country. There is in this section a 
wonderful demand for vegetables and small fruits 
of all kinds. The development of the industry of 
general farming and of gardening has not kept pace 
with urban development. Not 
Bone and Sinew only would more prolific agri- 

of the Land cultural production materially 

reduce the price of living, but 
the greater settlement of the agricultural lands 
would inure to the direct benefit of the metropolis 
of the Southwest. We believe that the necessities 
of the occasion demand that the various promotion 



bodies of the Southwest, including the Chambers of 
Commerce of this and other cities, place especial 
emphasis, in the literature they send broadcast 
throughout the country, upon the need of more 
plain everyday farmers — who, after all, in all coun- 
tries and under all conditions, are the real bone and 
sinew of a people. Los Angeles in particular should 
not let the impression go forth that this is a rich 
man's city. 

* * * 

Our suave fellow-citizen, the Rev. Dr. Ervin S. 
Chapman, chief executive officer of the Anti-Saloon 
league of California, author of the now famous 
"Stainless Flag" address and enemy of the Prohibi- 
tion party, has accidentally slipped a cog and for 
some days has been the subject of a joke which, 
like the spirit of the lamented Mr. Banquo, will not 
vanish. At the weekly luncheon of the City Club 
last Saturday Dr. Chapman was present and ap- 
parently enjoyed the luncheon, including 
A Rum the dessert. And it is in the dessert that 
Joke the joke on Dr. Chapman lies, for the 
dessert was rum punch — not the kind 
that requires a dozen sniffs to determine its charac- 
ter, but the' real thing. And it evidently tasted 
mighty good to Dr. Chapman, too. Now there is 
nothing reprehensible in the eating of a good stiff 
rum punch, under ordinary circumstances. It all 
depends upon who is eating it. A rum punch, 
properly made, should be very convincing evidence 
that there are some forms of the demon that are not 
so vile as total abstainers would have us believe. 

* * * 

AVhy shouldn't Mayor Harper wear a wig, a 
toupee, a periwig, a peruke, a scratch or whatnot? 
Why poke fun at him? Just put yourself in his 
place. Imagine yourself seated in the sanctum dur- 
ing the visits of delegations asking the' mayor to do 
all sorts of things. Think of the breezes created by 
the verbal peregrinations incident to such au- 
diences ! Think of the stiffer drafts created by the 
job hunters who elevated the mayor into office, ac- 
cording to their own confessions ! Even the super- 
heated air wafted about the mayor's 
Hint to the pate during such moments becomes 
Thoughtless chilled to the danger point the mo- 
ment he begins to shake a negative 
with his head. The mayor has learned the danger 
of remaining seated in drafts, and wisely, if the 
newspaper story be true, has decided to offer his 
dome of thought some protection. It is true that 
the Examiner's picture of the mayor and his periwig 
does not indicate that the adornment adds to his 
physical attractions, but newspaper illustrations are 
not always characterized by fidelity. The mayor 
should not be joked about his wig. This paragraph, 
by the way, is not intended as a joke. It is a hint 



Pacific Outlook 



I 



jhtless that they ought t" keep their 

■ he ma\ or and his w ig. 

» •» * 
The unexpected has happened. Frank G. Tyr- 
rell has not been blacklisted by the Times. \t 
least, the fact that a report of It i — address at the 
banquet t" tin- Goldfield miners Monday night was 
printed in the Times the next morning would ap- 
pear to indicate that if his name is tn be placed on 
the black list his punishment is to be deferred for 

some reason, hi accordance with its 

Tyrrell's well-known policy, the Times should 

Good Luck refuse to mention Mr. Tyrrell by name 

on account of the violent attack made 
by him upon that paper at the close of Francis J. 
llenev's famous address in Simpson auditorium 
two or three weeks ago. This is believed to be the 
first time in history that the vindictive policy of 
the Times has been abandoned, for some reason or 
other. Mr. Tyrrell is to be congratulated — possibly. 
Future events will prove whether his victory is 
permanent or not. 

* * * 

Is Los Angeles to have a Chinese "cop"? Such 
an innovation is being seriously considered by the 
police department, and if the police commission 
say "yes" Los Angeles will soon enjoy the distinc- 
tion of being the only city in America whose police 
force numbers among its members a Celestial. The 
idea appears odd at first thought, but it is probably 
a good one. Undoubtedly a faithful, alert Chinese 
policeman would be able to furnish to the police 
department information which would 
Chinese enable the department to forestall much 
"Copper" of the trouble which has afflicted the 
Chinese colony in this city — that is, if 
the Celestial "copper" should be able to keep his 
head, literally speaking. The recent incipient Ton;; 
war has emphasized the need of keeping a close 
watch over proceedings among the Chinese inhabi- 
tants of the city, and a yellow police officer-detec- 
tive seems to be a desideratum. The only trouble 
lies in the laws governing citizenship and in the 
City Charter. It will not be easy to find for this 
post an American citizen wearing a queue. 

* * * 

Many women in California will be affected by the 
recent order sent out from the postoffice depart- 
ment at Washington. According to this latest rul- 
ing women are prohibited from serving in post- 
offices of the first and second class. In all the 
smaller cities of the state women 
Unjust and clerks are engaged in handling the 
Unreasonable mails. Among these clerks the ma- 
jority is composed of faithful work- 
ers who have given years to the service, for the 
clerk in a small town becomes a public institution. 



The injustice of such -weeping discrimination mril 

ie pointed out. 

* * * 

lii delivering the i i prophecy at the Playa del 
Rej Club meeting last week Airs. Lou V, Chapin 

predicted thai there would come a day when women 
would do ;i«-i\ with the silly custom of calling. In 
an age that brought to all active persons more 
duties and more interests than they had time for. 
the speaker declared that the club should become 

a clearing house for social obligations. 
Is the Call She believed that a system of card ex- 
Silly? change could be established and she 

suggested that an "at home," now and 
then, in which a number of women would join in 
receiving their friends, would afford the opportun- 
ity for personal touch. It was pointed out that the 
men could have a part in the reception days and 
thus, with a minimum of time and energy, all ob- 
ligations could be easily met. 

* * * 

While the card clearing house offers a pleasant 
hope of relief from the exacting duty of paying 
formal visits, it has the one objection of serving 
further to eliminate the home as a factor in the life 
of the modern woman. The fashion of calling could 
be superseded without the complicated card clear- 
ing house system. In fact, it is becoming more 
honored in the breach than in the observance each 
year. The mailing of cards is accepted as a com- 
promise in a large share of social debts 

Social and the note of acknowledgement is 

Hypocrisy doing duty on many occasions. In the 
rush of events that mark each day in a 
city, the men and women wdio are in the current of 
life find time for little more than a passing nod in 
place of the oldtime hour of friendly gossip. It is 
necessary to choose from the hundreds the few con- 
genial spirits with whom association means intel- 
lectual stimulus and to resist the temptation to 
know many persons. More and more modern social 
life is becoming a problem of choice, a question of 
nice discrimination in the matter of values. When 
the fact is recognized that only a few friends are 
possible as possessions, the selection of those 
friends will become less of a haphazard process. 
* * * 

One of the famous London clergymen, wdio asked 
his congregation to write their reasons for going 
to church, has had a humiliating experience. Among 
the scores of answers not one gave assurance that 
the good rector's sermons had the drawing power. 
Most of the church members answered that they 
desired to be lifted above the material plane of life, 
but a few exceedingly truthful persons confessed 
that they were controlled. by habit, a desire to show 
their best clothes, fear of public opinion, craving 
for social influence and a wish to escape domestic 



Pacific Outlook 



worries for half a day once a week. In the United 
States it is probable that the replies would have 
been quite different from those brought out in Eng- 
land. Habit rules less sternly than 
Why We Go formerly, there is little fear of public 
to Church opinion except in small towns, the 
social value of church connections 
has diminished and best clothes can be displayed on 
all sorts of weekday occasions. The sermon has 
come to be the thing, in all the Protestant churches 
of this country. Americans who are feeling the re- 
action after generations in which "work" has been 
the watchword now are amusement-mad. They 
must be entertained on Sunday if they have time to 
go to church. Inasmuch as the growing apprecia- 
tion of the uplifting influence of Nature has caused 
the thousands to seek the green fields where the 
tens find the quiet pews, the problem of how to 
hold congregations together has become puzzling 
enough to engage the attention of the preachers 
everywhere. 

* * * 

The fact that the summer months are usually' dull 
and unprofitable as producers of news doubtless ac- 
counts for the fact that one of the morning dailies 
in a recent issue devoted one column to a sensa- 
tional story of the domestic infelicities of a 
nonagenarian, accompanied by a double column cut 
of the subject of the article and his female com- 
panion ; a column and a quarter to the news that a 

well-known evangelist had joined 
Hot Weather the hilarious sect known as the Holy 
and "News" Rollers; and a column or two more 

to sundry sensational items of the 
class which made the Police Gazette notorious. If 
any good end were to be attained by the publication 
of "news" of this class it would be justifiable; but 
when it is put in print and dished up to the public 
in the hope of attracting that class of readers who 
hunger and thirst after salacious literature, it em- 
phasizes the need of newspaper censors. 

* * ¥ 

The time is ripe for reform in the police depart- 
ment of Los Angeles, from the police commission 
down to the ranks. Recent disclosures regarding 
the workings of the department indicate that much 
of the trouble with the force lies in the fact that 
there is not sufficient centralization of responsibility, 
for one thing; and that there is not sufficient dis- 
cipline, for another. With a police de- 
Pclice partment constituted as that of Los An- 
Reform geles is at the present time there is great 
opportunity for the corrupting influence 
of politics in that branch of city government. There 
might be less ground for complaint if the police 
commission were composed not of practical poli- 
ticians, very largely if not exclusively, but of men 



who believe that practical politics and the adminis- 
tration of a police department should be kept as far 
apart as the North Pole is from the South. 

* * * 

For many years Los Angeles has been unfortu- 
nate in that its police department has been domi- 
nated by men whose highest ideals seem to have 
been to strengthen the particular political party to 
whom they owe their appointment. It has been the 
practice of the chief executives to make this office 
a reward for political services rendered the head 
of the city. Mayor Harper followed 
Why It Is in the footsteps of his predecessors 
Corrupt when he made up the present commis- 
sion. And so long as the chief quali- 
fication for membership in this important municipal 
body be the quantity and quality of partisan ser- 
vices rendered, just so long will the department be 
corrupt. The first consideration here as in other 
branches of municipal government should be fitness 
for a trust of this character rather than quality of 
political services rendered to the successful party 
or faction. 

* * * 

The one-man commission idea, especially when 
applied to the police department, has been success- 
ful where tried. Of course much — in fact, every- 
thing — depends upon the character and qualifica- 
tions of the man occupying this post. A police 
force should be under practically military discipline. 
Experience has demonstrated the wisdom of this 
system of control. And inasmuch as no one would 
suggest a dual or triple head for an army, why 
should we tolerate divided responsibility in the head 
of a police department? People are slow, it is true, 
to take up reforms of this nature. 

Centralize Unfortunately they frequently have 
Responsibility to be driven into adopting them as 
the outcome of the flat failure of 
the political system. In Los Angeles we have seen 
how politics has interfered with the proper conduct 
of our police department, and it logically follows 
that the people will demand a change before long. 
It is not at all likely that any change in the method 
of running the police department of this city will 
be undertaken during the present administration, 
but the time will come when a one-man head and 
strict military discipline will be demanded and the 
demand complied with. 

* * * 

Throughout the country the value of log stump- 
age is increasing. The average value per thousand 
feet, board measure, for the United States increased 
from $2.18 in 1900 to $2.59 in 1905, a rise of 41 
cents, or 18.8 per cent. This advance in the cost of 
stumpage added $11,472,115 to the total cost of saw- 
mill material and increased the value of lumber pro- 



Pacific Outlook 



9 



The increase is due not so much to 
a present shortage in the supply of lumber material 

in the country a? a whole as to the fact that the 
available supply of log stumpage is rapidly being 
bought up and withdrawn from the market. The 
conditions in certain of the stales are 
Increased noteworthy. In Maine. New Hamp- 
Cost shire, and Xew York the great demand 

for spruce to be used as a raw material 
in the wood pulp industry has caused an increase 
in stumpage values far above the average increase 
reported for the country as a whole. In Illinois, 
Indiana, and Ohio, where little merchantable timber 
remains, the rise in stumpage values is due directly 
to the growing scarcity of sawmill material for im- 
mediate use. In Kentucky and Tennessee, where 
the supply is still relatively large, the sharp ad- 
vances are due in large part to extensive buying for 
future use. t hi the Pacific slope is still to be found 
the cheapest high-grade stumpage in the country, 
though the values in this region show substantial 
increases over 1900. 

* * * 

In a recent bulletin the Bureau of the Census 
calls attention to the fact that "on the Pacific slope 
is still to be found the cheapest high-grade stump- 
age in the country, though the values in this region 
show substantial increases over 1900." Practically 
all species of merchantable timber have increased 
in stumpage value. Yellow pine, which was the 
species most used at both censuses, increased in 
value per thousand board feet from $1.12 to $1.68. 
White pine increased from $3.66 to $4.62; Douglas 
fir, the chief species converted into lumber in the 
states of Washington and Oregon, from Jj cents to 
$1.05; hemlock, from $2.56 to $3.51 ; oak, from $3.18 
to $3-83 ; spruce, from $2.26 to $3.70 ; and cypress, 
from $1.58 to $3.42. Redwood, found only in Cali- 
fornia, advanced in value from $1.06 to $1.55, or 
46.2 per cent. The increased value of log stumpage 
is reflected in the increased value of the 
Timber products of the lumber camps. Saw logs, 
Values the principal product of the industry, in- 
creased in quantity from 25,279,702 thous- 
and feet in 1900 to 27,980,768 in 1905, a gain of 10.7 
per cent; but they increased in value from $158,880,- 
352 to $210,074,486, a gain of 32.2 per cent. The 
number of railway ties reported increased from 22,- 
524,640 to 36,445,308, or 61.8 per cent; while their 
value increased from $6,277,439 to $12,413,793, or 
97.8 per cent. The average value of a tie rose from 
28 cents in 1900 to 34 cents in 1905. In this con- 
nection it should be noted that the census figures do 
not include ties cut by farmers during the winter 
months and sold directly to the railroads. It should 
also be noted that the figures are for hewn ties. 
Sawed ties are forming an increasing percentage 



of the total production of railwa) ties in the coun- 
try, and they are reported b) the mills in thousand 
feet under the heading of rough lumber. 

* * * 

There is no danger that Los Angeles will ever 
have too much park space. If the city continues to 
grow during the next fifteen or twenty years as she 
has in the past half dozen years, the rising genera- 
tion will bemoan the fact that the founders of the 
Greater Los Angeles did not have the forethought 
to make provision for more breathing and recrea- 
tion spots. While we have a magnificent system of 
parks, it is ample for half a million inhabitants or 
so, but not for the million that are coming. The 

movement for the conversion of the 

Parks for the old abandoned cemetery on Hill 

Million street, near the high school, ought 

to be encouraged. It is an ideal 
park site — high, dry, cool, sightly, accessible to the 
residents of the business district. The property 
may be purchased now at a reasonable figure, but if 
is growing in value and before long will be a costly 
investment. By all means let the city buy the prop- 
erty and convert it into another beauty spot. Dr. 
Robinson, one of the most noted landscape archi- 
tects in the country, will be here next fall to lay 
plans for the beautification of the city. Let's be 
ready to ask him to outline a plan for a park on 
high school hill. 

* * * 

What is commonly known as "newspaper enter- 
prise" among the daily press was beautifully dem- 
onstrated during the session of the National Educa- 
tional Association. For nearly a week representa- 
tives of the Times worried Miss L. L. Whitlock, 
who, as the personal representative of Mr. Hoedel, 
had charge of the lists of registered visitors, with 
their demands that she permit them to make a copy 
of the names for publication. Miss Whitlock had 
received instructions not to allow a copy of the lists 
to be made. All attempts to persuade her to allow 
the lists to be used without a writ- 
Echo of the ten order from the proper authori- 
Convention ty failed. The Times representa- 
tives even went so far as to ofi'er 
her the tidv little sum of five hundred dollars if she 
would violate the trust reposed in her. But she 
stood pat, as any honest person would do. Last 
Wednesday night five men who said they repre- 
sented the Times visited the department under her 
charge and declared that they would not leave until 
she had acceded to their demand that they be per- 
mitted to copy the names. Among them was a 
young woman who jumped upon a chair and. 
springing over the counter, boldly announced that 
she would see the lists, regardless of Miss Whit- 
lock. But she did not. 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



Night was on and Miss Whitlock and her assist- 
ant, tired out as the result of their long period of 
labor, prepared to go home. Calling the janitor of 
the building to her, she placed the care of the cabi- 
nets containing the names in his hands with instruc- 
tions that no one be allowed to copy them. In her 
absence the attack was renewed and every device 
was resorted to in order to get the janitor to con- 
sent to turn over the cabinets.' Finally, worn out 
by the importunities of the Times men, the janitor 

turned the matter over to Victor 
And This Is Hecht. who represented Mr. Hoedel 
"Enterprise!" of the publicity committee, and the 

copies so eagerly desired were se- 
cured. Mr. Hecht is little more than a youth, which 
probably accounts for his weakness in permitting 
the Times people to get at the names. Miss Whit- 
lock was justly enraged and Mr. Hoedel and the 
other members of the publicity committee were sick 
and disgusted — but the Times published the list of 
names the next morning. It was a beautiful vic- 
tory, and the enterprising Times management 
doubtless is still gloating over it. But it lost a neat 
little bunch of subscribers as the result of the devi- 
ous method it adopted to secure the coveted names. 
* * * 
At last the man lay figures in the shop windows 
have asserted their rights to appear in as extreme a 
condition of undress as that permitted of the wom- 
en lay figures so familiar to pedestrians on the 
downtown streets. For many seasons the women 
lay figures have been accustomed shamelessly to 
pose in nightgowns or dressing gowns. They have 
been seen in the fluffiest of lace petticoats and the 
snuggest of corsets. They have even exhibited 
their lace stockings in a manner calculated to bring 
the blush of indignation to the cheek of any self- 
respecting man lay figure which wore the latest 
thing in bargain suits. Even though the weather 
was warm enough to reduce any waxen cheek to a 
liquid state, the men lay figures 
Equal Rights have remained fully attired, but 
for Lay Figures at last they have revolted. They 
have obtained equal rights. 
Now they exhibit themselves clad in their under- 
wear — nothing else. They appear a bit embarrassed 
to be sure, but they will gain confidence. One of 
them has chosen a suit of blue lisle thread. He sits 
in a rather self-conscious attitude and evidently 
is wondering what sort of socks he should select 
to carry out the color scheme he has chosen. Of 
course, he attracts attention, but it is high time he 
had his chance, and a public accustomed to seeing 
women lay figures in all varieties of deshabille soon 
will be come indifferent to the partially clad men 
lay figures. The Pacific Outlook stands for justice, 
and why should not the disgusting and demoraliz- 
ing lay figures have equal rights to shock the in- 
habitants of a city? 



Why Not Speak Out? 

"It is always the business of the church to in- 
struct the conscience,'' says the Interior, a leading 
Presbyterian paper, in an article contributed on the 
subject of child labor by assistant secretary of the 
National Child Labor Committee. This expression 
holds, as to questions of policy either social, politi- 
cal or moral, wherein men may honestly differ as to 
what constitutes correct conduct, or the proper in- 
dividual attitude. But upon the subject of working 
children, as it is discussed, naturally it has a 
stronger bearing. In the one case the church, as 
the writer suggests, does well to "content herself 
with the inculcation of the principles of righteous- 
ness and justice and mere)', leaving the application 
to the individual conscience." In the other case 
there is occasion for plain speaking, for that dnecr. 
personal address of condemnation about which 
there can be no misinterpretation. 

The story of the evil of child labor has repeatedly 
been told in all its detail during the past two or 
three years. It is a tale with which most of us are 
familiar. We have been shocked by its details and 
miserably humiliated by the reflection that with all 
our boasted ability and shrewdness we are not able 
to get on in the world without relying on the en- 
forced help of little hands, and the grinding away 
of young lives. There has been protest, and reform 
— with some correction of the outcry, and propa- 
ganda for national evil here and there. Humanitar- 
ianism has been aroused in the church and out of it ; 
and the result has been preaching and writing until 
the subject has become trite. But the children con- 
tinue to work, and the men who employ them con- 
tinue to reap the unholy profit. 

As the instructor of conscience, has the church, 
as a whole, performed its full duty in the premises? 
When men commit legal offense against society, the 
m-ere general preaching as to their wrongdoing is 
not held to be effective. They are singled out and 
made to understand that society condemns their 
action in an individual sense, and that individual de- 
nouncement must follow. Against the highest pre- 
cepts of the church there can be no graver offense 
than is involved in the employment of children to 
the stunting of their bodies, the dwarfing of their 
intellects and the crushing of their spirits. It is a 
species of slavery that perverts human kind by the 
wholesale, a direct contravention of the injunction 
of the Man of Nazareth: "Of such are the kingdom 
of heaven," and again: "Whoso shall receive one 
such little child in my name receiveth me." 

Why is not this an occasion for plain speaking 
to the man in the church who is guilty of the of- 
fense? asks the Portland Oregonian. Wherein 
should the churchman be more tolerant than the 
layman? When Christ was in the temple on a cer- 
tain memorable occasion he did not preach against 
the evil of the presence of the money changers, but 
he drove them forth with the lash of his scorn. His 
anathema against the hypocrisy of the scribes and 
pharisees was not of vague and general utterance : 
it was hurled with all the divine personal force di- 
rectly at their heads. If the church would consider 
these examples, we predict it would be an immense 
power for good in the struggle against the evil of 
child labor. ' 



Pacific Outlook 



II 



ORIGIN OF MORMON POLYGAMY 



Does the Booh of Mormon Give License for the Barbarous Practice? 



Bv I-! H. Ci-ui.E" 



Mr. Gurlej , native of Wisconsin, united with the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ ol 

Day Saint- in is-;. »;i> ordained priest in 1878 and elder in 1NN1, and the year following with 
■ .in membership in company with the members of his family and others, Mr, Gurley wa 

1 ry work in this church for some time, but found thai he could not accept Joseph 
Smith as pr Aet, He is now a member of the First Christian church (Disciples) of Los 

ys thai he dues ii"t regret his earlier connection with the Mormons, Eor he learned 
much t lint was valuable to him in later life. The article he has written for the Pacific Outlook is in 
of the few authoritative presentations of facts regarding the institution of poly- 
gamy made by fair-minded men who have dissented from the doctrines of the great .Mormon "prophet," 
.lied. — Edit 



Having had access to the inside history of the 
rise ami life of Mormonism from its inception down 
to the death of its prophet, Joseph Smith, and being 
familiar with a number of the "isms" springing out 
of the smash-up at Nauvoo, Ills., especially with the 
"reorganized" church, I am prepared with data, 
statements of fact and references that should settle, 
in my judgment, much of the discussion in regard 
to this subject. 

What is the truth? Many have written pro and 
con, and I regret to say that serious errors evidently 
have appeared, both in dates and in statements of 
fact ; but they are not all on one side. 

The questions are these: Does the Book of Mor- 
mon contain language that gives a license for the 
practice of polygamy? Did Joseph Smith, the Mor- 
mon prophet, authorize by revelation the practice 
of this unchristian and barbarous dogma? What 
does the record say? Before submitting the evi- 
dence, permit me to give a brief outline of the his- 
tory. 

According to the Autobiography of Joseph Smith, 
published in the supplement to the Millenial Star- 
Continuous, you will find in Volume 14 that he was 
born at Sharon, Vermont, December 23, 1805. With 
his parents he removed to Palmyra, New York, in 
181 5, when he was in his tenth year. Some years 
later he removed to Manchester, in the same state. 
Subsequently, however, the county of Ontario, in 
which that town was located, was divided, and the 
new county formed was named Wayne. Palmyra 
is now in Wayne county. 

In this, his own account, he claims to have be- 
come deeply interested in religion at the age of 
fourteen years, and that at the age of fifteen, or in 
the year 1821, there was shown to him a vision of 
"the Father and Son", a second vision is claimed 
for the date of September 21, 1823, when he asserts 
that an angel — "Ncphi," according to the Book of 
Mormon — appeared, and told him of the "plates" 
containing the record known since as the Book of 
Mormon. A third vision is claimed for September 
22, 1827, when the "plates", the "breastplate" and 
"Urim and Thumurim" were delivered to him. 
Joseph claims that he returned all of these items 
back to an angel when the work of translation was 
completed, some two or three years later. A fourth 
vision is claimed for May, 1820, when, as he asserts, 
"John Baptist" ordained him and Oliver Cowdery 
(a man who had joined fortunes with Joseph a short 
time previous) to the "Aaronic" priesthood, with 
great promise fur the future, including the promise 
of their ordination to the Melchisedec priesthood, 



etc. This promise Joseph claimed was afterward 
fulfilled by the presence of Peter, James and John 
April 6, 1830. 

These items and dates represent the status of the 
prophet's claims. Bold? True, they are bold and 
stupendous in magnitude — for a mortal to make the 
claim that he was ordained to the Melchisedec 
priesthood, in particular. 

It surely is apparent, in reading these claims, that 
Joseph Smith's aim was to claim everything in sight 
to be found in Bible lore. In the year 1829, we are 
told, the Book of Mormon was put in manuscript 
form and was printed in the early part of 1830. 
These are the dates gleaned from the history pub- 
lished by the followers of Joseph Smith — of the 
important items of their church foundation. The 
reader is referred further to "Visions of Joseph the 
Seer" and "Synopsis of Faith and Doctrines", pub- 
lished by the reorganized church at Lamoni, De- 
catur county, Iowa. 

David Whitmer, one of the three special witnesses 
to the Book of Mormon, published an "Address" 
before his death. In this he says that in June, 1829, 
Oliver Cowdery, Martin Harris and himself were 
chosen to be the three witnesses, and also that "in 
this month I was baptized, confirmed and ordained 
an elder in the church of Christ by Brother Joseph 
Smith." (See "Address," page 32.) He asserts that 
he was the third elder in the church. Whitmer, one 
of the "three special witnesses", denies that any 
ordination to or claim of the Aaronic priesthood was 
mentioned until years afterward, when Joseph inter- 
polated the terms in his revelations given before and 
placed it in his autobiography. Not only this, but 
no "Urim and Thumurim" was named, or known, 
nor the word "breastplate", until years afterwards, 
when Joseph, having learned of them in the Bible, 
interpolated them to do service for his falsely called 
"Stick of Ephraim". 

Joseph claims to have translated the Book of 
Mormon by the "L'rim and Thumurim" and to have 
given it back to an angel. Whitmer testifies that 
the book was translated by a "stone" — tradition 
says it was a chocolate-colored stone — by him called 
a "seerstone", by others a "peepstone" — clairvoyant- 
like, at best — and this identical stone (by which 
Joseph received, according to David Whitmer, both 
true and false revelations, up to near the close of 
the year 1829) was then given to Oliver Cowdery, 
Possibly Oliver wis the "angel" to whom Joseph 
referred. This stotte revealed the book! 

Whitmer's life for over forty years in Richmond, 
Mo., was vouched for as that of an honest, upright 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



man by leading citizens of that town. Mayor, 
judges, doctors, the postmaster, General Doniphan 
and" others signed the character statement. More 
than that, he was for years regarded as the witness 
. of witnesses for the Book of Mormon by the Re- 
organized Church of Latter Day Saints. They should 
accept his testimony or, better still, throw all over- 
board. His dying testimony, after fifty years spent 
in seeking information, ought to be good as it per- 
tains to facts. One's "faith" is a different thing. 

Whitmer also asserts that the church was organ- 
ized in 1829 and that on the sixth day of April, 1830, 
there were seventy members, three branches (or 
churches, as some call them) and six elders. He 
controverts Joseph Smith on nearly all the import- 
ant items of church history. He charges the evils 
of Mormonism to Joseph Smith, and with very 
strong resemblance to truth. 

That corruption leaked in early there can be no 
reasonable doubt. Unquestionably it was founded 
on deception, and many honest souls were deceived 
by its tremendous claims. 

Let us consider, first : Does the Book of Mormon 
give license for the institution of polygamy among 
its devotees? 

In answer I quote from the Book of Jacob, chap- 
ter two, paragraph six. Note that a part of this 
often has been quoted to prove that the book does 
not give this license, that it is strongly monogamic. 

"For there shall not any man among you have 
save it be one wife; and concubines he shall have 
none ; for I the Lord God delighteth in the chastity 
of women. * * * Wherefore this people shall 
keep my commandments, saith the Lord of Hosts, 
or cursed be the land for their sakes." 

The above sounds very emphatic for monogamy. 
If that were all, their strong argument is sustained. 
A part or all of the above has repeatedly been given 
by a certain class to vindicate their claims, and for 
the book. But notice — "For if I will, saith the Lord 
of Hosts, raise up seed unto me, I will command my 
people ; otherwise they shall hearken unto these 
things." Any one who desires may see for himself 
the book which shows the above quoted words. 

Let us see : On the sixth day of April, 1830, the 
church was told concerning Joseph Smith : "His 
words and commands they should receive as if from 
mine own mouth in all patience and faith." (See 
Lamoin ed. Doctrine and Covenants, section nine- 
teen, paragraph two.) This purports to be a revela- 
tion from God. Joseph Smith stood to this church 
as Moses stood to old Israel. He was as God to 
them — as God's mouthpiece. We see the Book of 
Mormon gives the loophole — the license for its 
prophet to give the command; and if he did, then 
they must accept as seen by revelation in their Book 
of Doctrine and Covenants (section nineteen, para- 
graph two). Otherwise they must break faith with 
him. 

In quoting the Book of Mormon against poly- 
gamy — that is to say a certain part of paragraph six 
— why not continue and quote the part following 
that shows the hole in the wall by which the proph- 
et and people may slip over to the other side? Why 
not give the full contents? I think the day of "rev- 
elation" of some facts has been postponed too long. 
Shall we not ventilate — let in the light of its own 
print? "For if I will raise up seed unto me I will 
command my people," etc. 



Latter Day Saints claim to be his "people" and 
the only "people" with whom God is well pleased. 
Utah claims to be carrying out the law, and its 
Mormons evidently consider themselves as the 
truest exponents of the prophet Joseph Smith. I 
believe it to be wise for the federal government to 
hold them in abeyance. Of the results I am very 
sanguine. Their massacres of the Gentiles are but 
the outgrowth of the "avenge" doctrine and that of 
"cursing their enemies unto the third and fourth 
generation" taught to their leaders by the prophet 
Joseph Smith in the early thirties, both in Ohio — in 
their temple at Kirtland, where also the banking 
swindle was perpetrated — and in Missouri, where 
the "army" sham, with "Zion's banners," etc., came 
to a sudden round-up at Fishing river in June, 1834. 

Second : Did Joseph Smith institute the doctrine 
of polygamy? 

In the Saints' Herald, the organ of the Reorgan- 
ized Church, volume one, number one, Isaac Sheen, 
then its editor, in a leading editorial discussed Jo- 
seph Smith's relation to polygamy as alleged by 
Utah Mormons. Sheen, as an old-time member — at 
least from before Smith's death — stated that the 
prophet had "repented of his connection with the 
doctrine." All of which he could not do but in con- 
sequence of having once been connected with it ; 
and of this Mr. Sheen seemed confident. Sheen 
would not deny Smith's former belief in the doc- 
trine, but evidently hoped that he had been forgiven 
for his connection with it. In the same Herald, as 
seen years ago, a "publishing committee' of the Re- 
organized Church discussed the subject, admitting 
that the prophet Joseph had given the revelation. 
They sought to excuse him from a part of the blame 
by comparing him with the prophet Ezekiel (chap- 
ter fourteen, where the people come to the prophet 
with an idol in their hearts, how they should be an- 
swered, etc. — an allegory). This committee sought 
to show that, in Joseph's case, on this doctrine of 
plural marriage many of the elders at Nauvoo came 
to the prophet and importuned him, having this 
"idol" in their hearts, and hence the prophet Joseph 
answered them according to their conception of the 
verse from Ezekiel. Thus they admitted Joseph's 
complicity and two members of that committee had 
reasons to know that Joseph Smith did teach poly- 
gamy. Another was Austin Cowles, who died at 
or near Pleasanton, Decatur county, Iowa, having 
lived there for years, where he was known as an 
honorable man. I personally knew one of his sons 
and knew of him also. He was a member of the 
High Council (high court) of the Church of Latter 
Day Saints at Nauvoo, Ills. Mr. Cowles testifies — 
and his testimony is a matter of record — that he 
was a member of the High Council referred to, 
which was in council assembled in the autumn of 
1843, when Hyrum Smith, brother of Joseph Smith 
and one of the presidents of the church, being also 
known in church history as a "prophet, seer and, 
revelator" — second only to Joseph Smith — present- 
ed the document as a revelation received by his 
brother Joseph Smith, authorizing the practice of 
polygamy. It was indorsed by a majority of the 
High Council. But Mr. Cowles spurned it, re- 
signed and withdrew from the church, as also the 
Laws and Higbees had done before him. 

I subjoin the affidavit of Ebenezer Robinson and 
his wife, who also lived near Pleasanton, Iowa, for 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



mair. I'hey ami the others cited were men 

~ who never accepted the dogma, yet 
their lives were given, with one exception, to the 
cause of the Reorganized church. Not one of them 
accepted Utahism, ami they were never impeached, 
though there was ample opportunity for the test be- 
fore their death. No attempt was ever made within 
the church to punish them, for they were known to 
be true men. The Robinson affidavit follows. It 
is taken from the "Biographical and Historical Rec- 
ord of Ringold anil Decatur Counties, Iowa," pub- 
lished in 1887 by the Lewis Publishing Company of 
Chicago: 

"To Whom it may Concern : We, Ebenezer Rob- 
inson and Angeline E. Robinson, husband and wife, 
hereby certify that in the fall if 1S43 Hyrum Smith, 
brother of Joseph Smith, came to our house in Nau- 
voo, Ills., and taught us the doctrine of polygamy. 
And I, the said Ebenezer Robinson, hereby further 
state that' he gave me special instructions how I 
could manage the matter so as to not have it known 
to the public. He also told us that while he had 
heretofore opposed the doctrine, he was wrong, and 
his brother Joseph was right, referring to his teach- 
ing it. (Signed) Ebenezer Robinson. Angeline E. 
Robinson. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 29th day 
of December, 1873. J. M. Sallee, Notary Public." 

I met Mr. Sallee some years afterwards. He was 
then and at last accounts an attorney at law at 
Bethany, Mo. More facts might be presented, but 
I believe these to be ample. I believe that in jus- 
tice there can be but one verdict in the case, how- 
ever much Brigham Young may have enlarged the 
original order. 

* * * 

Most Important Consideration 

The experts who report unfavorably on the results 
of municipal ownership of public utilities abroad 
confine their attention to the economic aspects of 
the subject, says the Sacramento Bee. They say 
nothing of the freedom of municipal government, 
under public ownership, from the graft and corrup- 
tion that disgrace American cities and undermine 
the foundations of democracy. This is the most im- 
portant of all considerations. But on the purely 
economic or business side of the question, there is 
strong testimony in favor of municipal ownership. 
Such publicists as Professor Parsons, of Boston, a 
lifelong student of the subject, are convinced that it 
is successful in British cities, from every point of 
view. And the weight of official testimony is on 
that side of the scales. 

* * * 



SK 



imming a 



Rive 



Skimming a river for a living may be said to be 
one of the most striking examples of the utilization 
of waste. This is done in Paris. There is one in- 
dividual, at least, in the French capital who makes 
it his daily business to skim the Seine. He is out 
at early morning in an old flat bottomed boat, 
armed with a skimming pan. With this he skims 
off the surface of the river the grease which collects 
there during the night* and which he disposes of to 
a soap factory. Generally he makes a quarter or so 
by his morning's work, which enables him to live. — 
Chicago Tribune. 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yourself. 



Tftae G@iatlestaeEa i> s Taaloff 
314 WEST TH1RB STREET 




Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 

prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 

Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



Dills Best for Boodle 

Here is a new phase of the paper money question : 

The banks of San Francisco had for a year or 
more been mystified by an unprecedented demand 
for currency. The people of California have always 
eschewed Uncle Sam's notes and have insisted on 
the heft and ring of coin. So when calls came on 
the cashiers for thousands and thousands in bills 
the demand was without explanation. 

The currency that reaches the Pacific coast is 
such as travellers bring out with them from the East- 
ern States. The banks make a practice of gather- 
ing it up for the accommodation of customers about 
to travel or who wish to forward remittances in the 
mail's. When this great demand suddenly arose 
cashiers were puzzled to meet it. 

The revelations made before San Francisco's 
grand jury as a result of the work of Heney and 
Burns have furnished the solution of the mystery. 

"Bring me the money in currency," was the com- 
mand of Boss Ruef to the bribe givers. 

The grafting to which Ruef has confessed 
amounted to about $1,000,000 within a year, and in 
the light of his testimony the drain on the banks is 
easily explained. Ruef invariably insisted that the 
boodle money should be paper. 

There would be no jingling, no metallic sound to 
betray; he handled very large sums, much larger 
than a man could carry in gold. The boss was cau- 
tion itself. 

Mayor Schmitz does not seem to have appre- 
ciated the virtues of paper money for the silent 
work of the boodler. Under his bed in his Fillmore 
street home he had a box constructed in the floor in 
which to conceal his wealth. He lined it with plush 
so that gold might be deposited noiselessly. The 
precaution was needless, however, for Ruef, who 
always attended to collections, was careful to insist 
on currency. 

The mayor vacated the Fillmore street house for 
the mansion that he built in Vallejo street. In the 
rush of his activities he neglected to remove the 
box from the floor. Detective Burns found it there, 
having been directed by Ruef in a confession. 

Ruef's caution did assist to some degree in his 
downfall, however. The boodle in the trolley deal, 
a total of $400,000, was passed in two payments of 
$200,000 each. All the available supply of currency 
in San Francisco was exhausted each time. It was 
necessary to use thousands of bills of small de- 
nominations. 

The supervisors in their confessions all declared 
that the money came to them in heaps of small pa- 
per money. The circumstance that the railway 
company had clamored for currency and had re- 
ceived large quantities of small bills was an im- 
portant link for the prosecutors. 

But on the whole noiseless paper money helped 
the San Francisco boodlers in the secrecy of their 
crimes. It is not to be inferred that they would 
have shunned gold, silver, copper or anything in 
fact, according to the testimony that has been given, 
but the fact remains that currency is a convenience 
to the boodler. 

* * * 

He — So they got married and went off in their 
new motor car. She— And where did they spend 
their honeymoon? He— In the hospital.— London 
Tit-Bits. 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at. Reduced 
Rates - 

140 S. BROADWAY 



Main 19 



Get. a City Map Free Home Ex. 1 9 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



INCUBATORS AND BROODERS 

Poultry Supplies, Seeds, Garden Tools, Lawn Mowers, Etc. 
Pacific Incubator Co. 



707 South Spring St,. 



Pho 



I Main 5631 
I F 7085 



You Have a Mind 
of Your Own . . . 



When you once make up your mind that 
you want a certain article advertised in the 
PACIFIC OUTLOOK and you decide to 
buy it, do not be sidetracked by any "Just 
as Good" talk that may be given you. First 
class dealers give you what you ask for. 

The PACIFIC OUTLOOK accepts only 
the advertisements of reliable firms — buy of 
them and prove by your own experience 
that the article advertised is what the re- 
putable merchant claims. BUY ADVER- 
TISED GOODS— BUY OF THE ADVER- 
TISER. 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



SCIENCE AND THE FUTURE LITE 



Dr. James II. Hyslop, j professor of 

and ethics at Columbia I'niverSity. has been the 
center of interest this week among the men and 
women who have the courage to think along lines 
that would have startled students of the last qua 
century. 1 >r. Hysli stands at the head of a 

new movement for the scientific investigation of 
psychic phenomena and he is lecturing in the West 
in order that he may interest "people more read) to 
listen than those who are shut in by the traditions 
immunities" in the American Institute for 
Scientific Research. For more than twenty years 
he was associated with the American Branch of the 
Socii Psychical Research and was known as 

the most skeptical of all the distinguished men who 
wen I in investigating the various manifes- 

tations of abnormal and super normal mentality. 
He began his inquiries, he explained to li is au- 
diences, because as a professor in a great universit} . 
he was again and again brought face to face "with 
the demand for scientific proof of the immortality 
be soul. Reared a Calvinist his college studies 
caused him to evolve into a materialist, a disciple 
i f Herbert Spencer. It was to be expected, there- 
fore, that at first he would show little more than 
mild curiosity concerning the experiments con- 
ducted by the society which has collected an enor- 
mous library of records. 

After twenty years of study and investigation 
Dr. Hyslop now announces that he has obtained 
what he considers scientific proof of the existence 
of the spirit after death. The survival of personality, 
he believes, lias been satisfactorily demonstrated by 
means of hundreds of experimnts. So thoroughly 
convinced is this well known scholar that he has re- 
linquished his chair at Columbia and has prepared 
to devote the remainder of his life to the collection 
of data and to the establishment of an organization 
which shall command the respectful attention of the 
whole world. 

While he disclaims all belief in the commonly 
known spiritualistic demonstrations, even though 
he thinks ten per cent of the commercial mediums 
may be honest. Dr. Hyslop announces that he has 
absolute faith in the reliability of the evidence of 
' existence after death. He is careful to avoid the 
use of the word "immortality" because his experi- 
ments have proved, so far, only that the spirit does 
exist (not that it exists forever), that it retains 
memories of life and that it can send messages to 
those wdio still belong to the material world. 

The experiments of Dr. Hyslop and his associates 
in these psychical tests have been made with the 
assistance of trance mediums, whose messages have 
keen given by writing under what is commonly 
caller! spirit control. All these mediums are inter- 
ested in the Society for Psychical Research and 
none belongs to the commercial class. With the 
exception of Mrs. Piper, all are known to the public 
by names assumed to conceal the true personality. 
Most of these mediums are persons of culture and 
intelligence who are glad to give their services in 
the cause of science. 

In describing certain messages that appeared to 
bear most conclusive evidence of identity. Dr. Hys- 
lop explained that what are known as "controls" 



among spiritualists an called "communicators"' by 

dentists. I hese i ommunicators appear to have 

the power of taking on conditions quite as abnormal 

when compared to their condition in the Spiritual 

work as i- the trailer condition to those who belong 

to the material world. All messages, therefore, 
came through two mediums. While it has been easy 
to obtain quick answers to questions, it is always 
difficult to obtain answers that depend upon a con- 
scious effort of memory or upon a change from the 
subject first introduced. 

While most of the examples cited by Dr. Hyslop 
are not more unusual than those familiar to the 
public, those relating to Dr. Richard Hodgson have 
a peculiar interest. Dr. Hodgson who was for 
twenty \ ears secretary and treasurer of the American 
Branch of the Society of Psychical Research, was 
l he intimate friend of Dr. Hyslop. He was about 
the same age. Born in Australia he was graduated 
from Cambridge University after taking his LL.D. 
degree front Melbourne University. He became a 
lecturer at Cambridge on Herbert Spencer's philos- 
ophy and in 1882 first interested himself in the Eng- 
lish Society for Psychical Research. Coming to 
America in 1887 he identified himself with the 
American branch of the parent organization. Less 
conservative than his associate, Dr. Hyslop, he 
published many records in which he set forth as- 
tonishing facts concerning the unseen world. He 
and Dr. Hyslop often jestingly promised to com- 
municate with each other and tQ be scientifically 
precise in sending messages, but there was no defin- 
ite pledge that the man who died first should seek 
to give incontrovertible proof to the other. Dr. 
Hodgson died suddenly last December. From the 
day after the passing of his spirit. Dr. Hyslop de- 
clares that Dr. Hodgson- began to send messages 
which could not be misunderstood by those wdio 
had known the distinguished investigator. All the 
written conversations have revealed that Dr. Hodg- 
son was trying to furnish just the sort of proof his 
confreres had sought so faithfully. 

One peculiar thing about these messages is that 
Dr. Hodgson has not attempted to throw any light 
upon conditions in the spirit world. He has pur- 
sued the one aim — to convince his friends that they 
are in communication with him. In one of his mes- 
sages he referred to his death and mentioned the 
sensation of passing through the "cool ether" but he 
has added almost nothing to the mass of descrip- 
tions more or less vague and incomprehensible long 
Spread on the records of the Society for Psvchical 
Research. 

Believers in reincarnation can derive little com- 
fort from Dr.Hyslop who declares that nothing tend- 
ing to prove the frequent incarnation of spirits has 
been discovered by these investigations. Xot with- 
standing the extraordinary nature of the "proofs" 
presented by Dr. Hyslop, it is evident that he still 
maintains the attitude of the scientific inquirer after 
truth. He is most careful in all his statements and 
dei lines to mention his own theories. The Ameri- 
can Institute for Scientific Research, which he is 
now laboring to establish, will be conducted on the 
broadest lines. Tt is desired that members be ob- 
tained from every part of the country. Psychical 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



phenomena will be accepted in the same manner as 
wireless telegraphy, or any other wonder of the 
twentieth century.' It may be that the day is not 
far distant when telepathy, and the transmission of 
messages from the unseen world will be conducted 
according to formulated rules that are generally un- 
derstood. The spirogram may be, by and by, not 
more wonderful than the cablegram or the marcom- 
gram of today. 

* * * 
The "Why of the Servant Problem 

Why is the gulf between the "lady of the house" 
— not infrequently the man of the house — and the 
domestic helper widening? Why, in America, of 
all countries, and on the Democratic Pacific coast 
in particular, should this gulf become wider and 
deeper until the sole intercourse between mistress 
and servant is the giving of orders in a distant and 
haughty manner? 

Out on Boyle Heights, in a family whose head 
spends the major portion of his time in making loud 
protestations of Christian virtues, including the 
great virtues of humility and brotherly love, em- 
ployment was given a few weeks ago to a young- 
woman from another state who had been compelled, 
partly on account of ill health and partly on account 
of the depleted condition of the family treasury, to 
provide for her own living in a genial climate. The 
long, fervent prayers, the long grace before meals, 
the general sanctimoniousness of the head of the 
family, aroused suspicion on the part of the "help" 
from the beginning. Little by little the demeanor 
of the at first whole-souled head of the house 
changed until finally his manner became so utterly 
overbearing and the demands of the holier-than- 
thou household so heavy that the young woman, 
broken in health and spirit, felt that self-preserva- 
tion required that she seek another field of labor. 
But just as she was about to announce her deter- 
mination the wife, at the instigation of the real head 
of the house, indicated to her that her services were 
no longer required. The family would have to find 
someone who would be willing to get up ever}' 
morning at five or five-fifteen and work until eight 
or eight-thirty at night without lagging. 

This is probably an exceptional case. In this in- 
stance the barrier was erected by the husband ; as 
a rule the wife is the housekeeper and responsible. 
Ignorance, prejudice, heartlessness, inhumanity, 
witlessness and class distinction made the relations 
between the employer and the employe intolerable. 



The dictatorial husband, usurping, in part, the func- 
tions of the wife, became responsible for the breach. 
Presuming that the employe was a natural-born 
menial, because of his inability to distinguish be- 
tween a well-bred person and one of his own class, 
he imposed upon her to the extreme limit of en- 
durance. But like most persons of his class if he 
had known that the young woman who had pre- 
pared his breakfast, washed the dishes, swept the 
floors, made the beds, performed the laundry work 
of the entire household, meantime acting as nurse 
for his offspring, was not born and bred to "service" 
but was the granddaughter of an Irish lord of an- 
cient lineage and of an English countess, that she 
was the possessor of two degrees from an American 
university, that three or four years ago she was one 
of the most sought-after, courted and feted society 
leaders in a Northern city, that her family connec- 
tions are among the most exclusive, and that with- 
in a few weeks she will come into the possession 
of an ample fortune and will once more take the 
place in society to which her lineage and breeding 
entitle her, the chances are that he will wish he had 
fallen down stairs and broken his neck before he 
allowed himself to act the cad: 

This is a true story, and the moral thereof is ob- 
vious. Is it any wonder that young women of in- 
telligence prefer the bargain counter to the kitchen? 
Is it any wonder that we have an everlasting "ser- 
vant problem"? 

* * * 
Labor's New Home 

Few residents of Los Angeles probably know that 
the united trades unions of this city are erecting a 
building to be known as a Labor Temple in this 
city, one of a very few institutions of the kind in 
America. The structure will stand on Maple ave- 
nue, will be seven stories in height and will cover a 
■ground space eighty by one hundred and twenty- 
five feet. One of the chief purposes of the unions 
has been to produce a building which would render 
local labor organizations independent of outsiders 
in the matter of halls and lodge rooms, to give the 
individual members all the advantages of a well- 
equipped club and so to combine these interests as 
to constitute a permanent, secure and profitable in- 
vestment. The building, with the land on which it 
stands, will represent an outlay of about $200,000. 

* * * 

"Did I tell you the story of the old church bell?" 
"No. Let's hear it." "Sorry, but it can be tolled 
only on Sunday." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 




Pacific Outlook 



A California Apiary 

"I have owned and a hec ranch in Cali- 

■■ something like twelve years now," said 
of Los Angeles county in an in- 
terview with the New York Sun. 

"For a California bee ranch of the present clay 
my ranch is rather small. ;is there ;tre on!) between 
five and >i\ hundred hives. It is at the foot of the 
Sierra Ma. Ire Mountains and at the head of a beauti- 
ful gorge. Their principal flower, or pasture, as we 
it, i- the Rock) Mountain sage, the flower of 
which imparts a delicious flavor to the honey, which 
rivals the still famous product of Hymettus ami the 
heather honey of So. itland. 

"The general climate of Los Angeles county in- 
sures a bee pasture all the year, for when the sage 
is not in bloom there are plenty of other honey pro- 
ducing flowers to he had. Years ago when I was 
quite a little child. I can remember that to get honey 
from the comb it was necessary to crush the comb 
ami strain the honey. Of course we do better than 
-.hat now. Such a process now would be con- 
sidered not only a troublesome way of getting; the 
honey, hut it would require so Ion- for the bees to 
rebuild their combs. To build comb the bees must 
first eat honey, and to make one pound of comb 
they must consume about ten of honey. 

"To save the bees this trouble and ourselves the 
loss of the honey sheets of stamped paraffin are 
slipped into the frames of the hives. ( )n these sheets 
the bees build the cells and fill them with honey. 
Tf they detect the cheat they are too busv to waste 
time in protest. 

"When the cells are filled and the bees excluded 
the frames are removed from the hive and put in a 
centrifugal extractor. From this the extracted 
honey runs into a large iron tank, from which it 
is drawn into sixty pound cans and is then ready for 
shipment. My extractors are run by water power, 
which is not only a great saving of labor, but much 
more rapid and surer. 

"1 use flat top hives with frames or drawers ex- 
clusively, and while they are not nearly so pic- 
turesque as the old beegums they are more humane 
and produce many times n'tore honey. In the old 
beegums a half and sometimes more of the bees 
would be killed in getting the honey, and it was al- 
most impossible to take the honey without leaving 
a taste of smoke or carbolic acid. In the up to date 
hives you have only to insert your bee escape or ex- 
cluder, wait for the bees to go in the lower part of 
the hive and then remove your filled drawer. 

"The old way of preventing new swarms from 
taking Hight was to beat tin pans, blow horns and 
raise all manner of a racket, the real object of which 
was to drown the voice of the queen. Now the way 
is to secure the queen in a little wire cage. There 
is not the slightest danger of not knowing royalty 
among bees. Once beheld, the queen bee can never 
he mistaken for either of her plebian subjects, the 
drone or the worker. Not only is she far more ele- 
gant in shape and brilliant in coloring, but she has 
the distinctive habit of crossing the tips of her 
wings. It always reminds me of the helpless mah- 
nii which some women have of disposing of their 
hands. 

"i >f late years a great deal has been done in Cali- 
fornia in the way of improving the breed of bees by 
a judicious system .if crossing, an. I selected queens 



By Mary Elizabeth Pai i I ;aret 

Warriner I 

THE WILD FLOWERS 

OF CALIFORNIA 

NEW KIM in i\ JUST i lUT, 
The final authority on every known wild flower 
of the State. Entire new edition, made necessary 
through the loss of the original plates in the San 
Francisco disaster. A number of new Bowers have 
been adder! and the nomenclature brought up to 
date. Price $2 net. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 
The Big Book Store 252 S. Spring St,. 



Summer Prices 

IN 

Table 
Silverware 



We need the room for our fall stock and offer both 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 




"We are PracticB 


Walchmahers - 


1 


Tou See Us 1 







BRIGDEN m PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 



f 



Established 188? 



/V 



IJA. 



onradi 



Elegant new stocK of Diamonds 
Jewelry and Watches 



Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C. H. Heard 

S. CONRADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles. Cal. 



ARTS AND 


CRAFTS SHOP 


MRS. 


C. D. WESTON 


Hand Painted China 




Hammered Metais 


Home Phone E 3345 


Burnt and Modeled Leather 


34^7 S- Broadway 



Bl^amma^H©5r Infealatori^aBBa 

BULLING'S METHOD OF MUNICH for the treatment of diseases of the 
air passaees-CATARRH. BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our Inhalatorium should be made bj all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send forbooklet 

409 Pacific Electric Bldg'. Phone F-1467 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



have been imported from Europe. This has in- 
creased the yield of honey to a considerable extent, 
and it is said by some bee keepers that in time it 
will produce stingless bees. I am not at all sure 
that I would remove the sting from the little in- 
sects. It is their only weapon of defence, and when 
one remembers that the use of it costs them their 
lives it doesn't seem fair to rob them of it. 

"As to the yield of a hive it is hard to make any 
definite statement. I believe for a summer's prod- 
uct a hive may be counted on to produce between 
seventy-five and iop pounds of honey. In such a 
climate as we have there are many instances where 
a single Italian swarm has produced a thousand 
pounds of first class honey in a season. Although 
the yield of honey in California is enormous, and 
every year increasing, there is always a steady de- 
mand at a good price. It seems, strange, yet in 
spite of the fact that honey sells at a low price, 
there is an artificial product on the market. It is in 
what appears to any but an expert genuine honey- 
comb and is made of sugar and glucose. I have had 
many persons here in the East tell me that they 
were sure of the genuineness of their honey because 
they bought only that in the comb. Having seen 
and tested the artificial honey, I knew how impos- 
sible it was for them to be sure they were getting 
the pure article. 

"As an occupation I know of nothing that has 
the charm of beekeeping. The labor is light and 
pleasant. When one considers that to produce 
honey flowers or some honey producing grain is 
necessary it seems to me surprising that more wom- 
en in the Eastern States do not take it up as a busi- 
ness. I have two school friends in Pennsylvania 
who on paying me a visit became converted to the 
business of beekeeping and now make additions to 
their yearly incomes by the sale of their honey. 

"They both began with a few swarms bought 
somewhere near their homes and I supplied the 
queens. Of course the yield of their hives is noth- 
ing compared with mine in California, neither is 
their season as long, but they make enough to pay 
them for their trouble. As both of them are women 
with artistic taste they have planted pasture , for 
their bees in such a way that their homes are now 
remarkable for their beauty as well as for the ex- 
cellence of the honey." 

* * * 

Pat Tells the Biggest One 

An Englishman, .an Irishman, and a Scotchman 
were one day arguing as to which of the three coun- 
tries possessed the fastest trains. 

"Well," said the Englishman, "I've been in one 
of our trains, and the telegraph poles have been like 
a hedge." 

"I've seen the milestones appear like tomb- 
stones." said the Scot. 

"Be jabers!" said Pat, "I was one day in a train 
in my counthry, and we passed a field of turnips 
and a field of carrots, also a field of cabbage and 
parsley, then a pond of water, and we were going 
that quick I thought it was broth!" 



The L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 


("WYitjng in SigHt) 








|j^lll|l|iy§g 


SI 




3§B§pggg^!^g{ 




y^^^^^^^By 




Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue Free 


L.. ®. M. Alexander (EL. Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 


131 South Broadway. Los Angeles. Cal. 


Phones Home 1906-Main 5959 




BETWEEN 



..California^" East.. 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 



'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Sajt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at 60f South Spring St. 




Arizona Turquoise Mines Co. 

CAN SHOW YOU THE LARGEST 
VARIETY OF COLORING IN TUR- 
QUOISE—THE ONLY STONE THAT 
IS HARD ENOUGH TO WEAR. 

Cutting' WorKs and Sales Room 

450}^ SOUTH BROADWAY 

Wholesale and Retail 



Anxious Mother — I hope you are not thinking of 
marrying young Clarkson. He spends every cent 
he earns. Pretty Daughter — Oh,, well, he doesn't 
earn very much. — Chicago Daily News. 



BOOKSBOUGHT 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1855 



Pacific Outlook 



19 



Americanization of Europe 

In :< letter to thi ->U dated Geneva, 

and. July 4. Lanier Bartletl writ 

"I cannot refrain from noting what a d< 
impression this day here in Geneva has made upon 
me. Verily the "American of the t"iirist 

1- a thing to marvel at. I have 
been impressed by this all through Italy, and in 
Veni nfed t<> me that in St. Mark's Square 

and it.- cafes and along the Grand Canal one saw 
more Americans than natives, and heard the 
Iish language spoken more than the Italian. Every- 
where the servants and shopkeepers speak English, 
ndition which has been . ent irel) 

by the American influx. In Naples the street 
ins shout after you. 'Twenty-three! Skidoo!' 
and the newspapers follow vol) with every variety 
of American publica 

"But here m Geneva this condition is more strik- 
ing even than elsewhere. Tonight this charming 
city is passing through the throes of a typical Fourth 
of July 'wind-up.' As I write, the crackle of fire- 
crackers and the thud of bombs disturbs the usual 
peace of the lakeside, and the beautiful Lac Leman 
reflects the glow and glare of rockets and colored 
lights issuing from the city proper and answered 
from the opposite shore, where the larger hotels sit 
comfortabl) among their gardens. All day the Stars 
and Stripes waved from the flagpoles and balconies 
of these fashionable tourist homes, and tonight the 
Grand Hotel National, the largest of these estab- 
lishment-, i- mjfking a Fourth of July splurge that 
would he huTjjno surpass in any American city. The 
whole front of the great house is aglow, each story 
outlined in red. white and blue lights, while the 
splendid garden that extends down to the lakeside 
promenade is a fairyland of gay lanterns and elec- 
tric streamers. Up to the very tops of the tallest 
trees extend the patterns of light, and the red-fire 
that is constantly burning illuminates groups of 
magnificently-gowned women and well-groomed 
men. almost all with American flag bqutonnieres, 
strolling or sipping coffee beneath the arbor-like 
chestnuts. Within, a grand ball is in progress, at- 
tended by the best people of the city, both Ameri- 
can and European, and the orchestra makes the 
dancers all stand by every now and then while it 
breaks into some patriotic or characteristic Ameri- 
can air. ( hit on the boulevard between the garden 
and the lake a crowd of townspeople is gathered to 
cheer on the fireworks and the noise of the good old 
IT. S. A. 

"At dinner a special Independence Day menu was 
served, with the dining hall decorated in American 
bunting, the dishes of the various courses decked 
with tiny flags and the orchestra delivering nothing 
but American 'tunes.' The elaborate menu cards 
bore a reproduction of 'The Spirit of '76.' which, by 
the way. is the same design used this Fourth by the 
Savoy Hotel. London. Even the never-to-be-for- 
gotten crackle of the peculiar little firecracker so 
beloved by all Uncle Sam'- younger nephews was 
borne conspicuously on the wind earlier in the dav. 
As we steamed up the lake for Chillon in the morn- 
ing, puffs of smoke followed by brittle cracklings 
several times attracted attention to small boys of 
unmistakable LI, S. origin, celebrating in rowboats 
after a fashion which they were prohibited from 
practicing in the well-ordered streets of the Swiss 
city." 



yj*ifflMMMIf MMUtli ■ - 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses . 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach Both 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want the BEST 

^ ^ KODAK FINISHING 

...GO TO... 

PIERCE ®, CO. 127 W. 6th St, 



£8e (gUibiforium Q0df6 anb Coifef (parfore 

— ^ — ■ I- ■ Ladies and Gentlemen ^™«^^^^^^^^^^^ 

900 AUDITORIUM BUILING 

FIFTH AND OLIVE STS. 



Telephone Home F 5024 



MRS. L. PENNRICH 



20 



Pacific Outlook 




Mrs. Hancock Banking 



Portrait by Joseph Greenbaum 



Pacific Outlook 



21 




SOCIETY 



Unique Club Entertainment 

No more generous or more graceful hospitality 
has been extended this year than that which was 
enjoyed last week by the three hundred women who 
wore the guests of the Crescent Bay Club of Playa 
del Rey. Special cars on the balloon route carried 
the guests to the beaches, making slops at Holly- 
wood and < Icean Park, where delegations wire wait- 
ing to greet the visitors. At Ocean Park badges of 
big tish scales were pinned upon the members of 
the party, which was made up of representatives of 
the various Los Angeles clubs. At Playa del Rc\ 
the upper pavilion was reserved for the club women. 
This was gaily decorated with flags and here were 
spread the Mower decked tables. After the luncheon 
responses to many toasts were given with Mrs. 
Force Parker acting as toastmistress. Mrs. Parker 
was introduced by Mrs. Egclhoff-Rundel. president 
of the Crescent Bay Club. The toasts were in the 
form of an old fashioned commencement programme 
and the responses were made with ready wit ami 
more or less mock misdom. Mrs. Egelhoff-Rundel 
had the salutatory, Mrs. Ben Hunter of the Santa 
Monica Woman's Club presented the class history 
and Miss Laura Gordon Smith of the Friday Morn- 
ing Club told what she knew of "The Club Women 
of Los Angeles". Miss Smith made a polished little 
speech in which she paid high tribute to the club 
women of Southern California, adding to her serious 
appreciation of high achievement several witty 
stories that pointed a club moral. Mrs. Hite Wicki- 
zer gave a humorous reading which was a clever 
piece of character acting and was twice recalled to 
the platform. Mrs. R. J. Waters, acting president 
of the Los Angeles district of the California Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs, made a hit by her berib- 
boned essay on "All Little Fish Expect to be Big- 
Whales". Mrs. Lou V. Chapin was optimistic in 
her class prophecy and Mrs. Will Anderson de- 
livered the valedictory. The boats and baths were 
turned over to the guests who enjoyed an outing- 
long to be remembered. 




Mr. Conger's Daughter Arrives 

Captain and Mrs. Frederick A. Buchan arrived 
in Pasadena last Saturday From Zamboanga, Philip- 
pine Islands. Mrs. Buchan is the only daughter of 
the late Edwin Hurd Conger, who was United 
States minister to China at the time of the Boxer 
uprising. When Mr. Conger died last May, Cap- 
tain and Mrs. Buchan with their little daughter 
started for California. Zamboanga, at which place 
Captain Buchan is stationed as judge-advocate of 
the Department of Mindanao, i s six hundred miles 
south of Manila and the journey to Pasadena lias 
been a continuous one since May 24. Mrs. Buchan 
will pass several months with her mother at the 
Conger home. She is a young woman of more ihan 
ordinary beauty. During the siege of Pekin she 
was at the American legation with her parents. 
She met Captain Buchan for the first time when. 



with the .Sixth United States Cavalry, he went to 
the rescue of the legation prisoners. 

Friend of the Blind 
Mrs. Frances Fearn, widow of the former United 
States Ambassador to Greece, passed the week in 
I os Angeles. Mrs. Fearn, wdio made her headquar- 
ters at the Hotel Alexandria, has come to the Pa- 
cific coast on a mission. She is interested in the 
work of improving conditions for the blind and is 
devoting her life to the task of assisting her long- 
time friend, Queen Elizabeth of Roumania, the 
much-loved Carmen Sylva, in the great philan- 




Miss Estelle Cathrine Heartt 
Los Angeles singer who is at Idyllwild 

thropy which has its center at Vatro Luminoso, the 
City for the Blind, established by the queen and 
supported principally from her majesty's private 
income. At Vatro Luminoso families are kept to- 
gether and blind children are taught the useful arts. 
Mrs. Fearn does not attempt to establish new meth- 
ods of treatment. It is her desire to aid institution, 
in the various cities of the world and to tell of vari- 
ous reforms and advanced experiments that ha\e 
proved successful. She is a fascinating speaker and 
will deliver one lecture in Los Angeles. In Berke- 
ley and Palo Alto sin awakened much interest when 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



she spoke on several occasions. Her lectures are 
illustrated with views from the Roumanian City 
of the Blind. 



Two Engagements 

The tea given last Saturday afternoon by Miss 
Grace Melius in honor of her house guest, Miss 
Ethel Shorb of San Francisco, brought out many 
society leaders who are still in the city. In the re- 
ceiving line with the two young women were Mrs. 
J. J. Melius, Mrs. B. C. Whiting and Miss Katherine 
Melius. The following assisted in entertaining: 
Mrs. A. J. Howard, Mrs. E. Avery McCarthy, Mrs. 
Randolph H. Miner. Mrs. W. W. Norris, Mrs. Jaro 
Von Schmidt, Mrs. J. H. Browne, Mrs. Leo Chand- 
ler, Mrs. Harry L. Bixby, Mrs. R. P. Sherman, Miss 
Huston Bishop, Miss Ray Johnson, Miss Josephine 
Hannigan, Miss Olga Atherton, Miss Helen Chaf- 
fee. Miss Pearl Seeley and Miss Mattie Milton of 
San Francisco. At the tea two recent engagements 
were much discussed. One was that of Miss Cor- 
nelia Winder, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. 
Winder of this city, and Mason Ball, of the U. S. A. 
The other was that of Miss Brent Watkins of Al- 
hambra and John North, an attorney of San Fran- 
cisco. 



At the Glendale Clubhouse 

The beautiful new clubhouse at Glendale was 
opened Friday for the first social entertainment 
given by a member. Mrs. Daniel Campbell of Ard 
Eevin, North Glendale, invited 250 friends for an 
afternoon musicale. The patio and spacious rooms 
were beautifully decorated and the scene was most 
picturesque when the big building, which is a fine 
type of modern Spanish architecture, was thronged 
with gaily dressed women. Mrs. Campbell was 
assisted in receiving by Mrs. Leslie Coombs Brand, 
Mrs. David Henry Imler, Mrs. N. Lawrence Ward, 
Mrs. George U. Moyse, Mrs. Alexander Mitchell, 
Miss Mary W. McPeak and Miss Cora Hickman. 
Miss Nellie McPeak, Miss Janie McPeak and Miss 
Louisa McPeak were at the punch bowl. 



Mrs. John W. Mitchell and her niece, Miss 
Dorothy Parry-Jones of Wales, have returned from 
a four months' tour through Mexico. They have 
been missed from Los Angeles. The Mitchell resi- 
dence at First and Vermont avenues is one of the 
most picturesque and most hospitable of Los 
Angeles homes and its reopening to the many 
friends who belong to society and the upper classes 
of Bohemia will be a pleasant midsummer event. 
Mr. Mitchell met Mrs. Mitchell and Miss Parry- 
Jones at the Grand Canyon and brought the travel- 
ers home. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. Percival Gerson, No. 639 West- 
lake avenue, invited fifty friends to a conversation 
Sunday evening at which Dr. J. H. Hyslop talked 
on psychic phenomena. Benjamin Fay Mills intro- 
duced the distinguished scientific investigator, who 
made a brief address and then answered questions. 
Lawyers, physicians, and leading men in other pro- 
fessions took part in a discussion of deepest interest. 

Mrs. Morris Bradley Jackson, Jr., who with her 
sister, Miss Minnie Oliphant, has been visiting at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Otho F. Coe, No. 456: 






So.Bn O AD WAY 



'um& 



So. Hill Street 



A. PUSBNOT CO. 

"The Store Beautiful" 

OUR BIG 

Drapery Section 

Is receiving almost every day 



For the interior adornment of fine homes. The more 
exacting and extensive your knowledge of DRAP- 
ERIES and ORIENTAL RUGS the more you will 
appreciate the superior taste displayed in the selec- 
tion of our Exclusive Styles for Fall. 

J^asft K.ece5vedl. 

iimsg New Isa JB&tlhi 



The design is entirely new, being made to match 
exactly the tiling of your bath room. In DELFT 
BLUE, PINK, CHERRY RED, DARK BLUE and 
DARK GREEN. Shown in 4 sizes. Priced as follows 
$1.50 $2.25 $3.00 $5.00 

SEE OUR FINE LINE OF ORIENTAL RUGS 
before purchasing. They are so reasonably priced. 



An Evening \A/r 
Browning 



H 




Readings 
from 

Popular 
Books 



MISS GILBERT will furnish evening entertainments for 
select gatherings during July and August. Address 

42 1 W. Adams St.. Phone B 3 1 26 



PARLOR MILLINERY... 



dills 



Miss Lillie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F 3J7S 



Pacific Outlook 



2:: 



\lli\n Drive, Icfi Los Angeles Wednesday 
morning t'"r her home in Seattle. As one of the 
< Hiphant a \yide reputa- 

tion as a singing evai her marriage 

she has seldom appeared before an audience, as she 
lias retired from public life, but she was In 
in Los Angeles on the in 01 her brief visit. 

Miss Minnie ( lliphant will pass a month in South- 
ern California. She is now . n literary work 
and will finish several magazine commissions lie- 
fore returning to the North. 

Mrs. Idah Meacham Strobridge gave a theater 
party Monday evening at the Belasco. Alter the 
play supper was served at Mrs. Strobridge's bunga- 
low, Artemisia. The following guests were enter- 
tained: Dr. and Mrs. Tasket i liarles F. Lum- 
Mr. and Mrs. Will 11. Cole, Mrs. [rving Way. 
Miss I. eta Horlocker, Miss (Catherine Thompson, 
Miss Minnie Brown, and Edward J. Elson, William 
I.. Judson, Oswald Granicher, Allison (!. Fulsom 
and Charles S. Ward. 

Mrs. Evelyn McCauley gave a tea Monday at the 
home of her aunt. Mrs. E. H. Barmore, No. 621 
South Grand avenue, at which fifteen of her college 
friends were guests. Covers were laid for Misses 
Gertrude Workman, Andrietta Classed. Aileen 
Staub, Constance Britt, Adele Hunlsber'ger, Gladys 
Rowley, Helen Macleish, Ethel Davenport. Cecilia 
Lower of Kansas City, Doris Davidson, Florence 
Clark, Gladys Ackerman, Mary Lindley and Muriel 
Stewart. 

Aubrey St. Clair, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
St. Clair, entertained the members of the Arroyo 
I 1 nnis Club last Saturday evening at the home of 
his parents on East Avenue Forty-one. The guests 
included: Turbese Lummis, Natalie Cole, Larvoka 
Connel, Delcie Connell, Edwin Gettins, Chris Get- 
tins, Ray McDonald, Marie McDonald and Leona 
McKay. 

Gregory Perkins, Jr., is rcjuicing over the narrow 
escape he had in the street car accident last Sunday 
when half a dozen persons were more or less 
seriously injured. Mr. Perkins, who occupied an 
^inside seat near the motorman, ,vas thrown from 
the car. He fell on his face and sustained painful 
bruises, but he is recovering rapidly. 

James R. Garfield, secretary of the interior, will 
make his headquarters at the home of his mother 
in Pasadena during his visit in this part of the state. 
For the last three years Mrs. ( iarfield has occupied 
a picturesque bungalow in Pasadena. She is a quiet, 
retiring woman, who lives the simple life most suc- 
cessfully. 

Mrs. Merrill Moore Grigg's summer course of 
readings at Cumnock Hall have been most success- 
ful. Mrs. Grigg chose "Hiawatha" for her Wednes- 
day morning programme this week. It was given 
to the accompaniment of music. 

Mrs. M. Burton Williamson and her daughters. 
Miss Estella and Miss Lillian Williamson, of Holly- 
wood, will give an informal reception next Tuesday 
afternoon in honor of their house guest. Miss 
Maude Willis of New York. 

The marriage of Miss Beulah Allison, daughter 
of Dr. and Airs. J. S. Allison of Monrovia, and Don- 
nie P. Longsdon is announced. The ceremony was 
performed secretly in Santa Barbara two months 
Lgo after the bride's parents had decided that, on 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY 



■ ' ! 



WALL PAPER 

( )wing in the late arri\ al 0! 

Spring Shipment 

We are caught 

OVERSTOCKED 

These (.to,,!- 

MUST BE PAID FOR 



To turn them into cash u 
have inaugurated a 



'33'- % 



DISCOUNT SALE 

Thousands of rolls at actual 

Manufacturers' Prices 

Fine importations direct from Germany. England, 

Belgium and France. Also a complete line of 

Domestic Goods. 

This is not a clearing up sale of old stuck. Every- 
thing has been selected with the greatest care. 

We always have a force of expert Workmen 
And positively guarantee all work satisfactory 

L. A. Wall Paper Co. 

900 S. BROADWAY 

Free estimates on Papering, Tinting, Frescoing and 

Painting 
Main 2087 F 7779 




Toilet 
Parlors 



The most sanitary and the most up-to-date hair 
dressing parlors — with the largest and most complete 
stock of hair goods in the city. 

All her preparations are guaranteed under the pure food and drug laws. 

Hair Dressing, Shampooing, Manicuring 
HEADQUARTERS 

Central Department Store 

609-619 South Broadway 
On Balcony Adjoining Ladies' Rest Room 




MCDONALD'S IU1RDKE55ING COLLEGE Wantcd- 



Women 
Students 



TO LEARN A PROFITABLE BUSINESS 

The demand for our graduates is far greater than 
the supply. We want bright young women to take 
the Summer Course — Special rates for July, August 
and September. 

MacDONALD. 204 MERCANTILE PLACE, 
Los Angeles, Cal. Upstairs near Spring St. 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



account of the girl's youth, her marriage must be 
postponed for several years. Mr. Longsdon, who is 
a nephew of Mrs. J. B. Brown, is an Englishman, a 
favorite in society. The friends of the young couple 
are now offering congratulations and the only re- 
grets expressed by Dr. and Mrs. Allison are that 
th ;y had not the privilege of attending the wedding. 

Von Ogden Vogt of New York City, secretary of 
the World's Christian Endeavor Society, passed 
several days in Los Angeles this week before start- 
ing for a month's horseback trip among the Navajo 
Indians. Mr. Vogt is a prominent member in the 
new Presbyterian Brotherhood of America. 

Mrs. J. Wesley Sprague, No. 1740 Harvard boule- 
vard, gave a garden party Tuesday afternoon ' at 
which guests from Pasadena and several of the 
beaches met a number of Los Angeles women who 
are in the city for the purpose of resting between 
trips to the various resorts. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Larimer of the Hotel West- 
more were guests of honor last Saturday evening 
at an informal musicale given by Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter J. Wren, Miss Ethel Graham, Miss Helen 
McCutchan, Miss Lucille Roberts and Miss Agnes 
Dursseret. 

Mr. and Mrs. George P. Thresher and their 
daughters, Miss Thresher and Miss Helen Thresher, 
of No. 37 Westmoreland place, started last week 
on a long camping trip through Northern Califor- 
nia and Oregon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gail B. Johnson and their two 
daughters, Miss Ray Johnson and Miss Virginia 
Johnson, went to Santa Barbara this week in their 
touring car. They will pass a month at the beach. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Everett announce the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Miss Inez Verene 
Everett, and Clifford R. S. Home. Miss Everett is 
a graduate of the Girls' Collegiate school. 

Captain and Mrs. Randolph Banning, Dr. and 
Mrs. Granville MacGowan and George Denis passed 
this week at El Descanso, Avalon, the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. Hancock Banning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernardo Shorb of San Francisco 
have been passing' part of their honeymoon in 
Southern California. Mrs. Shorb was formerly 
Miss Elizabeth Sheehan. 

Mrs. Frederick Tritle, widow of the late Governor 
Tritle of Arizona, has come to Los Angeles to pass 
the summer with her old friend, Mrs. E. P. Clark, 
No. 9 St. James Park. , 

Mrs. Idah Meacham Strobridge is preparing for 
autumn publication a new book of fiction, "Desert 
Short Stories", a companion volume to her "In 
Miners' Mirage Land." 

Washington Hadley of Whittier is said to be the 
oldest bank president in the United States. Mr. 
Hadley recently celebrated his ninetieth birthday 
anniversary. 

Thomas Fatheringham Osborn, widely known as 
an expert in the construction of reinforced concrete 
buildings, died last week at San Diego. 

Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Davis and Miss Bertha C. 
Davis of Santa Barbara have been enjoying a mid- 
summer visit in Los Angeles. 

Lanier Bartlett aiid Harley Hamilton met quite 
unexpectedly at Lucerne. Switzerland, July 8. Mr. 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
S4MNGS/. ; BANK 




The building of a 
Bank Account is 
not difficult if the 
"builder" is persist- 



ent. 



This Bank is the medium through which over 20,000 
people are saving money, tfl Bear in mind that the German- 
American Savings Bank has the largest Capital and Surplus 
of any Savings Bank in Los Angeles. Q Resources over 
$10,000,000. Four per cent on deposits. 

CS? rmatt-Anifnran fairings lank 

223 South Spring St,. Branch: Main and First. Sts. 



£ 


1 


sgip 








£ 










& 


n 


Dra 

it 


gon 


Trade 


Mark 


£ 



Sing Fat Co., 



Inc. 



Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-19 South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 1121 POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



Los Angeles 

OstricK Farm 

Opposite 

EAST LAIiE PARK 

5c Car Fare on City or Pacific Electric Cars 

City Salesroom 
324 S. Broadway 

Most Beautiful Feather Display Ever Made 

in Los Angeles 

Manufacturers' Prices 

We Repair, Redye and Recurl 

5 Acres of Gigantic 
^=Birds — 





Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



Pacific Outlook 



25 



Bartlett with lii> part} i- now traveling through 
Germany. Mr. Hamilton will attend the Wagnerian 
festival t>> be held in Munich next month and will 
sail for home September S. 

Mr. and Mrs. Max Enderlein have arrived in Los 
Angeles. They will be at home at No. 6065 Hayes 
street. Highland park, the residence of Mrs, Ella 
Enderlein. 

Mrs. Charles Wellington Rand has returned from 
a six weeks' trip to NTew York. With her two sons 
and her daughter Mrs. Rand is at her cottage near 
Venice. 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Lummis are entertain- 
ing; Dr. Richard Lund of Benialillo, New Mexico, 
who has been their house guest this week. 

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Davidson and daughter. 
Miss Doris Davidson, of No. 327 South Alvarado 
street, will pass August at Balboa Beach. 

Mrs. Margaret A. Wilcox, a successful woman 
inventor, celebrated her seventy-seventh birthday 
anniversary last week in Los Angeles. 

Prince d'Abro Pagratide, son of the late prime 
minister of Egypt, has been a guest at the Hotel 
Alexandria this week. 

The Woman's Club of Hollywood gave a 
luncheon and card party Wednesday in the new 
club rooms. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson with their 
family will pass the month of August in Northern 
California. 

Frank F. Stone, the Los Angeles sculptor, has 
made the clay model for a bust of the late Francis 
Murphy. 

Mrs. Milo Potter and Miss Nina Jones have re- 
turned to the Hotel Potter, Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. Bryant Mathews has returned from a visit 
at the home of her parents in San Diego. 

Tames T. King, a capitalist of Jacksonville, Ills., 
is in the city for a visit. 

Mrs. Mary Longstreet and Mrs. Wilcox have 
gone to Lake Tahoe. 

Colonel J. B. Lankershim has returned from the 
East. 

* * * 

A Grand Old Man 

Rabbi A. W. Edelman, one of the most widely 
known and scholarly Hebrew churchmen on the Pa- 
cific coast, has been lying at death's door for some 
time and, in spite of his wonderful vitality, it is not 
expected that his recovery will be possible. Rabbi 
Edelman is one of the earliest pioneers of Los An- 
geles. A native of Germany, he came to America 
at an early age. , In the pioneer days of San Fran- 
cisco he removed to that city and labored there un- 
til forty-five year ago, when he came to Los An- 
geles. A man of rare graces of character, he en- 
deared himself to a great multitude of friends. His 
demise, which was expected at any moment as these 
lines were written, will be followed by general and 
heartfelt regret among all classes. Rabbi Edelman 
is seventy-five year of age. A portrait of this grand 
old man appears on the front cover of this Nsue of 
the Pacific Outlook. 



tl L*rgtit at i ; TuTiutun in tht Wtst" 

I JBRARY ELEGANCE 

A k In the line of furniture is nowhere better portrayed than at our 
• • store. The genuine leather upholstered Turkish chairs, the 
commodious davenports, the well proportioned genuine 
mahogany library tables, the bookcases, carpets, rugs, etc.,— in fact 
everything that would lend a pleasing appearance will be found in our 
stock. *| Prompt delivery in perfect condition. 



£3Furttttur«, <£©: 

640-646 SOUTH MILL ST. ' 



May L. Evans and Vera E. Herrmann 

Public Stenographers 
Notaries Public .... 

Appointments can be made for Evening or Sunday Work 



Pho 



(Home F 6904 



(Main 5154 

CONVENIENT TO ALL PRINCIPAL HOTELS 
Opposite Angelus, one block from Van Nuys, one block from Alexan- 
dria, one block from Westminster, in the center 



of the business 

Suite Four Hundred and Ten 



district 

Union Trust Building 




Pure Air is Cviringf 

Consumption 



In diseases of the Lungs, Heart and Kidneys, you 
nped more oxygen than you are getting. Pure air 
without dangerous drafts, secured by sleeping in the 
cottage built for health. 

WALKER PORTABLE COTTAGE: 
On exhibition, rear 420 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



PHONE HOME A 4432 

4TH ST. STORE 



F 7671; MAIN 4604 

SPRING ST. STORE 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4-TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST. 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



Painter of Missions 

Working quietly in her picturesque studio on the 
top floor of the Woman's Club building, Mrs. Mary 
L. Stevens has accomplished a task which unites 
historic interest with that naturally felt in what is 
a fine artistic achievement. Mrs. Stevens has paint- 
ed twenty-two of the California missions with rare 
mingling of poetic feeling and painstaking fidelity. 
This does not mean that her technique is not broad 
or that her treatment is not modern. 

After years of frequent sojournings among the 
ancient buildings, which she has sketched again 
and again, the opportunity came to paint this series 
of splendid studies. Upon small canvases of uni- 
form size — the pictures are to be used for mural 




Mrs. Mary L. Stevens 

Well known artist in old time costume worn at a Friday Morning 

Club merrymaking. 

ornamentation — the artist painted not alone the old 
structures of adobe and plaster, but enough of their 
environment to convey an impression of the charac- 
ter of the country surrounding them. A mountain 
or a sweep of valley land, a single giant palm tree 
or a stretch of dusty road once trodden by pilgrim 
feet gives to each mission its own individuality. 

In a really remarkable way Mrs. Stevens has suc- 
ceeded in reproducing the architecture of long ago. 
Where time has left its mark upon the crumbling 
walls she has obtained something more than mere 
color effects: she has put in -with the brush strokes 
a fine perception of the vague meanings left by 
vanished days and by the lives of patient padres. It 



is quite difficult to choose from all these pictures 
the one that is best from the point of view of the 
artist. All are painted with such a vivid realization 
of values and such a delicacy of discrimination that 
the last one studied seems the most successful. "Mt. 
Carmel-by-the-Sea" is one of the strongest in draw- 
ing and the most beautiful in coloring. 

In order to assure variety the changing seasons 
of California have been represented in the glimpses 
of landscape so cleverly employed to help tell the 
story of the missions. In front of the San Fernando 
Mission is a gorgeous poppy field carpet. The San 
Diego Mission is one of the most interesting, inas- 
much as it was sketched nearly twenty years ago 
and is therefore shown as it was before it fell into 
its present state. 

The San Francisco Mission as it appeared in the 
early days should be treasured as a valuable pos- 
session. This was always a favorite study for the 
artist, who has preserved many sketches. The view 
given in the finished picture is one of the best that 
could be procured. The Santa Margarita Chapel at 
San Luis Obispo is an effective picture bringing to 
the person who sees it much of the atmosphere of 
the place. San Antonio de Pala, Santa Clara and 
the Soldad Missions are shown from their most pic- 
turesque points of view. San Juan Bautista, now 
rapidly falling into hopeless ruins, is among the 
most noteworthy of the pictures. This Is seen as it 
appeared in its better days and to it Mrs. Stevens 
has given touch that can be inspired only by the 
poetic imagination. 

In Mr. Stevens's studio are many pictures which 
demonstrate her rare versatility. In line with her 
mission pictures is the "Feast of Corpus Christi", 
a big picture representing the ceremony of the late 
springtime. This is a difficult subject handled with 
originality. Here the figures introduced with dis- 
crimination help to tell the story. They are merely 
indicated but each contributes to the fascinating of 
a most unusual picture. A marine, "Moonlight at 
Ocean Park", is a bit of the sea that proves the 
artist's right to the highest praise. Indeed, she ap- 
pears to have a special fondness for the ocean, from 
which she has drawn inspiration for many of her 
best pictures. 

Mrs. Stevens is a member of the Friday Morning 
club and the portrait reproduced in this issue of 
the Pacific Outlook is a snap shot taken at one of 
the old fashioned parties enjoyed now and then by 
the members. It was said on this occasion that the 
artist with her crown of snow white hair, rolled in 
the softest of puffs, and her gown of bygone days 
was as beautiful as any of the pictures that have 
made fame for her. 



Portrait of Mrs. Hancock Banning 

Joseph .Greenbaum has completed a portrait of 
Mrs. Hancock Banning which reveals the artist's 
best powers and must become a prized possession 
to the family of the gentle, aristocratic looking 
woman who sat for it. The portrait has wonderful 
charm when considered merely as a picture, for it 
presents much that appeals to, the imagination. At 
first sight it might be taken for the interpretation of 
an ideal personality. It represents serenity, repose, 
sweetness and an elusive quality which suggests 
reserve strength and well conserved decision of 
character. 

The pose is easy, graceful and effective. The cos- 



Pacific Outlook 



■>: 



tunic has been happily chosen. A black picture hat 
shades the delicate, oval face framed with hair of 
the brown shade in which are de> p tints of gold. A 
diaphanous white costume contrasts with the black 
hat. Tin- hands, long an. I slender, hold a book 
which apparently ha- given to the reader a thought 
conducive t>> pleasant reflections. The clear cm. 
regular features, the large eyes set beneath well 
arched brows and the strongly modeled chin have 
furnished inspiration to the artist and .Mr. Green- 
baum lias made the best of his opportunity For 
strong draughtsmanship. One might wish thai he 
had made the line of the chin and the neck just a 
shade less sharp but such a criticism seems like 
petty fault finding when the real worth of the por- 
trait as an artistic production i s considered. 

The flesh tints are wonderfully luminous and the 
■ scheme is harmonious. Air. Greenbaum has 
succeeded in portraying a beautiful spirit as well as 
a beautiful woman, hi many ways this portrait is 
the best thing' the artist has done since he came to 
Los Angeles a year ago. This is saying a great 
deal, for .Mr. Greenbaum has produced a number of 
noteworthy portraits and landscapes. 

The reproduction of Mrs. Banning's portrait in 
this issue of the Pacific Outlook failsto suggest the 
background, which is a shadowy bit of landscape 
against which the black hat and the white gown 
are not too strongly outlined. 



Great Exhibition Proposed 

The Fine Arts League has under consideration 
the advisability of holding next October a high- 
grade exhibition of paintings by California artists. 
Circulars have been sent to the principal painters 
of the state who are asked to express opinions con- 
cerning the desirability of the plan. Should the ex- 
hibition be given, a jury of seven artists will be 
chosen. This exhibition evidently is contemplated as 
a preliminary step toward the assembling of ex- 
hibits for the permanent art gallerv which is to be 
built on the lofty site at Highland Park, for the cir- 
cular contains the following paragraph : 

"Would the opportunity to keep one of your pic- 
tures in the gallery of the Fine Arts League, when 
established, to be sold or replaced at your own dis- 
cretion or convenience, be regarded as advantage- 
ous, the merit of the picture to be decided upon by 
the jury of selection? A higher court of appeal will 
be another board of artists living in other parts of 
the United States and in the Old World; men and 
women who have won distinction on both con- 
tinents." 



Art Notes 

John Donovan's two weeks' exhibition of marines 
attracted more than ordinary attention. It was pre- 
dicted that the artist would find difficulty in luring 
the public to see pictures, these July days, but ex- 
periment showed that Mr. Donovan's work had 
drawing power. Two pictures were sold early in 
the week and it is probable one or two others will be 
purchased before the exhibition closes. 

The exhibition of the Guild of Book Workers 
held this week in Arts and Crafts hall. No. 718 
Spring street, was a noteworthy event that brought 
together artists and book lovers. It was opened 
Wednesday evening with a reception at which Miss 
Emily Preston, one of the founders of the guild, 



made a brief address on hook binding. Miss Oc- 
tavia Holden and Miss Charlotte Mytton, to whom 

l.o- Anglic- i- indebted for the exhibition, are en- 
titled to sincere gratitude for what proved l" be a 

successful effort i,, intertsi the public in this the 
making of beautiful hook-. Displayed in the big 
cases were about fift) specimens of the work of 

celebrated I k hinders of the day. Among these 

were several exquisitely tooled and artistically 
hound volumes, the work of Miss Holden and Miss\ 
Mytton. Among the exhibits brought from New 
York were several thai have been much exploited in 
the eastern pre--. 

Hector Alliot has repeated his last year's success 
at the Long Beach Chautauqua. Mr. Alliot de- 
livered his three illustrated lectures to crowded 
houses and demonstrated that interest in art can be 
awakened if the man who makes the appeal pos- 
sesses the broad knowledge and the sincere en- 
thusiasm that command more than indifferent hear- 
ing. As a public speaker Mr. Alliot has developed 
powers which promise much for a lyceum career if 
he ever decides to devote himself to platform work. 

Miss Lida Price and Miss Mary Harland are now 
established in their cottage at Santa Monica. I'.oth 
these successful artists are busy. Miss Price is 
hastening work on several pictures that must be 
finished before she begins her duties as teacher of 
drawing in the high school and as supervisor of 
drawing in the graded schools of Santa Monica. 
Miss Harland. who is at her studio in the Blanch- 
ard building, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, is engaged 
on several new miniatures. 

Miss Emily H. White, wdio has been at Laguna 
Beach several weeks, will bring back to Los An- 
geles a number of water colors that prove her de- 
cided talent as a marine painter. Miss White has 
been known as a successful miniature painter and 
now that she is devoting attention to the sea, to 
which she has long acknowledged allegiance, much 
interest is felt in her summer's work. 

Alexander Stirling Caldcr made his first appear- 
ance as a lecturer Wednesday afternoon at the 
Long Beach Chautauqua. Air. Calder spoke on 
"The Plastic Art" to a large audience. 

William Wendt came back to Los Angeles this 
week for a brief visit. Air. Wendt has been sketch- 
ing at Laguna Beach for the last month. 

Caroline Benedict Trowbridge will exhibit a col- 
lection of pictures in Blanchard hall the week he- 
ginning July 2. 

Nona L. White, artist and art critic, has returned 
from a week's vacation at Laguna Beach. 

When last heard from Perez Field, the art critic, 
was in Paris. 

* * * 
Yes-No-Er-Um-Well, Never Mind 

Father — You are very backward in your arith- 
metic. When 1 was your age I was doing cube 
root. 

What's that? 

Father — What ! You don't even know what it 
is? Dear me. that's terrible. Here, give me your 
pencil. Now we'll take, say, 1. 2. 3. 4, and find the 
cube root. First you divide — no: you — let me set 
— um — yes — no — well, never mind — after all v per- 
haps you're too young to understand it. — Tit-Bits. 



28 



Pacific Outlook 




Has Signed Big Attractions 

L. E. Behymer has returned from a six weeks' 
trip East. Mr. Behymer visited a number of the 
eastern cities that are amusement centers, and, of 
course, passed as much time as possible in New 
York. He has booked for next season many of the 
greatest musical artists; and, notwithtanding the 
fact that unsettled conditions in San Francisco have 
the effect of reducing the confidence of managers 
in the paying possibilities of engagements in the 
northern city, he has signed the biggest attractions. 
Mr. Behymer has earned a national reputation by 
his success and his courage in providing the best 
for Southern California, and Los Angeles next sea- 
son will have a chance to enjoy the finest musical 
programmes by the foremost singers and instru- 
mentalists. 



Miss Barrymore's Success 

Ethel Barrymore this week has delighted good 
sized audiences at the Mason Opera House. In her 
well known little comedy "Captain Jinks" she 
proved that each season she is adding something to 
her artistic attainments and losing nothing of her 
3'outh and delightful girlishness. The Clyde Fitch 
play was relieved at the end of the week by the one 
act sketch, "Carrots," a clever character study that 
proves how good an actress is this young star who 
has come into fame by the right of heredity and en- 
vironment, as well as by the right of natural talent 
and rare personality. 



Will Get Syndicate Plays 

Announcement that the Los Angeles, formerly 
the ill-fated Hotchkiss theater, will be used for 
many of the syndicate plays usually sent to the 
Mason opera house caused more or less curiosity 
this week. It is explained that the dollar attrac- 
tions only will be given at the Los Angeles, while 
those that are higher priced will be seen at the 
Mason. 



At the Belasco 

"Mrs. Dane's Defense" at the Belasco this week 
gave Hobart Bosworth a chance to repeat the suc- 
cess he won a year ago when he made his first ap- 
pearance before a Los Angeles audience in the role 
of Sir Daniel Carteret. Adele Farrington's Lady 
Eastney stood out as a fine characterization. 



"The Climbers" 
"The Climbers" at the Burbank has delighted au- 
diences not two critical. Perhaps the summer 
weather diminished the usual professional enthu- 
siasm that distinguishes the stock company. Tim 
Frawley's Ned Warden and Mr. Desmond's Dick 
Sterling. saved the play. 



Marhet for California Oranges 

The United States consul at Roubaix, France, 
writing to Washington, says : "California oranges 
are not in evidence in the markets of this part of 
France, although they should, it would seem, find 
ready sale here at certain seasons, when a good 
quality of oranges of French and other European 
origin has not yet matured. No oranges are mar- 
keted here in the summer and autumn. With the 
beginning of winter they first appear, but are sour 
and of poor quality, generally, and not until March 
are good ones to be had. 

"Certain varieties of California and Florida or- 
anges mature as early as September. The oppor- 
tune time for the sale here of this fruit, of which 
such abundant crops are now grown in the United 
States, would be during the six months from Sep- 
tember to March ;. and the greater advantage would 
inure to the earliest practicable shipments of a good 
article. This opinion is based ,on the assumption 
that the fruit can be gotten here in good condition, 
and it is confidently believed it can be, and that it 
is offered for sale at a fair price." 




A PROPOSITION 

*** wilninin mam. 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St,. 




Office Phone: Ji lost 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

3S5 South Hill Street 

Residence Phone: E 2727 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



NEED OF HIGH IDEALS 



Bv John II GH 

Success, as an object worthy of attainment, is 
achieved only by honorable methods; success, praise- 
worthy and desirable as an end, is not worthy of the 
name when it is reached by dishonorable or ques- 
tionable means. In this problem of success there is 
no room for the false maxim that "the end justifies 
the mean-." 

That man truly succeeds, whether in the accumu- 
lation of wealth, in the achievement of fame or place 
or power, or in any commendable purpose to which 
his ambition may lead, who has no fear that the ex- 
position of the means he u-es to attain his end shall 
summon the blush of shame to his cheek or cause 
his parents or his children to seek refuge from dis- 
grace in the sanctuary of grief: in other words that 
alone is worthy of the name of success which has 
been won by manly, honorable, honest means, which 
will stand, alike, the test of publicity and the all- 
searching scrutiny of the Judgment Day. 

In this commercial age, when there is a desire for 
wealth, not only in the shape of moderate fortunes, 
but in colossal piles, which cast a shadow as large 
as the tower of Babel ; in this age of money mad- 
ness, of frenzied finance, when the fever and the ague 
of the Metropolitan exchange seem to have fastened 
their clutchs in the very marrow of a large portion 
of humanity, in this age when the pernicious ad- 
vice, which may be suitably characterized only by 
the ugly word "damnable," "Get rich, my son, hon- 
estly, if you can, but get rich, anyway," seems to 
be given by example, is not by precept, in this age 
when David Harum's brazen rule, "Do others be- 
fore they do you," appears to be not so much the 
author's mode of forcibly expressing the blunted 
morals of an individual as it is his sympathetic con- 
clusion of the diseased ethics of a large and constant- 
ly growing group : in this age, when money, like 
charity, covers a multiude of sins, there is an urgent, 
clamorous need of honest men in every avenue of 
life, of. men who believe and act and live the un- 
tarnished golden rule, "Do unto others as you 
would that they should do unto you." 

The Scriptures tell us that "Unless the Lord build 



the bouse, they labor in vain who build it." What 
bonis ii that tin- merchant knows that sixteen 
ounces make one pound or thirty-six inches one yard, 
if on every occasion when he thinks he may do so 
without detection he .nlptsts his scales at fourteen 
or fifteen ounces to the pound, and measures bis 
yard with a tape or a stick thirty-four or thirty-five 
inchc - long? 

Shall that lawyer's career be pronounced a suc- 
cess who banishes from our earthly courts the re- 
lied ion nf the sunlight of eternal Trust and Justice 
by suggestively telling litigants, after hearing their 
eidence in the privacy of his chambers, that on the 
evidence adduced they have no cause of action, but 
if they could find witnesses wdio would testify "thus 
and so." then there was a sure verdict in store for 
them:' 

Can that preacher effectively preach charity who 
is noted for avarice, or can he be successful in doing 
God's work on earth when his actions belie his 
words and his daily life is one prolonged emphasis 
of the truth of the statement, that "It is a good di- 
vine that follows his own instructions?' 

Real success depends upon character, and charac- 
ter first of all is what a man's inner consciousness 
tells him that he is in the sight of his Creator, and 
in a secondary sense it is what his fellowmen think 
they know him to be, when as intimates they see him 
under the penetrating light of the Roentgen rays of 
confiding friendship, or as mere acquaintances they 
see him only dimly and in the distance. 

ftonesty, then, is a primary requisite for true suc- 
cess in our life-calling, whatever it may be ; it is so 
for the citizen in private life, and it is so, need I say 
it, for the people's servant in public office. The 
journals of our day, both yellow and white, record 
the ignominious failures, the abysmal falls from 
high places, and the heartaches and tears of relatives 
and friends at the moral and physical suicide of men 
whom the syrens "Graft" and "Boodle" and "Defal- 
cation" and "Embezzlement" have lured to their 
deadly embrace. 

Honesty is a primary requisite for true success, 
and while every man is born honest, and an unim- 
peached character is his birthright, he nevertheless 
must always remember that he is but a creature, 
finite, fallible, weak, human, sinful, and subject to 



The Reynolds Brothers' 



Thoroughly 
Patented 



Wave Motor H * h,y 



Indorsed 



Based on Correct Principles and Sound Philosophy 




CALIFORNIA WAVE MOTOR CO. 



A complete unit system of wave 
power production, equalization and 
transmission. Backed by conservative 
business judgment and planned by in- 
telligent mechanics. Utilizes the hori- 
zontal motion of the ocean waves, the 
greater force of the ocean's energy. 
One of the great things that is com- 
ing that can scarcely be spoken of in 
figures. Solves the question of light, 
heat and power without the use of 
fuel of any kind. Use good judgment 
and buy stock in it now, while it is 
young. Grow up with it and become 
a member of the richest corporation 
in the world. 

312 South Broadway 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



a thousand temptations which surround him as does 
the atmosphere which he breathes. 

To Le successful in life a man must be in every 
sense of the word a moral man, and to be a moral 
man h« must be a religious man, for religion is the 
bond tbnt ties man to God, as prayer is the wireless 
telegraphy that communicates the creature's 
thought i and hopes and fears to the Creator, who 
answers, that prayer by giving the creature the 
strengt'i and courage to do what is right, regardless 
of human respect or popular clamor, in the moment 
of temptation and doubt, and to say to the tempter, 
"Get thee behind me, Satan." 

Education in itself, however technical, however 
scientific, however broad, however liberal, cannot 
make a man moral or honest, cannot add one cubit 
to the stature of his natural virtues. Morality, to be 
worthy of the name, must confer on the person pos- 
sessing it the acquired, virtues, the supernatural vir- 
tues, which are alike a shield for our protection and 
a sword for our defense. 

* * * 
Beyond tHe City 

The twenty third annual session of the Chautau- 
qua association of Southern California began last 
Monday in Long Beach. It will close Saturday, 
July 27. 

Santa Ana is fast becoming a manufacturing cen- 
ter. The Pacific Coast Soda company will begin 
this month the erection of a plant that will cost 
$300,000 and employ 700 men. 

Three hundred tons of apricots were dried this 
season in Redlands. One man received $3,000 for 
his crop of fruit grown on a five acre ranch. 

A syndicate of English capitalists has secured an 
option on the Temescal Tin Mines, which are owned 
by the San Jacinto Land Company. 

* * * 
Changes at Occidental 

George F. Cook, Ph. D., of Baker University, 
Kansas, has been elected professor of education and 
assistant professor of mathematics in Occidental 
College. Miss Frances Rosanna Foote, who has been 
librarian at Pomona College, will have charge of 
the Stimson library at Occidental. 

* * * 
His Best Love 

"Any accident in your motor trip through Italy 
and France, Morgan?" "Nothing worth mention- 
ing. My wife was thrown out and bruised a bit, 
but the machine never got so much as a scratch." 
— Life. 

* * * 

CKristian Science vs. BerKeleyism 

Los Angeles, July 14, 1907. 

To the Pacific Outlook: In your issue. of July 6 appears 
an article regarding Christian Science by William R. 
Stewart, who confuses Christian Science with Berkeley 
idealism; consequently his criticisms, while intended for 
Christian Science, do not touch this subject at all. 

If Mr. Stewart understood the teaching of Christian 
Science, he would know that Mrs. Eddy's statement, "All 
is Mind," means that which is just the opposite of the idea 
embraced in Berkeley's statement. While the phrase- 
ology is similar, the principle involved is entirely dif- 
ferent. 

Mrs. Eddy's statement that "All is Infinite Mind and its 
infinite manifestation," denies the reality of evil and im- 
perfection of every kind; and with this basic truth, all 
kinds of disease are being healed, thus proving the cor- 
rectness of the premise. 

That Berkeley's teaching of the allness of mind does not 



>mu 



Facing 
the 
Park 
and 

Close 
to 

Ocean 



Hotel Savoy 



«!>• «!**!• 



EUROPEAN PLAN 



Everything New 

No. 142-144 Pacific Avenue 
Long Beach, Cal. 



Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 

Home 
Phone 
1743 



Phone Home 441 




(flljg jRnrirra 



The Largest and Leading 

Hotel in Long 

Beach 

Modern in all its 
Appointments .. 

M. A. SCHUTZ, M. D. 

Proprietor 

Massage and Turkish Baths in Connection 

Rooms $3.00 per Week and Up 

Corner Second and Chestnut Sts. Long Beach, Cal. 



E WESTPHALIA.. 

M. J. BLAISDELL. Proprietor 



130 West, Third Street, 

ROOMS — Prices from 75 cents per day and up 



Home Phone I 183 Sunset 3443 

Hotel Yale (European) 

Corner First and Pacific Ave. 

and "SURF VIEW" on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M. WORMLEY, Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies, Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread, "Like mother used to make" 

Home Phone IOJ3 
114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



Cljr (ttgntljta anh Annex 



Leading Apartment House in Long Beach 

Opposite Auditorium — Pleasure Pier — P. E. 
Depot and Fronting the Ocean 

Single rooms and 2, 3 and 4 room suites. Every suite has 
private bath. Home 24. P. O. Box 214. 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



M rs. 
) ing to cm 

by his wr 

_■ that c xi only 

when d when not perceived 

lutely nothii n with the teachin 

e, which teaches thai 
ternal and indestructil 

! i 

ley idealism and Chri 

d yel Mr, Slew art thinks that, in the main, the 

doctri identical. Kroni this it is evident that his 

criticism of Chri ncc writers ; superficial 

\ is awry, and the description of their mental 

ability does it . t lit their side of the ho 

Now in regard to Dr, Quimby being rce of Mrs. 

Eddy'? teachings, I would saj that this time-honored lie 
is now becoming hoary with age. Time and time again 
this falsehood has been refill d with incontrovertible 
facts; and in 1883 this matter was .settled by the Circuit 
Court of the United States in the District of Massachu- 
sued a perpetual injunction against one 
Edward J. Arens, who infringed Mrs. Eddy's copyrights 
and who >et up as part of his defense that the copyright 
works of Mrs. Eddy were not original with her, but had 
pied from manuscript originally composed by Dr. 
Quimby. When the time came tor taking testimony. 
Arens gave notice that he would not put in any testimonj ; 
and when his attorney was asked the reason he replied in 
substance. "There i- no evidence to present." 

In addition to this Mrs. Eddy agreed to stand the cost 
of printing and publishing Dr. Quimby's manuscripts in 
order to expose the falsehoods of parties publicly intimat- 
ing that she had appropriated matter belonging to Quim- 
by. This whole question of originality was involved in 
and disposed of by the legal decision refered to. and the 
fact that Mrs. Eddy is the discoverer and founder of 
Christian Science is now formulated as history and ac- 
knowledged by encyclopedias, dictionaries and biographic- 
al works. 

Dr. Quimby was an avowed mesmerist, and Christian 



ce and mes lit and could 

not possibly pn ' ■ .one soui 

While advanced thinkers in all ages have held frag- 
mentary ideas akin , .1 Eddy, and 1 
similar modes of express! Christian 
Science bi longs to ly, and the I 1: i 1 1 lii heal 
ing in. mI. possible bj In 01 been pracl iced 

since tin days of Jes si who discovered 

■ ■ or; I sus and hi-, dis- 
ciples, and from I lii prin ipfe e\ 1 '1 1 ed .1 scienl ific iy item 
of healing and redemption susceptible of proof. 

Christian Science practitioners arc not actuated by mer- 
cenary motives, nor 1- their principal desire the accumu- 
lation oi rich.-, j h '\ charge a very moderate sum for 
services, as compared with the fees of physicians 
and salaries of clergymen, and yet the work of the Chris 
tion Scientist embodies both healing the sick and redeem- 
ing the sinner. 

Mr. Stewart is of the opinion that the Bible does not 
teach the non-existence of matter, which opinion he would 
dismiss if he were acquainted with the Christian Science 
leaching regarding matter, which does not hold that mat- 
ter is a "manifestation of human thought." According to 
Christian Science, matter is a material view of the ideas 
or manifestations of Infinite Mind. This false material 
view is to be corrected' through a purified consciousness 
as the result of spiritual growth. 

This is ill harmony with Scriptural teachings. In If 
Cor. 4-1S, Paul says, "The things which are seen are tem- 
poral; but the things which are not seen are eternal;" and 
it was prophesied of Jesus by Isaiah, "And he shall not 
judge after the sight of his eyes, neither reprove after the 
hearing of his ears." Spiritual (or real) things are spirit- 
ually discerned. 

Healing in Christian Science is accomplished through 
the realization of spiritual perfection, which destroys the 
errors of the human mind, and consequently their physi- 
cal manifestations called disease. 

While Mr. Stewart objects to the statement that "no 
one opposes Christian Science, but rather what they think 
Christian Science is," he is himself a striking example of 
its soundness. 

W. E. BROWN. 









* 




THE WAYSIDE PRESS 




214 FRANKLIN STREET 




Printers, Designers, Binders 


STiQv 




The Character of the Work Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 




s^S p 




QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 








Home A 1853 —Phones— Main 1566 






PRINTING THAT TALKS 









_*-•■* /vugrir^, v no lmhiii 



the i>aiuon\ia nemerianas 



August 1J.M907 



^KtiFO^V 



x 



i 



' A «Ssate?«ft «* ess? 



SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR $ 2°2 



item 



Monday we inaugurate a sale of more than passing interest in Los An- 
geles retailing and of vital importance to every man and woman in 
Southern California. It will be known as the "Development Sale" and 
will celebrate our taking possession and occupying our new addition, 
the building south of us, which hereafter will be known as our South 
Building. 




of the season will mark the beginning of business Monday in this new 
building. The growth of The Fifth Street Store has been marvelous 
and in keeping with its development in size as a store has been its 
growth in the confidence of the people, which has been fostered by 
straightforward business methods and square dealing. The first install- 
ment of bargains for this sale will be published in Sunday's papers. 
Come yourself. Bring your friends and their friends. 



"SOA\ETm 



OINO- 




BROADWAY 



COR FITTM ST. 



.^Ss^ ^^aaA. 




' 


M -iff pin 

PP Mil MJ 


r 

1 




£$$&fy**m^' >• &&& ^ ,..""- - - - - ■ 


~*a 



5>6e True Osteopath. 

is the true 

PHYSICIAN 

He must be fitted to do the best thing possible under 
every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

Will teach you the science of the *.rue Osteopath. 
Fall term begins September 3. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
Pres.; Stanley M. Hunter, Vice-Pres.; W. J. Cook, 
Sec. and C. A. Whiting, Chairman of the Faculty. 
Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Teachers for California 

IjttJE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, f If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-operative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



IB 



:r 



4i> 



(©MEMXDH 



George Baker Jenderson 

CDITOPt 



Ji Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland Klnkald 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gattoupe 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Published every Saturday at 422.423 Chamber of Com* 
meree Building. Los Jrngetes, California, by the 



Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price S2.00 a year In advance. Single copy to 
cents on alt neu>* stands. 

Entered a« iecond-class matter April 5, 1007, at the postoffice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress ot M;nvh j, 1S7.}. 



Vol. 3. Los Jingeles, Cal., Jlugust 3, 1907 Mo. 5 



The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to teturn manuscripts , 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with tbem. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 



"We need clean, healthy newspapers, with clean, 
healthy criticism which shall be FEARLESS AND 
TRUTHFUL."— Theodore Roosevelt. 

COMMENT 

Government of the people, by the people and for 
the people is not many years away in California. 
The iniquitous Southern Pacific machine, with its 
Herrins, its Parkers and its Burkes, shows no in- 
clination to take the numerous very pointed hints 
that have been thrown out by advocates of decent 
government, and the time has come to adopt meas- 
ures to deprive these men forever of the wicked 
power which they, as the hirelings of the machine, 
have wielded. Thoroughly discredited in every city 
and town an'd crossroads in the state, their criminal 
tactics known to everybody of intelli- 
The Time gence, whether Republican, Democrat, 
Has Come Prohibitionist, Union Labor or Social- 
ist, it ought to be a relatively easy 
matter to drag them from their seats of power. 
Nothing is to be accomplished by further essays 
on the ethics of politics. All that can be done by 
the writers and speakers who have been waging 
a campaign in behalf of the people has been done. 
The people have been told, thousands of times — yes, 
millions of times — of the methods employed by 
these unconscionable tricksters who would deprive 
the people of California of the right to govern 



themselves. The campaign of education is aboul 
to end. The time for action has arrived. 

* * * 

Organization, the most perfect and harmonious 
organization which can possibly be effected, is the 
only solution of the once perplexing problem of the 
elimination of the Southern Pacific. We may not 
be able to put the Herrins and the other lesser 
"criminaloids" in prison for their offenses, at least' 
with the courts of California constituted as they are 
and for many years have been, but we can take from 
them their tremendous power and degrade them — 
elevate is really the proper term — to the position of 
the plain citizen. Criticism won't do it, but united 
and harmonious action will. The Pa- 
The Fight cine Outlook is happy to be in a posi- 

Is On tion to state that this means to the end 
sought is about to be accomplished. 
For the first time in the history of this great state, 
for a generation the laughing stock of the remainder 
of the nation, a determined organization is about to 
be effected, if indeed it has not been created before 
these words are put in type, whose chief aim is to 
annihilate the Southern Pacific political bureau in 
California. We have begged, prayed, cajoled, 
threatened, used every possible measure to induce 
this giant iniquity to cease its interference with the 
people's business, all without avail. The time to 
fight is here, and the fight is on. 

* * * 

There, is something attractive and catching in 
that phrase coined by Abraham Lincoln, a phrase 
having to do with the question of government of 
the people, by the people and for the people. There 
is, in our opinion, no other slogan that will attract 
so many voters if used as a war cry. We have had 
for many years a state government of the Southern 
Pacific, by the Southern Pacific and for the South- 
ern Pacific. How healthful, how promising, how 
popular the other cry will become ! It is hardly be- 
lievable that the intelligent and decent, the self-re- 
specting, politically moral, honest and reasonably 
courageous Republicans of California will hesitate 
to join a movement having for its foundation the 
famous motto of the great Lincoln. In Los An- 
geles, if in no other great center 
Of, By and For of population in the state, the 
the People plain people have given abund- 

ant evidence of their inclination 
to tear themselves away from the domination of the 



Pacific Outlook 



dishonest, corrupt and corrupting railroad influence. 
The day following the organization of the independ- 
ent city movement which afterward was charac- 
terized by the name "non-partisan," Walter F. X. 
Parker, the boss of the so-called Republican organ- 
ization in this city, boldly announced his belief that 
the movement would not amount to much ; that 
desire for office was back of it. The falsity of the 
latter claim was made apparent when it became 
known that every member of the central committee 
of the Non-Partisans had pledged himself not only 
to refuse to become a candidate for public office, 
but also to refuse to accept appointment at the 
hands of Mr. Gates, in the event that he should be 
chosen mayor. 

* * *■ 

We may confidently look forward to ridicule, 
sneers and threats from the Herrins and the Par- 
kers, if they speak at all, immediately upon the 
heels of the organization of men who have deter- 
mine to use their utmost efforts to eliminate the 
Southern Pacific railroad and its agents from state 
and county politics. What else should be expected? 
Nothing will be left undone, no lies left untold, no 
tricks left unperformed, to make light of the move- 
ment now in- progress for the salvation of the state 
of California. But, thank God, the Southern Pacific 
political machine will soon learn that it has no 
trifling and inconsequential body of inexperienced 
boys to deal with — no^ "long hairs," no jealous, dis- 
gruntled or disappointed self-seek- 
Where Do ers. The body of men who have un- 
YOU Stand? dertaken the task of effecting per- 
fect organization for the undoing of 
the Southern Pacific political machine includes ex- 
perienced men of affairs who have fought long and 
valiantly for the restoration to the people of their 
God-given rights, but who, until this moment, 
have made the mistake of fighting as individuals. 
Henceforth they are to fight as an organization. The 
man who professes to be a friend of just ordinary 
good government and refuses to do everything 
within his power to further the interests of. the 
movement, working from the primaries up to the' 
last hour of the day of election, is not deserving of 
the name of good citizen; he is either the possessor 
of bad judgment or a moral coward. 

* * * 

In the face of everything which has transpired in 
San Francisco during the past six or eight months, 
William F. Herrin, the chief conspirator against 
the people of California, is working openly to se- 
cure control of the Republican County Central 
Committee 'in, that city. Herrin is the sort of 
tough-skinned man who cannot take a hint. More 
than all others combined, Herrin has debauched 
legislative bodies, state, county and municipal, in 



California ; has so manipulated conventions and 
elections as to elevate some of his 
Wellnigh most pliant tools to the bench ; has 
Unbelievable bought Governors ; has sent to the 
United States Senate men who obey 
the dictates of the Southern Pacific political bureau. 
That the people of San Francisco, where Herrin is 
better known than in any other part of the state 
and where his methods are familiar to every man, 
woman and child of reasonable intelligence, will 
tolerate Herrin and Herrinism in local politics 
longer, after the recent disclosures, is wellnigh un- 
believable. If they do all further sympathy for 
them will be wasted. Herrin may continue his con- 
trol of San Francisco, but he has reached the end of 
his rope so far as the domination of the State of 
California is concerned. 

* * * 

"The murderer takes a single life ; the corruption- 
ist in public life, whether he be bribe-giver or bribe- 
taker, strikes at the heart of the commonwealth," 
said Roosevelt. According to this philosophy, both 
bribe-giver and bribe-taker are greater enemies to 
society than the murderer. It sounds rather rough, 
but it is sound philosophy. The man who de- 
bauches the citizenship of any community by tempt- 
ing public officials to confer upon him 
The Worst special privileges to which he is not 
Criminal entitled under the law is but one de- 
gree removed from the traitor who sells 
out his country. A thief at heart, he endeavors — 
and too frequently with success — to persuade men 
in authority to take from the people and give to 
him that to which he is not entitled. This is theft, 
and the bribe-giver becomes equally culpable with 
the thief. You may hem and haw as much as you 
please, but this is the cold fact. A man or a news- 
paper that will defend a thief of this class performs 
a deed as reprehensible as the first act. 

* * * 

The conflicting news from Washington regarding 
the disposition of the naval forces is' disturbing. 
While changes in plans made are liable to occur 
at an time, it is to be hoped that the administration 
will not permit itself to be led into abandoning its 
intention to dispatch a strong fleet to Pacific waters 
— not that the Pacific coast stands in any particular 
need of defense, but simply and solely because fail- 
ure to carry out the designs 
Good for Their widely advertised a month or so 
Swelled Heads since, and commented upon in 
diplomatic circles in every Euro- 
pean country, might create the impression that 
Washington had "hedged" too closely. The Japan- 
ese swelled head would become immensely bigger 
if we should fail to carry out the first plan in regard 
to the disposition of a portion of our navy. The 



Pacific Outlook 



natural sequence of the change of plans intim 
will be the creation in tlie popular Japanese mind 
of the impression that America has been scared out 

of its wits over the possibility of a hostile demon- 
stration across the Pacific as the outcome of the 
proposed visit. 

* * * 

me and reasonable man will believe that the 
administration is afraid of Japan, so that cannot be 
the reason why this change in plans has been made, 
if the late report is true. If an error has been com- 
mitted, it is an error of judgment, we believe. But 
it is not too late to straighten out the matter and 
to take a step that will relieve the minds of every 
oilier nation of any impression it may have that 
the United States government is wobbling. We 
have as much right so to dispose of our floating 
angels of peace as we please — particularly if we 

keep them in waters adjacent to Ameri- 
But Bad can territory, as has been proposed — as 
for Peace any other nation has. For years our 

naval policy has been a bad one — that 
of keeping practically the entire fleet in Atlantic 
waters : and the sooner we recognize the Pacific 
ocean as equal in the importance of its demand with 
the Atlantic the sooner and the more certainly will 
peace between the United States and its Orienal 
neighbors be assured. If the month-old promise 
of the administration be not fulfilled, the Pacific 
coast reasonably may expect to hear the jeers of the 
little brown men with the voluminous craniums. 
Washington ought to be located at the Golden Gate 
or on San Pedro harbor for a year or two. Its 
range of vision would become greatly broadened. 

* * * 

Before the state election last fall Governor Gillett 
gave utterance to these words: "Let the guilty be 
punished !" The sentiment was and still is a worthy 
one. Mr. Gillett may have been referring to his 
friend Abraham Ruef. But the principle lying at 
the. foundation of this declaration may easily be 
stretched to mean, not only that the guilty may be 
punished, but that self confessed criminals holding 
public office through gubernatorial grace should be 
superseded by men in whom a reasonable propor- 
tion of the inhabitants of the state have some con- 
fidence. Take the case of Railroad Commissioner 
Andrew M. Wilson, for instance. Wilson testified 
in the Glass bribery case that during his term of 

office as supervisor of San Francisco 
Gillett, Nye he received two bribes aggregating 
and Wilson fifteen thousand dollars for his vote 

on the Home Telephone and the 
trolley franchises. Wilson is exactly the sort of man 
the Southern Pacific machine wants retained in of- 
fice. That tremendous power desires men whom 
it can easily handle. It has no use for others. If 
Governor Gillett retain Wilson in office after the 



recent disclosures it will prove to the most thought- 
less man that all the charges of being a Southern 
Pacific tool which have been laid at the Governor's 

door are fully justified. If the Governor had done 
the right thing he would have removed Wilson 
within twenty-four hours after his testimony had 
been given. Think of the Governor's hanging to a 
man like Wilson ami trying to get rid of a man like 
Controller Nye ! 

* * * 

The folly of not allowing the left hand to know 
what the right hand doeth is exemplified in the atti- 
tude of two of the Hearst publications, the San 
Francisco Examiner and the Cosmopolitan Maga- 
zine. In the August number of the Cosmopolitan 
there is an article on "The Liberating of San Fran- 
cisco," and another, by District Attorney Langdon, 
entitled "The Story of the Great Struggle." In the 
former Langdon is referred to as being possessed 
of "the Lincoln sort of civic virtue, simple and in- 
corruptible." As to Heney this article 
Hearst, the declares that he is "the ablest of prose- 
Chameleon tutors." And further, "as a matter of 
fact the motives of Spreckels are as 
high as any that ever actuated a citizen, and he 
sticks to his task with a courage and a tenacity that 
have no touch of meanness." The other picture, 
drawn upon the pages of the Examiner after Hearst 
arrived in San Francisco, is familiar to most news- 
paper readers on the coast. And the marvel still is 
that there are on earth reasonably intelligent men 
who still believe in the sincerity of William Ran- 
dolph Hearst ! The cheap, transparent demagogue ! 

* * * 

The attack of Hearst's San Francisco daily on the 
graft prosecution ought to be, ultimately, one of 
the best things that could happen. Like the arrant 
demagogue that he is, Hearst came to San Fran- 
cisco hoping, for selfish ends, to curry favor with a 
certain class of people by pandering to their preju- 
dices or wishes and by playing on their ignorance 
or passions. That Hearst regularly has sold the 

influence of both his California 
Hearst papers is a statement that will ad- 

Takes a Hand mit of no argument. The facts 

are too well and too widely 
known. He is an especially dangerous specimen of 
demagogue because of his wealth and ownership of 
newspapers of wide circulation, and further because 
of his financial ability to hire able and active male 
human beings — we will not insult manhood by call- 
ing them men — to execute his perfidious schemes. 
Hearst's alliance with Harriman. too, is so 
thoroughly proven by a complete chain of circum- 
stantial evidence that in it we are able to discern 
something of the motives which actuate him in his 
attack upon the prosecution. 



6 



Pacific Outlook 



To those who may be influenced even slightly by 
the latest Hearst outbreak or who may waver for 
one instant in their devotion to -the cause for which 
Spreckels and Heney are contending so valiantly 
and against such great odds, we commend for con- 
sideration an abstract from the speech delivered by 
Elihu Root at Utica, N. Y., on November 1 of last 
year. This was printed in the Pacific Outlook 
two weeks ago. Some time since Hearst in- 
stituted libel proceedings against a number of 

papers which reproduced this speech, 
The Livery or this particular portion of it, and he 
He Wears may adopt similar measures for the 

punishment of the Pacific Outlook. 
We believe it to be the duty of every decent pub- 
lication, daily, weekly or monthly, to do everything 
in its power to array Hearst in the attire to which 
his shameful career entitles him — the livery of the 
allied corporations and the rich grafters for whom 
he is acting as editor-attorney. And we are willing 
to take our chances of punishment at the hands of 
the law for our part in keeping constantly before 
the public the grave menace to the health of the 
body politic to be found in the public utterances of . 
Hearst and Hearst's hired men. 

* * * 

While it. does not seem possible that the voters of 
Los Angeles will refuse to make the appropriation 
necessary for the increase in the public school facili- 
ties of this city, the daily press should keep the 
matter before them constantly so that all possibility 
of contrary action shall be obviated. Dr. Moore, 
superintendent of schools, the members of the 
Board of Education and all others familiar with the 

situation know that the quarter of a 

Burden to million of dollars asked for the increase 

Nobody in the number of school buildings is 

an absolute necessity. The tax will 
be but five cents on each hundred dollars of valua- 
tion, a burden to nobody. It is a notorious fact that 
this city has not permitted — simply through neglect 
— the development of its school facilities at any- 
thing like the rate at which the city has grown dur- 
ing the past five or six years. The additional school 
buildings and the improvement of those already in 
existence are as essential to the welfare of the city 
as is the new water supply that we are to have. 

* * * 

Mayor Harper's ideas in regard to inspection are 
to be commended, as a general proposition. Inspec- 
tion is the essence of good city government. The 
value of keeping an official eye upon the various 
branches of city government, and especially of 
watching work under contracts to which the city is 
a party, has been demonstrated by the work of th* 
city oil inspector. Rigid inspection frequently pre- 



vents fraud and graft which, without inspection, 
might easily be perpetrated. 
Essence of But like every other good 

Good Government thing, there is danger that the 
policy may be brought into 
ridicule by being made too much of a hobby and 
pushed to an undesirable extreme. If Mayor Har- 
per is able to carry out his plan for widespread in- 
spection without carrying the idea into fields where 
it is not necessary, he will be doing a great public 
service. He is filling the position of chief inspector 
himself, and it is to be hoped that he will keep his 
eyes roaming over the entire field, in the meantime 
considering the general welfare and forgetting that 
there is such a thing as a Democratic party in Los 
Angeles whose fences require inspection and repair. 

* * * 

Then there is the work of inspection performed 
under the direction of the Board of Health. Here- 
in we have another splendid example of the neces- 
sity of rigid inspection, Within the past week offi- 
cials of the health department have visited numer- 
ous bake shops and restaurants, following up the 
crusade after the "comeback" a la Russell, where 
the conditions have been found to be utterly dis- 
gusting. Without the power of inspecting and 
regulating the conduct of such places as these the 

health of the city would be in con- 
Education and stant danger. Fortunately the 
Punishment proprietors of the best restaurants 

in the city are willing to co-oper- 
ate heartily with the health department to the end 
that the sources of complaint may be abridged, if 
not entirely done away with. The officials of the 
Board of Health declare .that the work they are do- 
ing is intended more as an educator than for the 
punishment of offenders against the laws. The 
policy is a good one, but if it be found that violators 
of the laws are too obstinate the interests of the 
public demand that they shall be punished after 
repeated warnings fail to correct the evils of which 
complaint is made. 

* * * 

"No little comment was caused about the council 
chamber by the sudden appearance of Champ Vance, 
'lobbyist extraordinary' for the gas company, who 
arrived at the city hall breathless within ten min- 
utes after the discussion began in the council and 
called Councilman Clampitt outside," says the Ex- 
press in concluding its account of the council meet- 
ing at which the matter of the assessment of the 
Los Angeles Gas and Electric Company was con- 
sidered. It is really too bad that Councilman Clam- 
pitt stood pat on the proposition to reduce the as- 
sessment against the gas company only to find, after 
stultifying himself by voting against the interests 
>f the people at large, that the reduction was il- 



Pacific Outlook 



lampitl professes a n to 

nd in" with tin- better element 
Clampitt's in the community, but when the op- 
Opportunity portunit) presents itself to do some- 
thing practical, as in the matter of 
this nt, lie usually falls down hard. Air. 

Clampitt is a man of intelligence, in spite of the 
fact that he frequently treats in a jesting manner 
serious matters considered by the council. There is 
no doubt whatever that he knew that the people of 
his ward and of the whole city wanted to compel 
the gas trust to pay it- proportionate share of the 
expenses of running the city, and he must have 
known that the proposed reduction of four hundred 
thousand dollars meant practically a gift to the 
trust of the amount of the tax on that amount of 
property. Mr. Clampitt may awaken some sunny 
California morning to find in circulation an instru- 
ment in writing asking for his recall from public 
life. He should pin in his hat this motto: "It is 
better to be safe than to be sorry." Mr. Clampitt 
has a rare opportunity to become known as a useful 
citizen. We wonder what path he has chosen. 

* * * 

If. through inactivity or indifference. District At- 
torney Fredericks permit the ice trust to remain in 
business in defiance of the stringent Cartwright anti- 
trust law. he will disgrace the office he fills. While 
Captain Fredericks has not always exhibited a dis- 
position to punish corporations violating the law, 
the people have not felt called upon to criticise him 
very harshly because of the fact that, as a rule, the 
operations of these combinations have not resulted 

in raising the prices of the necessi- 

Go After ties of life to the point where their 

the Ice Trust use is practically prohibited to many ; 

but if the full force of the depart- 
ment of the public prosecutor is not brought to 
bear upon this especially vicious form of monopoly 
— especially vicious in that it results in an intoler- 
able increase in the price of ice in the hot season — 
it will indicate that something is radically wrong 
with that department of government. The duty of 
Captain Fredericks is plain, if the ice trust fulfill 
its promise to raise prices, as announced Wednes- 
day. There should be Ho hemming and hawing 
over the issue. 

* * * 

If certain active club women of Los Angeles 
actually go to work to raise money for the defense 
of the woman who shot and killed George Bennett 
the only decent action which can be taken by the 
organizations of which they may be members will 
be to ask their resignations instanter, and, that fail- 
ing, to expel them. Bennett was murdered by a 
woman who, in the first place, beguiled him from 



the bo his famil; ome time afterward 

the two lived together ill, 
Maudlin The woman knew her place. She 

Sentimentality fully realized that, regardless of 
the possible weakness of the man, 

she and -he alone was to determine whether she 
should become the prime factor in the breaking up 
of the family of her victim. Sentimental twaddle 
which actuates a decent woman to attempt to cir- 
cumvent justice in such a case as this deserves 
scant consideration at the hands of others. Every 
club woman who is anticipating following the dic- 
tates of a maudlin sentimentality in this instance 
should first try to put herself in the place of the 
wife of George Bennett. 

* * * 

Los Angeles is not the only city in the country 
in which a determined fight against the unlovely 
billboard is being waged. The movement is rapid- 
ly becoming general throughout the country. The 
Iowa state legislature recently took up the question 
with the result that it gave to city officials the right 
to prohibit the erection of billboards. New York- 
City, Atlantic City, Boston, Pittsburg 
Billboard and other large cities are endeavoring 
Nuisance to accomplish the same thing, through 
legislation, which is aimed at by the 
better class of citizens. The attack made against 
this form of nuisance in New York has assumed 
even a more vigorous aspect than in Los Angeles. 
The city, through its corporation counsel, has en- 
tered several suits against one of the big billboard 
companies, and that department appears deter- 
mined to carry the cases to the highest court, if 
necessary, to maintain its contention that this form 
of nuisance must go. 

* * * 

The efforts of Varney & Green to render the 
erection of billboards legal should call forth a 
course of action on the part of the legal depart- 
ment of Los Angeles fully as determined as that 
followed by the New York authorities. Varney & 
Green argue that the recent ordinance taxing bill- 
boards is void because it is uncertain and that it 
discriminates between people who use sign boards 
for advertising purposes. They also claim that 
the ordinance, if allowed to stand, will 
To the drive them out of business. If that is 
Woodpile! the case it is to be hoped that the con- 
tention of the legal department of the 
city may be made to hold, not simply for the sake 
of driving Varney & Green out of business, but that 
every billboard in Los Angeles may be driven to 
seek refuge in the wood pile. It is a huge joke that 
a city like Los Angeles, which advertises itself as 
one of the most attractive places of residence- in the 
country and which is now planning to become 
known as "the Paris of America." may not abolish 



Pacific Outlook 



such an abomination as its unsightly billboards if it 
please. 

* * * 

The blacklisting system so long in vogue in the 
office of the Los Angeles Times frequently' results 
in the embarrassment and chagrin of the various 
hard working members of the reportorial force. 
This is illustrated by a recent incident in which a 
former attache of that paper, now enjoying to an 
unlimited degree the hatred of the Times, figured. 
When announcement was made last week that at 
the regular Saturday luncheon of the City Club 
Charles D. Willard, secretary of the 
The Times's Municipal League, would speak on 

Blacklist the Galveston idea in municipal gov- 
ernment, the city editor of the Times 
assigned one of the reporters to the duty of "cover- 
ing" the event. The data desire'd were secured with 
little trouble and turned over to the city editor. Just 
what transpired thereafter is not difficult to imagine 
when it is known that the report of the address was 
not printed. The Times's blacklist includes the 
name of Mr. Willard, to whom it never refers now- 
adays except, in derision, as "Citizen Fixit". Con- 
se'quently everything that Mr. Willard says or does 
is tabooed when the general is on deck. 

* * * 

This narrow policy of the Times frequently re- 
sults in the creation of situations that are ludicrous. 
The episode of Saturday is an instance. Not only 
this, but by adhering to its blacklisting policy the 
Times very frequently fails to publish news of im- 
portance to its readers. Anything in the nature of 
news, however important it may be, is either con- 
signed to the waste basket or mutilated in a most 

inartistic fashion if, in the telling, 

Its Effect the writer has allowed himself to 

on the News violate the one great unwritten law 

laid down by the general — the law 
that the Times's blacklist shall really blacklist. 
Through strict adherence to this silly rule, the 
Times was placed in a position where it could not 
publish an account of an address by an expert on a 
subject of vital interest to every advocate of good 
government. In the meantime those who know 
Secretary Willard realize how deeply he must feel 
the "punishment" meted out by the general ! 

* * * 

The Non-Partisan members of the City Council 
cannot be sidetracked from their determination to 
effect a retrenchment in municipal expenses. After 
a spirited debate, at the last meeting they succeeded 
in cutting down the payroll for services performed 
in getting out the annual tax list, enacting an ordi- 
nance which puts an end to the practice of having 
the same work done twice, once in the office of the 



city clerk and once in the office of the tax col- 
lector. The old system of double 
Retrenchment work has been in vogue so long that 
the Rule it has come to be accepted as a ne- 
cessity. Nevertheless there is prob- 
ably not a single city official who, in the conduct of 
his private business, would arrange his work as it 
has been conducted by the city in this respect hereto- 
fore. With the city on the verge of temporary 
bankruptcy it is well to cut down every possible 
item of expense. There will be less profligacy in 
the matter of money expenditure from this time for- 
ward if the gentlemen at the president's right — 
bare one — Councilman Clampitt — have their way. 

* * * 

The employment by the new Board of Highway 
Commissioners of A. E. Loder to be chief engineer 
in charge of the construction of the proposed high- 
way system of Los Angeles county is to be com- 
mended from every viewpoint. Mr. Loder is an 
expert in roadmaking. He has built more miles of 
scientific roads than an other man of his age in the 
United States. While attached to the public roads 

office of the Department of Agricul- 
Making a ture he enjoyed facilities for learning 
Good Start scientific methods of roadmaking that 

are not available in any other depart- 
ment of government or private undertaking. The 
commission has done well to employ him to super- 
vise the work in hand. Now if it will see to it that 
no playing of politics is permitted in connection with 
the administration of any portion of the three-mil- 
lion-doliar fund, we shall have a highway system 
economically constructed and a distinct credit to 
the county and the state. 

* * * 

It is to be presumed that the commission intends 
to make provision for the construction of highways 
adapted primarily to the facilitation of trade between 
the various points in the county rather than to the 
greater comfort of automobilists. The Venice* 
Chamber of Commerce however, appears to take 
the view that one of the great considerations should 
be the construction of asphalt roads for the use of 
autoists, its interest lying chiefly in construction of 
an asphalt road not less than twenty feet wide from 

the paved portion of Washington 
Beware of street to Venice. The highway corn- 
Favoritism mission will do well to hesitate before 

authorizing the preliminary work to- 
ward the construction of even ten miles of road 
which will be better than any other ten-mile strip. 
If it begin by showing favoritism toward Venice 
or any other particular locality it surely will incur 
the risk of just censure. The sort of road that is 
good enough for Long Beach should be good enough 
for Venice ; the sort that is good enough for Glen- 



Pacific Outlook 



dora i>r Covina should be good enough for Redondo. 
It will not do to give Venice a first-class asphalt 
pavement and build a narrower macadam road to 
some other point equally deserving of consideration. 

* * * 

If the process of curing proves to be as successful 
as the process of growing lias been, the culture oi 

tobacco may soon become one of the profitable forms 

of agriculture in Southern California. I. C. Rein- 
hard's experiment with the "weed" on his property 
No. 1521 Harvard boulevard is said to have been 
satisfactory so far as it has gone. He has demon- 
strated that large leaves can be produced in this 
section, ami that the product is free from the insect 
pest with which growers in other states have to 

contend. While these pests may ar- 

Tobacco rive in time, if tobacco-growing be- 

Possibilities come one of the recognized industries 

of Southern California, there is no 
reason why they cannot be treated here as success- 
fully as in Missouri, Connecticut or New York, 
where much of our tobacco comes from. If Mr. 
Reinhard's experiment prove that tobacco of good 
quality 1 may be grown here, the agricultural wealth 
of Southern California may be increased several mil- 
lions of dollars annually. All smokers will anxious- 
ly await the curing of the Reinhard leaves. May 
they be free from the peppery and cabbageleafy 
sting and aroma which make the product of the val- 
ley of the Schoharie, in New York state, a thing to 
be avoided by smokers possessed of delicate nos- 
trils! 

* * * 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 



Charles F. Aked, D. D., Noted New York Divine 

What right have we to luxury while others starve 
in sight of plenty? What of the myriads of our 
brethren pent up in mean streets, prisoners of 
counting house and shop, slaves of the mill and 
mine, the poor and heavy laden of every nameless 
class? Christianity cannot rest while such mortals 
live, disfranchised of their right to rest and happi- 
ness. While such poverty remains, while such evil 
conditions sadden and appall us, what right have 
we to our holidays, to our happiness?' Can we sit at 
our feast blindfold, or dare we open our eyes? 
What right have we to any feast while our brothers 
starve in sight of plenty? None, if our lives are 
wrong, if we are living for ourselves, thinking, 
planning, toiling, accumulating, enjoying, for our- 
selves. Let us have done with the solemn hy- 
pocrisies of conventional worship. There is no 
virtue in misery. Melancholy is not righteous- 
ness. We shall not go to heaven for our tears or to 
hell for our smiles. 



have a good deal to do with crimes againsl women 
and children. You will notice thai these particular 

crimes are done by foreigners and not by American 
citizens, but by fellows who can't talk the English 
language. It is this wave of immigration that land- 
hundreds and thousands, partly criminals and part- 
ly' fellows that don't know what liberty means and 
don't care: don't know our customs and cannot 
speak the English language and arc the scum of 
Europe mostly. Why this immigration is allowed 
on the east coast ami not on the west coast seems 
to he and I guess you all know is simply a ques- 
tion of votes. The solution of the problem is to 
prohibit immigration, and when we come to ex- 
ecuting immigration laws it is found to be prac- 
tically impossible to deport people under the laws. 



John Burroughs, the Great Naturalist 

You may know the true observer, not by the big 
things he sees, but by the little things; and then 
not by the things he sees with effort and premedita- 
tion, but by his effortless, unpremeditated seeing — 
the quick, spontaneous action of his mind in the 
presence of natural objects. Everybody sees the 
big things, and anybody can go out with note-book 
and opera-glass and make a dead set at the birds, 
or can go into northern forests and interview guides 
and trappers and Indians, and stare in at the door 
of the school of the woods. None of these things 
evince powers of observation ; they only evince in- 
dustry and intention. In fact, born observers are 
about as rare as born poets. Plenty of men can see 
straight and report straight what they see; but the 
men who see what others miss, who see quickly and 
surely, who have the detective eye, like Sherlock 
Holmes, who "get the drop," so to speak, on every 
object, who see minutely and who see whole, are 
rare indeed. President Roosevelt comes as near 
fulfilling this ideal as any man I have known. His 
mind moves with wonderful celerity, and yet as an 
observer he is very cautious, jumps to.no hastv con- 
clusions. 



Police Commissioner Bingham 

There is another very important thing about this 
crime business. I don't want to say anything that 
would be indiscreet, but unquestionablv the enor- 
mous hoiales of immigrants that are coming here 



George Spring Merriam, Author 

Man's essential problem is to fit himself to the 
world in which he exists. In Spencer's phrase the 
success of each creature lies in adapting itself to its 
environment. Now man's knowledge of his environ- 
ment must begin where it touches him closest. For 
example, a motorman's first and essential, knowl- 
edge of electricity — "the juice," as he calls it — is 
only the practical handling of controller and brake 
and the various gear of his car. From that he .may 
work up, if he can, till he knows all that Edison 
knows: he may go on, if his brain suffices, as far as 
the latest found and subtlest laws of force. * * * 
The tiger seeking its prey; the bird building-its nest, 
may each follow the law of its kind and look no 
further. But man. accepting goodness as his own 
aim and law. goes on to ask: What is the sig- 
nificance of the universe itself, and what is my re- 
lation to its interior, ruling power? The answer he 
has essayed to give through his religious creeds has 
been refined from the savage's crude personification 
of natural forces, up through various idealizations, 
till our fathers shaped their conception as an in- 
finite power; a goodness like that displayed in 
Jesus, but armed with the resources of omnipotence. 
Now, the disbelief in miracle deprives Jesus of any 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



credentials other than belong to simple human 
goodness ; and the observation of actual procedure, 
with the vast prevalence of suffering and wrong 
seems to nullify the idea of a supreme beneficence. 
And so we see a prevailing mood of agnosticism ; 
with sometimes a less rational but very human 
mood in which some lingering belief in God with no 
belief in his goodness prompts fierce revolt against 
a Creator who torments and mocks His creatures. 

Can we put aside for a moment our traditional 
creeds, our agnosticism hardening into denial, our 
passionate revolt — and try to discern the affirma- 
tions of human experience at its ripest and best? 

The observation, as by a spectator, of the general 
movement of the outer world, indicates some uni- 
versal order or unity, traceable by us in many of its 
details, but inscrutable as to its interior force or 
final outcome. 

Questioning now man's inner world, we find that 
the practice of moral obedience yields a deep peace, 
blent with the spur of aspiration. Faithful to duty, 
man feels himself at home in the universe. The 
philosophy in which Kant interpreted conscience 
as God's revelation in man ; the poetry in which 
Wordsworth addresses duty as "Stern daughter of 
the voice of God," — these are expressions of a wide 
human experience. Without literalizing them, we 
may take that "peace which passeth understanding" 
— the peace born of duty nobly done — as the token 
to the faithful man that he is rightly filling his 
place in the universe. , In some sense it is a link 
with the ruling power. * * * , 

Lived out to its fullest and best life naturally 
becomes religious. Doubt itself may be religious. 
Humility is surely so. It is the voice of religious 
humility that says : "Canst thou by searching find 
out God? Canst thou find out the Almighty unto 
perfection ? It is as high as heaven ; what canst 
thou do?" But no less genuine and from a profound- 
er experience, is the assurance : "If I ascend up into 
heaven, thou art there ; if I make my bed in hell, be- 
hold, thou are there. If I .take the wings of the 
morning, and dwell in the utmost parts of the sea ; 
even there shall thy hand lead me, and thy right 
hand shall hold me." And the inner secret is given 
in the utterance : "Beloved, let us love one another, 
for love is of God, and every one that loveth is born 
of God and knoweth God." 
* * * 

Government by Commission 
C. D. Willard, Secretary of the Municipal League, 
spoke last Saturday before the City Club on the 
subject of the "Galveston System, or City Govern- 
ment by Commission." The club tables were crowd- 
ed full, and the close attention paid to the speaker 
by the audience showed the interest taken in the 
question of the best form of city government. As 
the matter of charter reconstruction is now a live 
topic before the people of Los Angeles, and as a 
commission is soon to be appointed to develop a 
plan of city government on which the public will 
vote in 1908, everything that will contribute to a 
better understanding of the subject is welcomed by 
our people. 

Mr. Willard sketched briefly the changes that 
have taken place in the theory of city government 
in this country, showing how in the beginning our 
cities were controlled by town meetings or by the 



boards of trustees, after the English model, and 
how, as cities grew in strength and importance, it 
was thought necessary to elect the mayor and 
other general city officers. Affecting this change 
also was the theory of the separation of legislative 
and executive functions, which the speaker main- 
tained was little more than a barren and formal 
distinction in the practical administration of a city. 
The third stage of development was the federal 
system, in which the elective officers were limited 
to council and maydr, the general scheme being 
similar to that of the national government. 

The catastrophe at Galveston brought the people 
of that city to a condition of mind where they de- 
sired a business administration of their municipal 
affairs. It was a matter of life and death to them. 
They were willing to turn over all the powers of 
government to a commission of five, who were to 
run the city as a corporation board would run the 
affairs of the business intrusted to them. 

This plan had met with great success in the six 
years it has been under trial in Galveston, the 
speaker said, but it was open to the objection that 
it was a form of despotism, was un-democratic and 
un-American, and gave powers that might involve 
the city in ruin if they fell into bad hands. 

A modification of the Galveston plan, which had 
recently been adopted by the people of Des Moines, 
Iowa, seemed to Mr. Willard to embody, all the ad- 
vantages of a business administration with all the 
protection that was needed against the power being 
misused. The Des Moines system includes the ini- 
tiative, referendum and recall, which puts the entire 
structure on a democratic basis and prevents its use 
for the ambition or the evil purposes of any man or 
set of men. 

Mr. Willard expressed some doubt as to the feasi- 
bility of undertaking the Des Moines plan for this 
city at the present time, while it is yet in an ex- 
perimental stage, but declared his belief that the 
time must come when a large percentage of Ameri- 
can cities would work out a plan very much after 
this model, which would make a veritable business 
administration possible, as it. was not under the 
present political system. 

* * * 

Prof. James's Success 

Porter Garnett, who writes the "History, Fiction 
and the Point of View" department of the Pacific 
Monthly, finds in George Wharton James's "The 
Wonders of the Colorado Desert," recently pub- 
lished by Little Brown & Co., material for one of 
the most scathing reviews ever given any book by 
a California author. The Pacific Outlook shrinks 
from being like the little boy who heard a lot of bad 
words and then repeated them often so that, all the 
other little boys could share his shocked state of 
mind, but a few quotations may be illuminating to 
persons interested in the local literary output. Mr. 
James has made a success, if success may be count- 
ed by financial returns, in the writing of books that 
deal with distinctly western subjects and now, af- 
ter he has been accepted as a real author, Mr. Gar- 
nett says : 

"Ask any culturine in Southern California if 
George Wharton James is a literary man, or ask 
the reverend professor himself and you will receive 
a reply in the affirmative mingled with shocked sur- 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



Any one reading the two volumes ol 'The 
Wonders of the ( tesert' for the informa- 

tion it contains will glean a great deal, much of 
which is interesting. The author has not made the 
rt any less wonderful than it really is, but lias 
treated the subject in extenso, devoting separate 
chapters to the manifold and multiform phasi 
desert life, with excursions into many departments 

of science. Any one reading these volumes with a 
view of appraising their literary worth will come 
away from the rather formidable task, as 1 have 
come away from it. unrewarded. On page fifty- 
four of Volume I there i- a paragraph, descriptive 
of the Colorado river, that is marked, or rather 
touched, by some literary grace, but as it is the 
only passage so touched in five hundred and thirty- 
five pages, it must he set down as an accident. 
There are abundant attempts on the author's part 
to produce high-toned literature, but these are in- 
variably marked (not merely touched) by inapti- 
tude. Nothing shows the lack of literary quality 
in the writing of the Reverend Professor James so 
clearly as the contrast between it and the numerous 
quotations he makes from that graceful writer, 
Clarence King. 

''But the most striking thing about these two 
volumes is the persistence with which the personal- 
ity of the author is obtruded throughout the whole. 
The most conspicuous thing in the Colorado Desert 
is George Wharton James. 'The Wonders of 
George Wharton James' would be a better title for 
the work. Now such persistent intrusion of a 
writer's personality in a work on natural science 
annoys, at first, then irritates, then disgusts. The 
reverend professor is eternally telling his readers 
about his physical strength, his fortitude, and his 
emotions. He appears to be a sort of a stuffed and 
prosey Walt Whitman. I can offer my readers no 
greater delectation than that which lies implicit in 
the following excerpts, selected to show some of 
the literary and spiritual vagaries of our author. 
Those who have sensed the significance of Chester- 
ton's magnificent phrase: 'But speaking in the in- 
terest of the public,' will catch the humor of these 
quotations. Others I am afraid will not : 

" 'With me there is such a sense of the presence 
of God in the desert that I always feel the farther 
I go, the farther I get from the influence of men 
and the nearer I get to God. 

' 'The wife of one of Chicago's distinguished 
clergy-men so fully appreciates the beauty of the 
diamond rattlesnake (Crotalus ruber. Cope) that 
she is able to cast aside all feminine antipathy to 
the reptile and use its beautiful skin as an adorn- 
ment for insertion in a dress waist. 

" T never look upon the mountains without re- 
calling the story of the sentinel angel with the flam- 
ing sword placed at the Garden of Eden after the 
expulsion of man and woman for their disobedi- 
ence. * * * Oh ! blessed mountains of allure- 
ment, of suggestion, of provocation to the higher 
life, well worthy are you of the honored position you 
occupv — to stand at the gateway of the Garden of 
God. " 

" T can compare the noises he ('the desert tor- 
toise) makes to nothing more exact than the inartic- 
ulate "guggling" of a young baby hen content with 
full feeding. 

"Note in the above the exact use of 'exact'. Else- 



where Mr. James speaks of a "beaut) capabh of full 

comprehension only by those soul-, etc." lie also 
-peaks of what the road-runner "does do." lie has 
"lady friends" and speaks of "a moment or two" 
without explaining how long a period "two" mo- 
ments are. hut lie is most naif when he sa\-: 

"T think much of the burro and his intelligence. 
T gladly claim kinship with him. though that means 
that T write myself clown an ass.' 

"It is all in the point of view." 

Evidently Mr. Porter Garnett and Mr. George 
Wharton James have not the same literary point 
of view. Moreover, it would seem from the unkind 
reference to the "culturines" of Southern California 
that the reviewer has a prejudice against the brand 
of writing produced by the authors of this part of 
the state. Can it be possible that he has made Mr. 
James the scapegoat for all the literary sins com- 
mitted south of the Tehachepi? Our sins are many, 
if they are to be measured by the criticism meted 
out to Mr. James. 

* * * 

Force of Sea "Waves 

The nature and effect of sea waves has been a 
subject of study by engineers engaged in the con- 
struction of works along the coasts. Sea waves re- 
sult from wind pressure. The minimum wind velo- 
cit that can generate them is said to be two feet a 
second, and the waves thus produced measure 
three-fourths of an inch from crest to crest. 

A violent gale is said to have produced a wave 
2,590 feet from crest to crest. The size of a wave is 
dependent upon the velocity of the wind and the 
"fetch" or distance along which propagation is con- 
tinued, while the duration of the wind, the water 
depth and shore conformation are to be considered 
in a study of the effect waves may have upon the 
shore. Sometimes, says the Tacoma Ledger, there 
are two systems of waves in motion at the same 
time, one superimposed upon another, or they may 
travel in different directions. When two systems 
travelling in different directions meet they produce 
the large occasional waves. Deep water waves are 
usually from 160 feet to 320 feet long and last from 
six to eight "seconds. It is rare, according to stu- 
dents. of waves, that a length of 520 feet is exceeded. 

One can understand from the figures given by 
the dynamometer, which measures the force of 
waves, why it is that powerfully built ships are 
soon pounded to pieces when they become fast on a 
rock. Half the energy of a wave is kinetic, while 
the other half is potential. The kinetic energy is 
due to the revolution of the water particles, while 
the potential energy is due to the elevation of the 
centre of gravity of the mass of water comprising 
the crest above the centre of gravity of the corre- 
sponding mass of still water. 

An article on the form and energy of sea waves 
in the Contract Journal gives, among other figures, 
the following, which present some idea of the great 
force of waves. "The total energy of a deep water 
wave 250 feet in length and 15 feet in height is 221 
foot tons a foot of wave crest, and of one 500 feet in 
length and 20 feet in height, 793.7 foot tons a foot. 
Only one-half of the total energy is transmitted for- 
ward with the wave form, that half being the poten- 
tial energy." 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



NATIONS WINTER CELEPvY PATCH 



Product of the Orange County "Peatlands" Controls American MarKet 



By Lanier Bartlett 



\Yho would guess that the Southern California 
county named "Orange", which, true to its name, 
ships 2000 cars of the golden citrus fruit annually, 
makes more money from its prosaic butter and eggs 
than from its poetry-suggesting oranges; or that 
(further to illustrate the eminently practical turn of 
mind of this rich little farmer) celery is the county's 
most celebrated product? 

A practical region, in very truth, is this smallest 
of the southern counties, despite its many un- 
matched natural beauties ; and within its limits is a 
splendid diversity, a resourcefulness almost beyond 
belief, with some striking anomalies enlivening the 
varied face of it all. It irrigates its vast fruit 
orchards and drains its rich celery lands. The or- 
ange grower, busy at his work of conducting the 
mountain streams to his groves through miles and 
miles of concrete canals, looks down from his up- 
lands upon his peatland neighbor burrowing into 
his heavy soil with drainage tiles, to coax the water 
away. 

Here, in this little county of only 720 square 
miles, are cultivated 440,000 citrus fruit trees, 302,- 
000 deciduous fruit and walnut trees and 45,000 
olive trees, and yet its eggs and butter are worth 
more to the shire than any of its other industries. 
The very celery it raises is worth more than its 2000 
carloads of precious oranges. From within its 
borders are shipped annually such strangely con- 
trasting products as these: 10,000 cars of native 
petroleum and 500,000 rose bushes (from one rose 
ranch) for eastern nurserymen ! Half the famous 
English walnut crop of California comes from with- 
in a radius of twenty miles of Santa Ana, the county 
seat; and these noble groves stand up from a verit- 
able green sea of lowly peanut vines, whose record 
of output, in comparison with the rest of the state, 
is about that of the walnuts. Widespread bee 
ranches (producing over 600 tons of honey a year) 
look down from the sage-sweet foothills upon ap- 
parently limitless green alfalfa of unsurpassed low- 
lands; 70,000 acres of grain, in single parcels of 
thousands of acres, form a sweeping background 
to innumerable tiny vegetable and berry gardens, 
where intensive cultivation is carried to the point 
of exquisiteness. (Orange county sold $250,000 
worth of strawberries during the past season). A 
fine sea coast, holding at least one well-known ship- 
ping point and many pleaure resorts, stretches be- 
low commanding mountains; and down toward that 
shore, in a marvelous corner, is the celery. Yes, 
hereabout everything leads back to the celery, back 
to the Peatlands, where 5700 acres of low, rippling 
plumes proclaim the most wonderful example of a 
wonderful bit of a county's diversity. 

It is like a glimpse of the Netherlands, this wide, 
moist flatness with rows and rows and rows of low 
plants converging in the -damp distance, the toiling 
people along the dikes stalking boldlv, with exag- 
gerated strides against the misty sky of the winter 
harvest months, and the stiff, unfaltering, naked 
poplars marching in their inevitable single file 



across the moor. Sometimes a train looms over the 
edge from the outer world and seems to crawl along 
the hem of the sky as if thus to avoid the boggy 
places ; and the freight cars stand out great and 
grotesque and mirage-like, with vivid slits of light 
slicing them one from another. 

There are many strangely contrasting expressions 
on the perplexing face of California ; but nowhere 
will you notice a more striking transition than when 
you come down from the dry-aired, irrigated orange 
grove region of the upper slopes to these sodden, 
these apparently uninspired lands of the calm, 
pearly-gray morning and evening mists- — not a 
sombre region, but seemingly a passionless one, 
perfectly resigned to its damp, flat sameness, its al- 
most painful plainness of feature of which it is for- 
ever kept in consciousness by the brilliant-counten- 
anced mountain land above it; melancholy, yet only 
passively, not passionately, so, as are some really 
sombre, forbidding moorlands. The thin, whitish 
yellow of bleaching celery tops se&ms the only 
brightening color that the heavy soil has the secret 
of producing, or any hope of seeing. Yet, under- 
neath, this land that looks so heavy-hearted is in- 
spired with life, has the passion of production, the 
hopefulness of ambition born of an inner stirring 
of strength and the faith that impels ceaseless -en- 
deavor, so that, be the seasons wet or dry or what 
they may on other soils, this land never lags in its 
service to the men who lay knowing hands upon it. 
And the brightest color it can produce really is not 
the thin whitish yellow of bleached celery tops, but 
the warm, rich reddish yellow of minted gold which 
these men with the knowing hands pluck from the 
heart of the celery beneath the pale tops. And 
these men do not call the region melancholy. 

This little corner of Orange county known as 
the "Peatlands" has revolutionized the celery trade 
of the United States. It has made celery a popular 
winter relish over all the civilized portion of the 
continent north of Mexico by making it possible 
for the people to eat it fresh from the field. Before, 
over this immense region celery was little thought 
of in the winter except as a seasoning for cooked 
dishes, for then only the limp, lifeless cold storage 
product, kept over from the summer, was obtainable. 
Offhand, you probably would not say that celery 
plays any great part in the country's fresh food 
supply ; "a little celery goes a long way," is the usual 
thought in connection with this vegetable. But in 
this case — this wonderful Peatlands case — a lot of 
celery goes a long way ; a tremendous lot of celery 
a very long way, and yet the nation's demand is 
not satisfied. 

There are 5700 acres of celery in this district, 
from which were shipped, during the season of 
1905-6, 3000 carloads, a matter of 2,868,491 dozen 
bunches, amounting to something over $750,000. 

From these fields every considerable city of the 
United States and Canada derives its winter supply 
of table celery. Through the latter part of Novem- 
ber, all of December and January and the early part 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



ebruary Orange county's celery is eaten in ;ill 
the cent. pulation in Anglo-Saxon North 

America, practically to the exclusion of all other 
celery. In fact, there i> no other fresh celery of any 
Milt in the eastern and northern markets during 
the period mentioned. Summer grown cold storage 
celery (most of it from Michigan) is resorted to for 
use in cooking, but the crisp winter-grown Califor- 
nia product claims the market as its own as a table 
relish. 

this is what has made these "Peatlands" fa- 
mous, and its workers rich — winter crops. It is not 
the number of acres planted nor the number of car- 
loads shipped (though these figures are striking 
enough), but the fact that crisp, newly-cut celery 
can be shipped into frost-bound states all winter 
long, that makes this district the most unique and 
valuable in the history of celery culture. At present 
these 5700 precious acres are in the hands of about 
150 growers, and this handful of men — plain, hard- 
working farmers, every one holding his own plot 



ket absolutely. As for the earl) spring competition 
of Florida, it has nol yet cut much figure with the 
California industry. Florida's entire celerj output 

for last season is said to havi Ween 60O carloads, 

against the 3000 from this California county. 

This district may he said to have created its Own 

market, for before its development celery was used 
verj sparingly in the winter in the cold states. Cold 
Storage celery lacks that life and pungent crispness 
which alone makes celery a popular uncooked 
relish; and unless it is fresh from the field the 
average person cares little for it except as a season- 
ing in cooking. The fresh winter product from 
California created a taste for the vegetable, coming, 
as it did, just at the time when all vegetables are the 
scarcest, and the demand increased as fast as the 
acreage was extended, so that, up to the present 
time at least, the price-shattering point of over- 
production has never been reached. 

This "Peatland" district (although it is not pro- 
perly peatland) is said to be the richest parcel of 










The pungent product of these thousands of damp acres' 



of ground — controls the winter celery trade of the 
immense territory already mentioned. They seem 
the Lord's chosen farmers, these particular celery" 
folk ; the soft climate of Southern California and the 
rich wet peatlands, so seldom found in combination, 
provide them with their heaviest crops in the dead 
of what elsewhere is winter — December, January 
and February — and allow them to plant and plan 
and count their change in the common season when 
any old farmer with wet, peatish land, anywhere, 
can raise celery and ship it to an overflowing sum- 
mer market. 

Here shipments begin about November first and 
continue until about April first. Such early celery 
as Florida raises begins to go to market along in 
February and the Michigan crop ends the first of 
November, so that right into the heart of the mid- 
winter celery famine come, as if by special arrange- 
ment of Providence, the great trainloads sent out 
lo the California "Peatlanders," claiming the mar- 



land for its size in the United States. The produc- 
ing celery land is held at from $500 to $750 an 
acre, $600 being a good average price in first-class 
locations. The growers are banded together in an 
organization known as the Celery Growers' Asso- 
ciation of Orange County, which handles the entire 
output. The headquarters of the association are at 
Smeltzer, the "capital'' of the "Peatlands," whither, 
throughout the winter, the pungent product of these 
thousands of damp acres is hauled in an endless 
caravan of immense wagons stacked mountain high 
with crates, from the open tops of which wave, like 
signals of triumphant prosperity, the green and yel- 
low celery plumes. The air is charged with the 
redolent odor of the plant, and when a breeze puffs 
across the plumed fields and wagons there is wafted 
into the lungs of the eager newcomer great, grateful 
draughts of celery tonic, as healthful and refreshing 
as ever was distilled in a laborator. 

The Southern Pacific branch line, built for the 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



sole purpose of handling this crop, terminates at 
this point, and here the solid celery trains, already 
famous for their unique cargoes and their quick 
despatch to eastern points, are made up and sent 
speeding to the centers of population north and 
east. Here, in an immense packing house, the hun- 
dreds of thousands of crates that are supplied to the 
individual growers through the association are made, 
and in the harvest months a line of wide wagons is 
always loading here with "empties". These are 
piled up or strewn about through the flat fields in 
grotesque array, so that, against the smooth, level 
horizon, they rise like tottering skeleton castles, or, 
when strewn in unbroken rows, stretch away like 
long low trestles conveying one may not be sure 
just what sort of rickety trails above the twinkling 
celery sea. And always past these outgoing wagons 
there comes pressing in the loaded caravan, whose 
separate burdens edge up one by one in turn to the 
receiving car. 

This capital of Celeryland was named for the pio- 
neer of the industry, the late D. C. Smeltzer, a pro- 
duce dealer of Kansas City who, some fourteen 
years ago, inaugurated the growing of winter celery 
in this district. 

In this land of celery the word "dozen" is the 
basis of all speech. Life revolves around "a dozen 
bunches". The dozen is the unit of computation 
in crop talk. A crate holds from seven to eight 
bunches of celery, and an acre of land produces 
about 200 cratefuls, or from 1400 to 1500 dozen 
bunches. There are three recognized grades of the 
product, for which the growers receive, respectively, 
seventeen, twenty and twenty-five cents per dozen 
bunches. The entire crop will average twenty cents 
per dozen bunches. The cost of actual production 
is about forty dollars an acre. The land is held in 
parcels of about thirty acres. . 

The peculiar association, in this region, of real 
peatland with areas of a wet clay that is itself very 
favorable to the celery plant, makes it possible for 
these growers to extend their output through the 
long season which they enjoy. The real peatland 
forces the plant into quick maturity, and from this 
class of soil comes the early winter crop ; while in 
the clay soil development is slower, though none the 
less perfect, and such fields produce the March 
crop. Also, the clay soil has better "holding" quali- 
ties than the peat, so that when its crop develops 
before the grower wishes to harvest it, he can 
"bank" it and leave it for a considerable time un- 
harmed. The peat rots celery that is held in it over 
its natural time. The growers have learned, how- 
ever, that it is all but imperative that this clay land 
be tile drained from beneath ; and it is almost all 
prepared in this way. In fact, most of the celery 
acreage is being equipped with a system of drainage"; 
and the piles of smooth reddish tiles strewn over 
some field that is under course of preparation add 
vivid, welcome touches of color to the dun land- 
scape. 

Celery seed is sown from the last of March to 
the first of May, and the transplanting begins the 
middle of June, continuing until September. The 
sowing is done in specially prepared propagating 
beds, each, grower reserving a corner of his field 
for this purpose unless he arranges to buy plants 
from a neighbor. One acre of seed bed will plant 
forty acres of field, so that the amounj: of land re- 



ii Largest and Finest Stock of Furniture in the WtsC 

fi EDTlME COMFORT 

XX is seldom given proper consideration. Restful sleep is essential 
Vf to everyone. It cannot be obtained in a poor bed with a hard 
mattress or broken springs. A good bed is a necessity, not a 
luxury. It adds to your comfort as well as your health. *SO. B. Baker 
mattresses aie the acme of perfection in this line. We are the agents 
here. 

l3Furitihire<I©/ 

640-646 SOUTH MILL ST. " 



May L. Evans and Vera E. Herrmann 

Public Stenographers 
Notaries Public .... 

Appointments can be made for Evening or Sunday Work 

m.™ „ J Home F 6904 
r-nones-( Ma ; n 5|54 

CONVENIENT TO ALL PRINCIPAL HOTELS 
Opposite Angelus, one block from Van Nuys, one block from Alexan- 
dria, one block from Westminster, in the center 
of the business district 

Suite Four Hundred and Ten Union Trust Building 




Pure Air is Curing 

Consumption 



In diseases of the Lungs, Heart and Kidneys, you 
need more oxygen than you are getting. Pure air 
without dangerous drafts, secured by sleeping in the 
cottage built for health. 

WALKER PORTABLE COTTAGE 
On exhibition, rear 420 W- 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Sci sso r s. Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 



Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



PHONE HOME A 4432 
4th St. Store 



F 7671 ; MAIN 4604 

SPRING ST. STORE 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 



328 W. 



FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 
4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST. 



Pacific Outlook 



16 



quired for propagation i'>r the entire district is in- 

• leralile. 

leryland presents an interesting phase of the 
California labor problem. It is overrun with Jap- 
anese. Scattered everywhere over tbe moorland are 
little cabins swarming with these dwarfish brown 
men. In tbis very proscribed area, wbere tbere are 
but 150 white growers, there are at least 500 Jap- 
anese, some directly concerned in the profits of the 
industry through furnishing their labor in the field 
on the percentage basis; others working as paid 
hands. The growers openly acknowledge that the 
industry could not be carried on profitably on the 
present system without Japanese labor. On the 
other hand, the thoughtful men of the celery asso- 
ciation say that they see, or rather feel (for it seems 
to be a sort of instinctive, indescribable feeling of 
distrust, an inner consciousness of dislike, rather 
than a cold-blooded deduction of the reason, which 
first makes uneasy the American living in enforced 
contact with Japanese) a distinct menace to the 
white growers in the insinuating presence of these 
wily, secretive, persistent Orientals. One of these 
growers intimated to the writer that while, from 
the standpoint of the cost of production, Japanese 
labor seemed absolutely necessary to the continu- 
ance of the industry, still he could not escape from 
the constantly growing consciousness within himself 
that the Japanese are a menace to him and his 
neighbors and the state at large; that their presump- 
tious attitude, insinuating methods, craftiness, dis- 
honesty and often overbearing manner in business 
dealings and even in everyday intercourse in the 
fields would in time make their presence insupport- 
able to the white grower, and that if a break in the 
white growers' organization ever should allow the 
Japanese to gain possession of any considerable 
portion of the celery lands (as is very evidently the 
desire and aim of the Japanese to do, ultimate!)) 
the white man would be entirely crowded out. 

Nowhere in California did the shortage of rail- 
road freight cars during the past winter have a 
more serious effect than in the celery district. It is 
imperative that the winter crop shall be moved as 
fast as it is cut in order to reap the full advantage 
that the brief midwinter market affords; and the 
car supply failed at the critical period, necessitat- 
ing the wholesale cancelling of eastern orders. It is 
estimated by the manager of the celery association 
that the loss to the growers through this cause 
amounted to between $150,000 and $200,000. 

The "Peatlands" lie about eight miles southwest 
of Santa Ana. one of the most prosperous and beau- 
tiful of the smaller cities of the state. It has a 
population of eight or nine thousand, and supplies 
all the necessities and refinements of a metropolis 
to the variegated and immensely rich region over 
which it reigns. The city lies thirty-three'miles be- 
low Los Angeles and is connected with the latter 
by a double-tracked electric railroad with frequent 
service. 

* * * 

A Marvel of Beauty 

With tin: August number of Sunset subscribers 
receive "The Road of a Thousand Wonders," the 
most beautiful book ever issued as a reminder of 
the charm of California scenery. As every one 
knows the "road of a thousand wonders" is the 



The L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 



("Writing in SigHl) 




Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue Free 

L. CEL M. Alexander CO. Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 
131 South Broad-way. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones Home l906~Main 5959 




BETWEEN 



..Galifornia?h"eEast.. 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 



'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los. Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at 6ot South Spring St. 




MACDONALD'S HA1KMES3ING COLLEGE Wanted- 

Women 
Students 

TO LEARN A PROFITABLE BUSINESS 

The demand for our graduates is far greater than 
the supply. We want bright young women to take 
the Summer Course — Special rates for July, August 
and September. 

MacDONALD, 204 MERCANTILE PLACE, 
Los Angeles, Cal. Upstairs near Spring St. 



BOOKSBOIGHT 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN IS55 



1G 



Pacific Outlook 



Coast Line-Shasta route of the Southern Pacific 
company from Los Angeles through San Francisco 
to Portland, a journey of thirteen hundred miles. 

The book is gorgeously illustrated in color. Its 
frontispiece is a map of California into which are 
introduced here and there thumb nail pictures of 
places of interest. Seventy-two pages, each bearing 
an exquisitely colored picture or two, follow. These 
illustrations are reproductions of new pictures that 
are a pleasing change from those, alas ! too familiar 
to the residents of California. Some of the half tones 
are as beautiful as water colors and others have the 
strength of oil paintings. One of the noteworthy 
pictures represents two priests looking into the pool 
of the old fountain at the Santa Barbara mission. 
Another is the lighthouse at Point Concepcion. 
Monterey is well presented. The picture of the old 
custom house is worth the subscription price of the 
magazine, so is that of the San Carlo mission. Palo 



Alto and Stanford University, Burlingame, the Gold- 
en Gate and the new San Francisco — all receive at- 
tention. From San Francisco to Portland the most 
impressive mountain peaks, the deepest rivers and 
the most distinctive stretches of country inspire 
illustrations that are distinctly artistic. The letter 
press of the book is clear and the descriptive mat- 
ter is well written. The cover by W. H. Bull is a 
fine poster in color. 

* * * 

Nimrod — Are you fond of hunting? Gyer — it all 
depends. Nimrod — Depends on what? Gyer — 
Whether I am hunting game or a collar-button — 
Chicago Daily News. 

* * * 

"How is the new house you're building coining 
on?" "Very well. We've just reached the second 
mortgage." — Life. 



JS> 



THE CLASP OF FRIENDSHIP 



Case of Southern Nevada and Los Angeles is .Approaching a CourtsHip 



The slight coolness and possible misunder- 
standing between the great mining region of South- 
ern Nevada and Los Angeles are. rapidly taking 
their places as things of the past. The social and 
commercial atmosphere is being clarified. The re- 
cent visit of representative business men of this 
city to the mining centers of Nevada was productive 
of good results, in that it brought the inhabitants 
of the two sections in closer contact, gave the peo- 
ple of Los Angeles a better conception of the won- 
derful country which so suddenly sprang into life 
six or seven years ago and helped to remove a 
growing misapprehension on the part of the people 
of Nevada as to the attitude of the people of Los 
Angeles. 

If anything more were needed to bring the peo- 
ple of these two marvelous regions of territory to- 
gether it will be found in the visit of the leading 
editors of Nevada, the new Golden State, to this 
city, an event scheduled for next September. The 
outcome of this jaunt of the men who are telling 
the rest of the world of the wonders of the new El- 
dorado should be most happy to all parties con- 
cerned. 

A few days ago H. A. McCraney, for many years 
one of the most widely known editors of California, 
came to Los Angeles to pave the way for the ap- 
proach of the newspaper men of Nevada. Mr. Mc- 
Graney organized the California Press Association 
years ago and served as its president for some time. 
He took an active interest in politics in this state 
for many years and, knowing where Nevadans 
should look for friends, naturally came to Los An- 
geles. As editor of the Manhattan Times, which he 
has owned and edited for the past year, he occupies 
a big place in the newspaper world of Nevada. He 
organized the Nevada Editorial Association, which 
numbers among its members thirty-four of the 
fifty-five editors in the state. The rest are rapidly 
coming into the fold. 

Mr. McCranev expects that between thirty and 
fifty of the editors of his state will visit Los An- 
geles with him next September. He says that prob- 
ably fewer than ten of these men have ever been to 



Los Angeles. They, and the rest of the inhabitants 
of our neighboring state, are beginning to realize 
that Los Angeles is the natural trading center for 
that section ; and not only this, it is the one city in 
the country which the majority of the mine opera- 
tors and others who are building up fortunes as 
the result of the development of the mines want 
to make their permanent home. The great ma- 
joroity of these men went to Nevada for one pur- 
pose — the pursuit of wealth. Naturally enough, af- 
ter their desires in this particular have been grati- 
fied they will turn to the most desirable place of 
residence in the country as their future home. 
They are willing to give Los Angeles the greater 
share of their trade — to give it all to this city, pro- 
vided we have the goods to deliver — and in return 
they make the reasonable request that the people of 
this city shall invest some of their surplus money 
in the mining fields of that state. 

Mining in Nevada has ceased to be an experi- 
ment. That state is bound to be, in the opinion of 
disinterested experts, the most prolific producer of 
gold in the United States. There is in this city 
enough surplus capital, producing no material in- 
come, to develop twenty big and successful mining 
camps in Nevada — this, at least, is the opinion of 
Mr. McCraney. The building of these towns would 
mean an increase in population of from seventy-five 
to a hundred thousand inhabitants, whose neces- 
sities of life would be purchased chiefly, if not en- 
tirely, in Los Angeles. 

The logical outcome of the creation of a more 
friendly spirit toward the miners of Nevada on the 
part of the people of Los Angeles will be increasing 
trade and, ultimately, the removal to this city of 
men of wealth who will contribute to our material 
prosperity. The Nevada offering is worthy of care- 
ful consideration. Men who dig into the earth in 
the search for its mineral wealth make pretty good 
friends ; and the more friends of that class Los An- 
geles can get the better off the city will be. 

The portrait of Mr. McCraney which appears on 
the cover of this issue of the Pacific Outlook is from 
a photograph by Mojonier. 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



"Land Conscience" 

"( ipportunity make- the land thief as well as any 
other variety, and for years the Government 
couraged thieverj — for does not non-enforcement 
of the law encourage crime? Not only did the 
Government long wink at fraud, but Congress more 
than unci- invited it by enacting laws facilitating it," 
says Lute Pease in the August Pacific Monthlj in 
discussing "the \\ est and the President's land 
policies." 

"Much has been said about 'the land conscience.' 
'People, however honest in other matters, never 
have considered it wrong to violate dead-letter laws 
it' by SO doing they could set land from the Govern- 
ment.' 'Everybody did it and nothing was said.' 
'Everybody has the right to locate a hundred and 
sixty aeres. and how is the Government concerned 
with wdiat is done with the land?' 'Whose business 
is it. if before we located we had agreed to sell the 
land to somebod else after we got patent? What's 
it to the ( iovernment if somebody did let us have 
the money to "prove up", with the understanding 
that we'll give a deed to it some time? What is the 
difference, as regards the wrong, whether we sell 
• ir agree to sell the land in advance of patent and 
in deciding to sell it ten years later? If it's a crime 
to sell it at one time, it ought to be at the other.' 

" 'Why.' once exclaimed to me a venerable West- 
ern lawyer of great attainments, 'nobody is robbed 
— there is no robbery. The locator gets value for 
the exercise of his right as a citizen ; the Govern- 
ment gets paid its price for the land, and the land 
goes to the man or company that sooner or later 
puts it in use, while the state begins to get_ annual 
taxes, which it did not get before; so nobody is 
hurt, but everybody profits, though,' he added, 'of 
course perjury may have been suborned — but that 
was sanctioned by common usage in land matters." 

"This is the 'larfd conscience.' We should soon 
have a 'pocketbook conscience,' if no one were 
punished for pocket-picking, and the custodians of 
pocketbooks winked at the pickers and smiling held 
hands aloft for the looter's greater convenience." 

* * * 

Dr. Jordan's Rivals 
News that the opposition to President David 
Starr Jordan of Stanford University has developed 
to a point where the ambitions of Professor Angel, 
head of the department of physiology, are freely 
discussed will be of interest to hundreds of alumni. 
It is not likely that Dr. Jordan will be superseded 
or that he will quietly submit to any indignities 
from persons ambitious to occupy his place at the 
head of the university which he has built up so 
rapidly. He is not an old man and the insinuation 
that he has passed the days of his best usefulness 
is absurd. 

* * * 

In Honor of Secretary Garfield 
The reception to be held Saturday evening in the 
Chamber of Commerce in honor of James R. Gar- 
field. Secretary of the Interior, will bring together 
leading business men of the city who are deeply 
interested in the government's investigations of 
condition- in the West. Accompanying Air. Gar- 
field are Gifford Pinchot, chief of the bureau of for- 
estry and F. H. Newell, director of the United States 
reclamation service. Mr. Garfield is the house 
guest of ltis mother at her home in Pasadena. 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach Doth 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE: 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



PIERCE ®> CO. 



KODAK FINISHING 

..GO TO... 

127 W. 6th St, 



£6e (gtucntortum QSaffl anb Cotfef (parfore 

^^^^™^^^^^^^"«^^™ For Ladies and Gentlemen ™^^^™^^^™ 1 ^^^^^^™ 
900 AUDITORIUM BU1L1NG 

FIFTH AND OLIVE STS. 



Telephone Home F 5024 



MRS. L. PENNRICH 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



RattlesnaKe Ridge Reformers 

The Rattlesnake Ridge Reform League, organ- 
ized several years ago at Rattlesnake Ridge, Ari- 
zona (not on the map but very much in evidence 
in the imagination), has been so misrepresented be- 
fore the public that one of its members has en- 
deavored to set forth its aims and aspirations .so 
clearly that he who runs, rides a bucking broncho 
or walks may read. For several months, writes 
this member of the league, a clique of mollycoddles 
has been trying by underhand methods to thwart 
the avowed purposes of our league. It has been the 
practice of this clique about once or twice a month 
to put forward some Eastern dude to bloviate about ' 
George Washington, the Declaration of Independ- 
ence and the American Constitution, old time rub- 
bish altogether out of harmony with the spirit of 
modern things. On July 4 some deplorable donkey 
from Virginia started to speak of John Marshall 
and the Supreme Court. Brimstone Bill, our chair- 
man of the committee on cemeteries, hurled a volley 
of oaths and. an empty beer glass (not a full glass, 
as some plutocratic organs assert) at the head of 
the speaker. The platform was soon cleared. Sul- 
phur Cy then mounted the platform and moved that 
we make a clean sweep of the mollycoddles. Car- 
ried with a rush. They got the usual two minutes 
in which to leave the hall, never to return. Six or 
seven men got up and started for the door. One or 
two jumped through a window. 

When the hall had been cleared of all save the 
progressive element, Tarantula Tom mounted the 
platform, drew from some point of concealment 
a live rattlesnake, whose head he cracked off in real 
cowboy style. There was a tremendous outburst 
of applause and several revolver shots were fired 
at the ceiling, but that there was any general dis- 
order is wholly untrue. Tarantula Tom then moved 
that the league get down to business. Motion sec- 
onded by Bowieknife Ben, Coyote Charlie and 
others. Ace High Flanders delivered a short but 
powerful oration on Humbugs. Grant, Lee and 
Sherman were shown up as bloodless fakers, men 
who, as generally admitted, went through a war 
without firing a single hoss pistol. George Wash- 
ington was unmasked. The name of Thomas Jef- 
ferson raised a huge laugh. The word hell is never 
used during meetings of our league, Wall Street 
being substituted. The orator then said he believed 
that all candidates for the Presidency, as well as 
for the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
should be compelled to take a rigid examination. 
The league indorsed this view and framed the fol- 
lowing questions : 

"1. How would you season mollycoddles? 

"2. How would you detect a nature faker without put- 
ting him under the microscope 

"3. State fully your relations, past and present, with 
the Ananias Association. 

"4. Is the association of the owl, the rattlesnake and 
the prairie dog anything in the nature of a combine? 

"5. In mounting a fiery bronco is it an indication of 
white liver to hold the reins? 

State fully your method of killing snakes. 

After catching a grizzly bear how would you skin 



"6. 



7- 

him? 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY 

To Purchase 

WALL PAPER 

Owing to the late arrival of 

Spring Shipment, 

We are caught 

OVERSTOCKED 

These Goods 

MUST BE PAID FOR 

To turn them into cash welll <£ 
have inaugurated a JJj 

DISCOUNT SALE 

Thousands of rolls at actual 

Manufacturers' Prices 

Fine importations direct from Germany. England, 

Belgium and France. Also a complete line of 

Domestic Goods. 

This is not a clearing up sale of old stock. Every- 
thing has been selected with the greatest care. 

We always have a force of expert Workmen 
And positively guarantee all work satisfactory 

L. A. Wall Paper Co. 

900 S. BROADWAY 

Free estimates on Papering, Tinting, Frescoing and 

Painting 
Main 2087 F7779 



It is no longer a question of Can it be 
Done?" The Starr Wave Motor has produced 
by the ocean waves, as beautiful electric lights 
as have ever been made by any other power. 
Send us your name and address and we will mail 
to you, free, a circular telling how it is done. 
Our stock now selling at 50 cents will soon be 
selling at $1.00. 

Los Angeles WavePower & Electric Co . 
224 H. W. Hellman Building 

LOS ANGELES — :— CALIFORNIA 



"8. How would you write ur> a maneatiiig tiger? 

"9. Is it a square deal to hitch a frog to a hook and 
throw him where a bass is liable to swallow him? 

"10. Why does a coyote take to flight when pursued 
by a troop of cavalry and forty hounds?" 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



Pacific Outlook 




Burnett-Ballou Nuptials 
i >f more than local interest was the marriage last 
Saturday afternoon of Mrs. Lucia Burnett and Sid- 
ney M. r.allou, justice of the Supreme Court of 
Hawaii. The ceremony was performed at the home 
of the bride's brother-in-law and sister. Mr. and 
Mrs. Harry C. Turner, with whom she made the 
trip to Honolulu last winter. The house was beauti- 
fully decorated with flowers and greenery, yellow 
and white forming the color scheme. The Rev. J. 
J. Wilkins, D. D., dean of St. Paul's Pro-cathedral, 
read the marriage service in the presence of fifty 
friends and relatives. After a brief visit in Santa 
Barbara, Justice and Mrs. Ballou sailed for Hawaii 
this week. Justice Ballou, who has been an island 
resident for twelve years, was appointed to the 
Supreme Bench by President Roosevelt. He is a 
native of Boston and a graduate of Harvard. Mrs. 
Ballou was born in Kentucky and has passed much 
of her life in Los Angeles. 



Will Lecture in Mexico 

Dr. and Mrs. E. C. Moore left Los Angeles last 
Wednesday for a trip through Mexico. They were 
accompanied by Mrs. F. R. Frost and Frank F. 
Bunker, assistant superintendent of schools. Dr. 
Moore has been invited by the Mexican government 
to deliver a series of lectures on the school system 
of California. These lectures will be in the nature 
of a reciprocal courtesy for the lectures given last 
year by Senor Chavez, under secretary of education 
in Mexico, before the Berkeley summer school, and 
are in line with the government policy looking to- 
ward the establishment of closer relations between 
the United States and Mexico. Dr. Moore and 
party will return about August 31. 



Love at First Sight 

Dr. Truman Eslin, who is remembered by many 
residents of exclusive Riverside, last week became 
a victim of love at first sight and was married to 
Miss Katherine G. Raymond of Frankfort, Ken- 
tucky, on the day that he was introduced to her. 
When it is known that Dr. Eslin has become a dis- 
ciple of Elbert Hubbard, who preaches many start- 
ling theories on affinities and twin souls, this hasty 
choice of a life partner will not be altogether un- 
explainable. Dr. Eslin met his wife at a convention 
of the Roycrofters and the marriage ceremony was 
performed in the chapel at East Aurora, N. Y. 
Since the bridegroom inherited a fortune he has 
lived in Washington, D. C. 



A Leader in Philanthropies 

Mrs. Randolph Miner, who is widely known as a 
social leader in the most exclusive circles of Los 
Angeles, has been identified with many philan- 
thropies and charities. As a member of the Assist- 
ance League, an organization which does a tre- 
mendous amount of good so quietly that few per- 
sons know of its broad activities, Mrs. Miner will 



ie relied on for important work in directing the 
society vaudeville performance which will be given 
November 1 for the purpose of establishing a fund 
for the winter's work. 'Phis society vaudeville will 
be the first brilliant event of the season. The fact 
that it is given by the Assistance League insures 
its success, and Mrs. Miner's resourcefulness and 
originality will be shown in many ways. Last win- 
ter she directed several of the most noteworthy en- 
tertainments, and, like those in her own home, they 
were marked by distinction, novelty and pic- 
turesqueness. So far, the plans for the vaudeville 
performance are kept from the public. It is under- 
stood that each member of the Assistance League 
will be responsible for a "stunt" and that there is 




Mrs. Randolph Miner 

much friendly rivalry in the matter of obtaining 
sketches and musical features which will be so good 
that professionals will have cause for envy. Among 
the members of the league are: Mrs. Hancock Ban- 
ning, Mrs. Walter Newhall, Mrs. Wesley Clark, 
Mrs. Michael J. Connell, Mrs. Cosmo Morgan and 
Mrs. Mary Longstreet. The most popular debu- 
tantes and the most talented young men in society 
will be among the top liners and performers. 



Mrs. W. D. Babcock was hostess Tuesday after- 
noon at a midsummer tea given at her summer 
home, Hermosa Beach. Fifty guests enjoyed the 



20 



Pacific Outlook 



day at the picturesque summer cottage. Among 
those invited were : Mesdames" George Goldsmith, 
Leonora Schultze, William John Scholl, M. J. 
Hutchinson; J. S. Porter, John J. Abrahamson, Cos- 
mo Morgan, Frank Phillips, Bagley, Walter E. 
Tyler, O. H. Burbridge, H. L. Story, J. B. Lippin- 
cott, Arthur Ballard, Oliver C. Bryant, Don T. Har- 
rison, W. P. Dunham, Frank P. Fay, F. R. Frost, 
Frank B. Silverwood, J. S. McCormick, Alton H. 
Smith, Jules Kaufrman, James J. Warren, Pierre 
Mason, Stoddard Jess, I: N. Grasse, Fred L. Baker, 
E. C. Andrews, C. B. Nichols, Matthew S. Robert- 
son, O. P. Clark, H. N. Mabery, George P. P. 
Thresher, J. M. Russell, Ross Mahan and Clark. 

Announcement of the engagement of Lieutenant 
Ulysses S. Grant III and Miss Edith Root, daugh- 
ter of the Secretary of State and Mrs. Elihu Root, 
caused surprise this week. Lieutenant Grant is a 
young man who has inherited from his famous 
grandfather a mind with a special military bent. He 
has been studying engineering at the War College 
in Washington after his noteworthy career at West 
Point. Miss Root is described as a girl of far more 
poise and sincerity than the usual society girl. Al- 
though her father's distinguished position naturally 
throws her into the whirl of gay official life she de- 
votes herself as far as possible to serious things. 

William M. Mines, who was severely injured last 
Tuesday when a team attached to a heavy truck 
collided with a Westlake car, is at the Good Samari- 
tan hospital. While he sustained serious injuries, 
five of his ribs and his breast bone being broken, 
he is likely to recover rapidly as he is a vigorous 
man in the early prime of life. In the same accident 
Miss Blanche Adams, niece of Dr. William Z. Mc- 
Donald, No. 1305 West Adams street, was badly 
cut and bruised. A long laceration on her cheek 
may leave a sear. 

Mrs. Frank Gibson and her son, Hugh Gibson, 
have returned from their long residence abroad. 
They are now established in the Gibson home on 
Scarff street, but it is likely that Mr. Gibson soon 
will return to Europe. In the five years that he 
has been away he has been preparing for the diplo- 
matic service and recently passed examinations that 
will enable him to obtain a choice post. He is a 
linguist of unusual attainments. He is known also 
as a brilliant writer. 

After a long visit in Los Angeles Dr. and Mrs. 
Robert P. McReynolds have decided to make their 
future home in the city where Mrs. McReynolds, 
previous to her recent marriage, was one of the most 
popular girls in society. Dr. and Mrs. McReynolds 
were called West from their Philadelphia home by 
the serious illness of Mrs. McReynolds's father, the 
Rev. B. F. Coulter, who has been slowly conval- 
escing for many weeks. 

Miss Hazel L. Judd of La Jolla was married last 
week to Frank R. Adams, the Chicago playwright. 
The ceremony was performed in Milwaukee. The 
title of the bridegroom's drama, "The Time, The 
Place and The Girl", is said to have suggested 
rather an impromptu wedding. 

Roy Goodrich, who was city attorney of Phoenix, 
Arizona, during the period when the city took over 
the ownership of the waterworks system, is in Los 
Angeles, his former home, for a visit. He is ac- 
companied by Mrs. Goodrich, and they are quartered 



<^%^t S 



317-325 

S O. B R O AD WAY 



314- 3S 2 
So. Hill Street 



A. PUSENOT CO. 



'THe Store Beautiful" 

OUR BIG 



Is receiving almost every day 



For the interior adornment of fine homes. The more 
exacting and extensive your knowledge of DRAP- 
ERIES and ORIENTAL RUGS the more you will 
appreciate the superior taste displayed in the selec- 
tion of our Exclusive Styles for Fall. 

Jtast Received. 

Sew ies BatSa 

The design is entirely new, being made to match 
exactly the tiling of your bath room. In DELFT 
BLUE, PINK, CHERRY RED, DARK BLUE and 
DARK GREEN. Shown in 4 sizes. Priced as follows 
$1.50 $2.25 $3.00 $5.00 

SEE OUR FINE LINE OF ORIENTAL RUGS 
before purchasing. They are so reasonably priced. 



f 



Established 1887 



IB. 



onradi 



Just received a new line of solid 
silverware for the table; a great 
variety of exclusive designs in 
tea sets, salad bowls, etc. 



i Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C, H. Heard 

S. CONR.ADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

I 203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles, Cal 



ARTS AND 

MRS. 

Hand Painted China 

Hammered Metals 

Burnt and Modeled Leather 


CRAFTS SHOP 

C. D. WESTON 

Home Phone E 334S 

34-7 S- Broadway 



BJUamanaes? Iral&alatos = iwm 

BULLINC'S METHOD OF MUNICH for the treatment of diseases of the 
air passages-CATARRH, BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our lnhalatorium should he made bi all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send tor booklet 



409 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Phone F-1674 



PARLOR MILLINERY... 



eJIHs 



Miss Lillie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F 317S 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



at Hotel Melrose. \ graduate of Harvard Law 
ol, Mr. Goodrich has made a special stud) of 
tin- legal features of civic improvement, public 
ownership of public utilities and other matters "i a 
kindred nature. He was one of the hardest fighters 
against the movement for the admission >n Ari 
and New Mexico as a joint state last year, and as 
the result of his lal>'T> in the directions noted has 
become one of the most widely known lawyer- of 
Arizona. 

Friends of Miss Louise N T ixon Hill, who lefl Los 

Angeles in June with the Philharmonic Quintette, 
will rejoice over the news of her success. Miss 
Hill's ballads sung in costume were received everj 
where with much enthusiasm. After visits in Chi- 
cago and ■■titer eastern cities the talented young 
singer will return to Los Angeles early in the 
autumn. 

Mrs. LI. M. Russell and her daughter. Miss Eva 
Keating. No. 71S West Adams street, have returned 
from a two months' trip East. They passed several 
weeks in Xew York and then went to Atlantic 
City. Owing to the unsatisfactory condition of 
Mrs. Russell's health the European tour planned 
for tiie summer has been postponed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Booth will take possession 
of their recently- acquired home, Shadycroft, the 
handsome colonial mansion in Alhambra, Septem- 
ber i. This house, formerly owned by John I. 
Wiley, is most delightfully situated in the San 
Gabriel valley. It is surrounded by a garden com- 
prising one and one half acres. 

General Adna R. Chaffee, General Harrison Gray- 
Otis and Dr. \Y. Jarvis Barlow went to Idyllwild 
last Saturday with Arthur G. Wells. The party- 
traveled in Mr. Wells's private car to Hemet, where 
luncheon was served. An informal reception fol- 
lowed the luncheon. The trip to Idyllwild was 
made in an automobile. 

Mrs. Randall Hutchinson, No. 2817 Menlo ave- 
nue, gave a luncheon Wednesday in honor of Mrs. 
William Hawley, who has come to Los Angeles 
from Chicago, and Miss Julia Ruggles of New York 
City. Maidenhair ferns and sweet peas were used 
in decorating the table. Covers were laid for 
twenty-four. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Drake Ruddy, who have 
been making the tour through Italy and Switzer- 
land, are in Paris for a fortnight. Mrs. Ruddy 
caught cold in the Alps and was seriously ill in 
Heidelberg, but she has recovered her health and is 
preparing for a trip through France. 

Mrs. Leah J. Seeley with her daughter, Miss Ada 
Seeley, and her son, Walter E. Seeley, will return 
to her Los Angeles home August 15, from Ocean 
Park, where she has had a cottage for several weeks. 
Later the family will go to Catalina. 

Mrs. Randall Hutchinson has issued invitations 
for Monday afternoon when Miss Julia Ruggles of 
New York City, a talented dramatic reader, will 
give an interpretation of "The Merchant of Venice." 

Frederick Warde, who has many friends on the 
Pacific coast, is planning a winter "home which will 
be built in Santa Monica. 

Miss Edna Peyton, No. S57 Westlake avenue, 
gave a tea Thursday afternoon in honor of Miss 
Mabel ' iregorj and Miss Adele Cray, two California 



SUxMMER FICTION 



During vacation time "Something t" rc.nl" is an 
absolute essential you wouldn't be happy without it. 



The writers of snappy romance for summer con- 
sumption have been especially good to you this 
season. Dozens of the light fiction works here to 
choose from — just enough mental exercise in them 
for vacation time — brimfull of the elements you de- 
mand during your yearly relaxation. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURJISS & WELCH CO. 

252 S. SPRING ST. 
The Big Book Store Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 



*ii3i 


f^fHf & 


* tw$ 


^^pU4 


ft] Dragorv 


Trade Mark ,gr 
It & ~ 



Sing Fat Co., 



Inc. 



Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-19 South Broadway 

MAIN STORE U2I POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



Los Angeles 



OstricK Farm 



Opposite 

EAST LAKE PARI* 

5c Car Fare on City Cars 

City Salesroom 
324 S. Broadway 

Most Beautiful Feather Display Ever Made 

in Los Angeles 

Manufacturers' Prices 

We Repair, Redye and Recurl 

5 Acres of Gigantic 
— Birds — 





Visitors are Cordially Invited 



AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 



Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade, 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



girls who are students at Wellesley. Miss Gray, 
whose home is in Los Angeles, is passing- the sum- 
mer as the guest of Miss Peyton. Miss Gregory 
is now a resident of San Francisco but she lived in 
Los Angeles when she was a child. 

Mrs. L. J. McCormick and Mrs. A. H. S. Bird of 
Salt Lake City this week left the Hotel Van Nuys, 
where they have been passing several months, for 
Santa Barbara. They will be at the Hotel Potter 
until early autumn. 

Mrs. E. Pierpont of Nordhoff and her two sons 
made the trip to Los Angeles last week in their 
touring car. They passed several days at the Hotel 
Lankershim and then began a tour of the Southern 
.California resorts. 

Mrs. Charles C. Carpenter, No. 1153 West Twen- 
ty-seventh street, has been entertaining extensive- 
ly for her two cousins, Mrs. Hammond of Wash- 
ington, D. C. and Mrs. Semmes of the City of 
Mexico. 

Major and Mrs. Ben C. Truman and Miss Tru- 
man, who returned recently from a trip of many 
weeks through Mexico, will go to Lake Tahoe for 
a two months' visit. 

The wedding of Miss Inez V. Everett, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Everett No. 927 Beacon 
street, and Walter R. S. Home will take place 
August 14. 

Mrs. William A. Barker, No. 689 West Adams 
street, with her two sons, Lawrence and Everett, 
returned this week from a long trip through 
Europe. 

Colonel and Mrs. Epes Randolph came to Los 
Angeles in their private car last Monday. They 
were guests at the Hotel Van Nuys for several days. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Lippincott and family of No. 
1256 West Adams street are at Hermosa Beach, 
where they have taken a cottage for the summer. 

A. D. Myers, one of the successful mining men of 
Goldfield, passed the week at the Hotel Alexandria. 
Mr. Myers is building a home at Long Beach. 

Miss Anna Gist Rogers of Lexington, Ky., who 
has been visiting in Hollywood for the past three 
months, left Tuesday for the East. 

Mrs. Thomas McKee, No. 670 South Alvarado 
street, is visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Moore in Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. D. M. Riordan and her daughter, Miss 
Elizabeth Riordan, have gone to Laguna Beach for 
the month of August. 

Dr. and Mrs. Shelley Tolhurst will go to Cata- 
lina next week. They will be away during the 
month of August. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lee Bettner and Miss Bett- 
ner of Riverside are at the Hotel Redondo, Redondo 
Beach. . 

C. B. Boothe is enjoying an outdoor vacation. 
He is camping in the mountains near San Bernar- 
dino. 

Major and Mrs. John H. Norton and their daugh- 
ter, Miss Amy M. Norton, are at Shasta Springs. 

Mr. and Mrs. John S, Valleley have taken a cot- 
tage at Santa Monica for August. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson with their 
family started for the Shasta valley last Wednes- 



day. They will stop at one or two places on the 
way North. They will be absent six weeks. 

Mrs. Edward A. Featherstone has returned from 
a six weeks' visit in Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Van Giesen Posey have taken 
a cottage at Playa del Rey. 

Mr. and Mrs. Berthold Baruch will go to Denver 
for a brief midsummer trip. 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yoursel!. 




314 w 




Pacific Outlook 



23 



The Course of True Love 

Announcement this week that Maude Fealy, the 
dainty little American actress, had been marriei 
cretly to Louis Hugo Sherwin, a young newspaper 
man. awakened interest in Los Angeles, where both 
the bride and bridegroom have many friends. Mr. 
Sherwin is the son of Hugo Gorlitz, the famous 
manager who helped to make the fortunes of Pader- 
ewski, Kubelik and other musical stars. He lived 

in Los Angeles for several months. He was on the 
Staff of the Herald and later was with the Evening 
News. He left Los Angeles about two years ago to 
make a tour of Australia as Kuhelik's press agent. 
He is a handsome young fellow who makes friends 
readily. He has talent as a writer, anil the indigna- 
tion of Mrs. Margaret Fealy Cavallo, his new 
mother-in-law, appears to be unreasonable. Before 
her marriage to the Italian conductor of one of the 
theater orchestras in Denver, Mrs. Cavallo was 
head of a dramatic school. Upon her little daughter 
she lavished the most intense affection and she 
trained the child in roles that demanded dramatic 
power. Before she was in her "teens" Maude Fealy 
appeared as Juliet, Lady Macbeth and Rosalind and 
she proved herself a prodigy. It was chance, how- 
ever, that made the girl's first success. William 
Gillette was attracted by her precociousness, and 
before she was old enough to wear long dresses he 
gave her a leading part in one of his plays. Then 
in a 'World's Fair competition, owing to the activity 
of her press agent, she won, or rather, her photo- 
graph won the prize offered to the most beautiful 
girl in the United States. Later Miss Fealy became 
leading woman for E. S. Willard, William Collier 
and Richard Mansfield. Her highest attainment 
was to be chosen leading woman for Sir Henry 
Irving. These triumphs repaid the mother of the 
young actress for years of struggle. It was always 
the mother who was ambitious and those who knew 
the child, Maude Fealy, used to pity her because 
she was not often permitted to forget that a career 
had been planned for her. Naturally a marriage 
that may interfere with a future on the stage would 
be a terrible disappointment to Mrs. Cavallo, but 
doubtless when the first shock is past the aspiring 
mother will realize that the assistance of a hus- 
band, a father-in-law and a mother-in-law who are 
in the "profession'' may hasten the starring days 
of Maude' Fealy Sherwin. Madame May Sherwin, 
the bridegroom's mother, whose name he bears, is 
a celebrated prima donna. Mr. and Mrs. Louis 



Hugo Sherwin are now n , Denver, where the bride- 
groom is employed on a newspaper. The wedding 

I' " ik place July 15. 

* * * 

Noted War Correspondent 

Richard Barry, son of Mr. and Mrs. George A. 

Harry of Monrovia, has the honor of being one of 
the eleven American war correspondents recently 
decorated by the Emperor of Japan. Although San 
Francisco counts Mr. Barry as its own, he belongs 
to Los Angeles and has called this city home for 
the last five or six years. He was the most for- 
tunate of all the army of war correspondents inas- 
much as, after frequent disappointments, he had the 
good luck to be with the Third Army at the time 
of the capitulation of Port Arthur. His courage and 
patience had enabled him to remain at the front 
through all the weary weeks of the siege and he was 
the only writer of English left with the army when 
the great event took place. He was enabled to 
hasten homeward with the biggest "scoop'' of the 
campaign and made a reputation that has put him 
in the front rank of American magazine contribu- 
tors. Mr. Barry is now in New York, where he 
has passed much of his time since his return from 
the trip around the world which completed his sec- 
ond journey to Japan. The emperor's decoration, so 
well earned by numerous brilliant feats in gathering 
war news, is a gold bronze medal about the size of 
a twenty-dollar gold piece. It bestows upon the re- 
cipient the Imperial Order of the Crown. 

* * * 

Need of the Blind 

Mrs. Frances Fearne, who has come to Los An- 
geles to further the work started in aid of the blind 
by the Queen of Roumania, has spoken several 
times this week in Pasadena. She has succeeded in 
starting a fund for the establishment of a news- 
paper for the blind to be printed from a press re- 
cently invented in Roumania. If sufficient money can 
be obtained, the newspaper will be established in Los 
Angeles. Mrs. Fearne has interested many promi- 
nent persons in the project and Miss Foley has done 
much to assist her. It is estimated that at present 
there are 100,000 blind persons in the United States. 
As about seventy-five per cent of those afflicted lose 
their sight after they are twenty, they are barred 
from the state institutions and their need of instruc- 
tion is so great that a movement to supply means 
for the education of adults is urgent. 




Studebaker Junior 



The children's delight. Get one for the 
little folks. Fitted with both pole and 
shafts. 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 

Studebaker Agency 

Wagons Carriages Implements 

200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. 
Los Angeles ^ jt> California 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



Famous Equal Suffrag'ist 

Mrs. Rachel Foster Avery, corresponding secre- 
tary of the National _ Suffrage Association and one 
of the secretaries of the International Suffrage As- 
sociation, will arrive in Los Angeles August 8. She 
will be the house guest of her longtime friend, Mrs. 
iVI. B. Foster, No. 800 North Evergreen avenue. 
The leading suffragists of the city are arranging a 
reception for the distinguished visitor, who will 
remain in Southern California two weeks. She is 
now in San Francsico, where she is being much en- 
tertained. 

For twenty years Mrs. Avery has been corre- 
sponding secretary of the National Suffrage Asso- 
ciation, and, although she is still in the forties, she 
has the distinction of being, since the death of Miss 
Susan B. Anthony, the suffragist longest active in 
the battle for political equality. She began her re- 
form work when she was a girl of thirteen and has 
accomplished much in the various state campaigns 
in which she has been a leader. Mrs. Foster is a 
polished speaker who has the power of imparting 
enthusiasm to her audiences. She is logical, bril- 
liant and convincing. She studied political econ- 
omy at the University of Zurich and has been in 
touch with public life in Europe as well as in the 
United States. Her home is in Philadelphia and 
she is a native of Pittsburg. Mrs. Foster is much 
talked of as the probable successor of the Rev. 
Anna Shaw, president of the association that she 
has served so faithfully. 

9 * * 

Increased Use of Motor Cars 

M. Faroux, a French statistician, estimates that 
about 550,000 motor cars have been manufactured 
in the nine years since the experiments of self-pro- 
pelled road vehicles first succeeded. These ma- 
chines sold for more than a billion dollars. Until 
a year ago France, the pioneer, led the world in the 
production of the motor vehicle. Now the United 
States has taken the lead. According to M. Faroux, 
the United States built 60,000 automobiles in 1906 ; 
France, 55.000 ; England, 28,000 ; Germany, 22,000 ; 
Italy, 19,000 and Belgium, 12,000. In 1901 the 
United States built only 314 cars, and that same 
year France built 23,711. There are 20,212 auto- 



mobiles owned within 50 miles of the New York 
city hall. 

* * * 

The Horse Out of Date 

Slowly but surely the horse is being displaced by 
the motor car for commercial use. The big stores 
of New York and vicinity are adopting automobiles 
for delivery purposes. A New York firm recently 
installed four delivery cars. They state that one 
good motor car does the work of two two-horse 
teams, and at a saving of considerable expense. 
Thus far their experience with gasoline automobiles 
for rural delivery dates back only from last May. 
but it has been entirely successful. 

* * * 
Changes in the Schools 

With the opening of the public schools in Sep- 
tember there will be added to the teaching staff 
several men who have proved their worth as educa- 
tors. Dr. W. A. Edwards, formerly of the faculty 
of the Throop Polytechnic Institute of Pasadena, 
will have charge of the classical studies at the Los 
Angeles High School. Albert E. Wilson, formerly 
principal of the Ogden High School, will be at the 
head of the department of modern languages in the 
high school and James E. McBurney will be in- 
structor in art. 

* * * 

A Cool Reminder 

Now that Vice-President Fairbanks has achieved 
the distinction of having a cocktail named for him 
it may be said that his boom for President has 
reached the limit of its capacity. It is eminently 
fitting- that the cocktail should be one of the frappe 
kind, as the cooler it is the more it will resemble 
the manner of the distinguished man of whom it is 
intended to remind the Army of the Thirsty. 

* * * 
Uncertain 

Parson (on a bicycling trip) — Where is the other 
man who used to be here as keeper? Park Gate- 
keeper — He's dead, sir. Parson (with feeling) — 
Dead ! Poor fellow ! Joined the great majority, 
eh? Park Gatekeeper — Oh, I wouldn't like to say 
that, sir. He was a good enough man, as far as I 
know. — Punch. 



The Reynolds Brothers' 



Thoroughly 
Patented 



Wave Motor 



Indorsed 



Based on Correct Principles and Sound Philosophy 




CALIFORNIA WAVE MOTOR CO. 



A complete unit system of wave 
power production, equalization and 
transmission. Backed by conservative 
business judgment and planned by in- 
telligent mechanics. Utilizes the hori- 
zontal motion of the ocean waves, the 
greater force of the ocean's energy. 
One of the great things that is com- 
ing that can scarcely be spoken of in 
figures. Solves the question of light, 
heat and power without the use of 
fuel of any kind. Use good judgment 
and buy stock in it now, while it is 
young. Grow up with it and become 
a member of the richest corporation 
in the world. 

312 South Broadway 



Pacific C\u t I o o k 



25 




Notes on Amusements 
Charles Frohman has announced for autumn pro- 
duction in New York: "The Dairy Maid." a musical 
play with Huntley Wright in the cast; "When 
Knights Were Bold" with Francis Wilson as star; 
"The Ranger," Augustus Thomas's new play, for 
Dustin Farnum ; "My Wife." a four act comedy for 
John Drew; and "Les Bouft'ons." ("The Jesters") 
for Maude Adams. Outside New York the first 
hearing will be given to George Ade's new drama 
in Chicago. William H. Crane will star in it. Miss 
Barrymore, who is to have her choice of two plays, 
probablv will appear as Rosalind in "As You Like 
It." 

Sparks Berry came back from his vacation this 
week and before his fishing tackle had been brought 
from the station he was engaged in anouncing plans 
for the autumn season at the Auditorium. The 
Italian Opera company will open about November 
i. A complete list of the stars has not yet been 
made, but the leading soprano will be either Tetraz- 
zini or Padovanni, while Pertozzi and Ferabini will 
be the second sopranos. Collamarini, a favorite in 
California, will be the contralto, and a hew tenor, 
Francesco Signorini, will be presented. Much is 
promised for the orchestra. 

Benjamin Chapin's characterization of Abraham 
Lincoln at the Orpheum this week was of more 
than common interest. That it is far above the 
commonplace cannot be denied even by the most 
severe critic. Inasmuch as few, perhaps none, who 
saw his sketch remember the real man, the actor 
had to confront the trying necessity of satisfying 
the public's ideal of the great statesman. The 
similarity between Mr. Chapin's appearance and the 
well known portraits is astonishing. 

Miss Blanche Stoddard, last seen in Los Angeles 
when she appeared with Miss Margaret Anglin in 
"Zira," will succeed Miss Lillian Albertson as lead- 
ing woman at the Belasco. Miss Stoddard will 
make her first appearance in Maxine Elliott's play, 
"Her Own Way." Marion Berg, who goes to New 
York next week, will be much missed from the com- 
pany. She has made many friends in Los Angeles. 
Her successor has not yet been chosen. 

"The Jilt", Dion Boucicault's well known play, 
was revived this week at the Burbank. T. Daniel 
Frawley as My les O'Hara does a good piece of 
work. Blanche Hall as Kittie has a chance to re- 
veal much of the charm of her personality and 
Maude Gilbert in the name part contributes a clever 
bit of acting. 

"The Adventures of Lady Ursula" this week 
served the Belasco company as a vehicle for the 
display of its members' fine talents. Hobart Bos- 
worth, in the role long identified with E. H. Soth- 



ern, again demonstrated how polished an artist he 
has become in his brilliant career. "The Charity 
liali" will be put on the week of August 12. 

.Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Stone returned this week 
from a trip to the mountains. They will pass sev- 
eral days at Catalina. Mr. Stone's vacation will 
end August 17 when he will return to the Belasco 
cast in "The Admirable Crichton." 

* * * 

Since Mr. Frohman started a bus service to con- 
vey playgoers between the suburbs and his theatres, 
people are calling him Mr. To-and-Frohman. — Lon- 
don Opinion. 

* * * 

Tommy — Does it make any difference if baby 
takes all his medicine at once? Baby's Mother (in 
horror) — Good heavens ! Of course it does ! Tommy 
— But it hasn't made any difference. — Punch. 

* * * 

Mr. Jawback — The biggest idiots always seem to 
marry the prettiest women. Mrs. Jawback — Now, 
you're trying to flatter me. — Cleveland Leader. 




A PROPOSITION 

**« ?li/ilniniii v 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St,. 




Office Phone: Ji tost 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

555 South Hill Street 

Residence Phone: E 2727 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



Fifteen E.arthqvaaKes a Day- 
There are two principal classes of earthquakes ; 
those which are of volcanic origin and those which 
arise from tectonic, or mountain building, move- 
ments of the earth's crust. 

The volcanic quakes, as the name implies, occur 
in districts of active volcanism and originate not 
far below the surface, probably at depths of less 
than two miles. 

The characteristics of a volcanic quake, says»Dis- 
covery, are a rather definite point of origin, or "cen- 
trum," a comparatively restricted area of disturb- 
ance and .the usual absence of secondary after 
shocks. » 

Tectonic or dislocation earthquakes are practical- 
ly confined to those portions of the earth's crust 
which are still undergoing changes of elevation due 
to the action of mountain building forces. Such 
quakes are usually to be assigned to a deep seated 
origin, as compared with the volcanic quakes. 

They are characterized by an indefinite or lin- 
ear centrum, a great radius of influence and by suc- 
ceeding subordinate shocks, which sometimes recur 
for months or even years. The great destructive 
earthquakes which have occurred within the his- 
toric period have been assigned for the most part to 
this class of quakes. 

Earthquakes are progapated by waves, which are 
of four kinds: (i) Normal, in which the vibrations, 
are forward and back along radii emanating from 
the centrum of the quake ; (2) transverse, in which 
the vibrations are perpendicular to the radii; (3) 
surface, in which the movement is very slow, com- 
paratively speaking and is horizontal in character; 
(4) epifocal. Waves of the first three classes de- 
pend for their amplitude on the elasticity of the 
rocks through which they pass. They are seldom 
visible, though they are felt to a greater or less de- 
gree, and although they are propagated with dif- 
ferent velocities, they are not always distinguish- 
able, even by aid of seismographs. 

The waves of the fourth class, the epifocal, are 
those which are conspicuous, terrifying and de- 
structive. They are caused when strong waves of 
the first two classes pass from highly elastic rocks 
into adjacent almost inelastic soil and unconsoli- 
dated sediments. These are the waves which eye 
witnesses of great earthquakes have described as 
causing the surface of the ground to rise and fall 
like the billows of the ocean, opening cracks in the 
crests and closing them again in the troughs as the 
motion passes along. 

The present period has been supposed by many 
especially those not versed in geology, to be a sea- 
son of rest in the action of earth building forces, 
this, however, is not the case. We know of a 
gentle upward movement of the earth's crust in 
the Hudson Bay region, in New York and the east- 
ern Great Lakes, and of the subsidence of parts of 
the Atlantic coast and the elevation of other parts 
but these are slow and their connection with earth- 
quakes has not been established. Certain areas 
however, present definite breaks in the rocks with 
surfaces polished or striated by friction, indicating 
ancient movements which must have been accom- 
panied by great earthquakes. 

The frequency of earthquake shocks, considering 
those of all amplitudes, is not generally realized 
The globe, indeed, may be said 'hardly ever to be 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at, Reduced 
Rates 

140 S. BROADWAY 

Main 19 Get, a City Map Free Home Ex. 19 



GERMAN AMERKAN 
SOWINGS/- BANK 




The building of a 
Bank Account is 
not difficult if the 
"builder" is persist- 
ent. 



This Bank is the medium through which over 20,000 
people are saving money. •]] Bear in mind that the German- 
American Savings Bank has the largest Capital and Surplus 
of any Savings Bank in Los Angeles. <1 Resources over 
$10,000,000. Four percent on deposits. 

(Scrmatt-Ammratt #amnga IBank 

223 South Spring St.. Branch: Main and First. Sts. 



You Have a Mind 
of Your Own . . . 



When you once make up your mind that 
you want a certain article advertised in the 
PACIFIC OUTLOOK and you decide to 
buy it, do not be sidetracked by any "Just 
as Good" talk that may be given you. First 
class dealers give you what you ask for. 

The PACIFIC OUTLOOK accepts only 
the advertisements of reliable firms — buy of 
them and prove by your own experience 
that the article advertised is what the re- 
putable merchant claims. BUY ADVER- 
TISED GOODS— BUY OF THE ADVER- 
TISER. 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



free from seismic disturbances of some kin.l some- 
where, for the average of all recorded shocks is 
more than 15 a day, anl the bare enumeration 

lining in 1903 fill- a hook of 600 tabulated 
Mi. nit 60 ln.i\ .our every year on 

m average. The Count de Montessus de Ballbre 

has plotted upon maps of the hemispheres the | 

- of the [59,784 independent quakes which had 
been recorded up to 1903. It was found by de Bal- 
lore that 96 i'if cent "t" all the recorded quakes had 
Occurred within the limits of certain well defined 
zones, which are along lines where the crust is benl 
downward forming great troughs, though the 
troughs are only to I" recogni; ed geologically; that 
]-. by the relation of one rock strata to another. 
without reference t<> the surface configuration of 
the earth. 

9 » • 

Multiplication Mystery 

A government mathematician has made the dis- 
covery that the number 142,857 possesses peculiar 
properties. If we multiply it by any number up to 
six we arrive at products expressed by exactly the 
same figures as those in the original, and in the 
same order, except that a different figure leads each 
of the numbers resulting from the multiplication. 
With the multiplication by six the oddness stops, 
though the result of multiplying by seven gives the 
number 999,999. Here are the results mentioned : 

142,857 multiplied by 1 is the same. 

142,857 multiplied by 2 is 285,714. 

142,857 multiplied by 3 is 428,571. 

142,857 multiplied by 4 is 571,428. 

142,857 multiplied by 5 is 714,285. 

142,857 multiplied by 6 is 857,142. 
* * * 

Almost Brings Dead to Life 

An apparatus for producing artificial- respiration 
has recently been advertised whereby in cases of sus- 
pended animation the action of the heart and lungs 
cftn be renewed. 

Prof. George Poe, the inventor of the apparatus, 
does not insist that with its use life can be brought 
back, but claims, according to the Scientific Ameri- 
can, that by artificial means appiied through the 
instrumentality of the respirator persons killed by 
asphyxiation, poison or drowning can be resuscit- 
ated; that the death of persons under the influence 
'of anaesthetics while being operated upon can be 
prevented ; that its use will prevent infant asphyxia 
at birth ; that a drunken person can be sobered in i 
few minutes ; that persons electrocuted or hanged — 
in the latter case where the neck has not been 
broken — can be revived, and that the freezing to 
death of Arctic explorers can be obviated. These 
results are accomplished by stimulating normal res- 
piration through artificial means. 

A demonstration was made on a rabbit. Two 
grains of morphine were injected into the leg, after 
which four ounces of ether were administered. It 
was believed by the experimenters that life was posi- 
tively extinct, as the application of every known 
test failed to reveal any sign of life. In this condi- 
tion the tubes of the apparatus were applied to the 
rabbit's nostrils, and on pumping out the poison 
with one cylinder pumping oxygen into the lungs 
with a simultaneous movement of the valves, with- 
in three minutes the rabbit, but lately pronounced 



dead, was breathing naturally, and within six min- 
utes it was running around the room. The ether 
was entirely out of the system, as there was no in- 
dication of nan 

* * * 
New Motor "Wheel 

Consul Thomas II. Norton, of Chemnitz, reports 
that a Saxon engineer has perfected a new wdicel 
intended to replace the use of pneumatic tires for 
automobiles and bicycles, of which the consul gives 
the following account: 

A manufacturer in Chemnitz has undertaken the 
construction of this novelty, and it may mark an 
important step in the evolution of motor vehicles. 
The fundamental principle is the construction of a 
wheel which is not rigid, but possesses in itself a 
sufficient degree of elasticity effectively to replace 
the resilience of the customary pneumatic tire. The 
wheel is made entirely of the finest quality of steel 
— fellies, spokes, and hub. The spokes are not siin- 
'ply radii of a circle, as in the ordinary wheel con- 
struction. They are essentially diameters of the 
wheel. Each diameter, or double spoke, is a round 
wire or rod, flattened, however, in the middle, where 
it is firmly attached to the hub, about which it is 
bent so as to form an angle of about 90 degrees. 
The entire system of spokes consists, therefore,, of 
a series of Ls arranged about the hub. The latter 
is formed of two close-fitting parts moving slightly 
one against the other. 

The practical result of this arrangement is that 
when carrying a load the spoke, for the moment ex- 
tending to the point of contact between the wheel 
and the roadbed, is slightly shortened, and its right- 
angled complement is lengthened to the same ex- 
tent. The form of the wheel becomes faintly ellip- 
tical (all of the spokes and fellies sharing, to a 
more or less limited degree, in the deflection from 
the normal position). The compound spoke assumes 
its original position as the load bears upon its neigh- 
bor, and, as the wheel moves forward, there is a 
constant change in the location of the ellipse. The 
result of this continual spring-like alteration in the 
form of the wheel is an avoidance of jar and vibra- 
tion to the load, i. e., the rider of a bicycle or the 
passengers of a vehicle, equivalent to that produced 
by the use of pneumatic tires. This effect is height- 
ened by the addition of solid rubber tires, covering 



Summer Prices 

IN 

Table 
Silverware 



We need the room for our fall stock and offer both 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 




~N!V"e are Practico 


Watchraahers - 




You See Us 







BRIGDEN m PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



an air cushion in the channeled concave of the 
wheel's rim. 

The whole construction is exceedingly simple. 
The surface exposed to friction in the slight internal 
movements of the composite hub is easily lubricated 
and well protected from dust, while the actual fric- 
tion is so small as to scarcely enter intoconsideration. 
It is this simplicity and this freedom from the neces- 
sity of frequent attention and the ever-present dan- 
ger of interruption and delay which will probably 
appeal powerfully to the users of bicycles-and auto- 
mobiles. The annoyance of punctured tires and the 
enforced necessity of providing for such emer- 
gencies has always been 1 a serious drawback to the 
otherwise great convenience of pneumatic tires, not 
to mention their exceedingly short term of life. 
» » » 

The Baleful Strawberry 

Hygienists who delight is raising alarms against 
popular foods, are now tilting against strawberries. 
These are accused of having bad effect upon the 
tempers of their eaters, who, it is alleged, become 
sulky and irritable after eating them. A hygienist 
is quoted as saying that ladies are particularly sus- 
ceptible in this respect. Some of them will eat a 
pound or more of strawberries at a time and then 
become so morose that people are glad to avoid 
them. The fact is they are physically ill without 
knowing it. They are suffering from the straw- 
berry disease, the symptoms of which are slight 
dizziness, a desire to be alone and intolerance of be- 
ing questioned. 

The strawberries which have the worst effect are 
the large, mashy ones. The small kinds, with seeds 
on the surface, are usually harmless. The trouble 
is ascribed to the strawberry acids, which cream 
does not mollify. Indeed, the fruit is more whole-' 
some without cream or sugar, and nobody should 
eat more than a dozen at a time. 

Eustace Miles, the English tennis player, as a 
vegetarian dietist confirms the danger to some per- 
sons from strawberries. He says they contain three 
acids, phosphoric, sulphuric a'nd silicic. He believes 
that the last named causes the trouble. In addition 
to irritability sufferers have strawberry rash and 
strawberry headache. 

» » » 
The Diet of Consumptives 

Herbert C. Clapp of Boston says in the Medical 
Record that diet is a most important factor in the 
treatment of tuberculosis. A consumptive is much 
more likely to eat too little than too much. System- 
atic overfeeding with proper digestion of the food 
are the accepted remedies. The food must be palat- 
able and well served and the amount must vary 
with the patient and his circumstances. The out- 
door air will enable him to assimilate large amounts. 

Milk and eggs are the best foods to produce fats, 
which are most necessary to the patient. The au- 
thor advocates three solid meals a day, with 
lunches between of milk and eggs, about three 
quarts of milk and six eggs a day being taken. ■ 
Fresh meats are especially necessary for these pa- 
tients, but a mixed diet is undoubtedly the best 
borne. Meat juice is valuable. 

Pastry, candy, fried foods and cabbage should be 
let alone. Alcohol is not advisable, but coffee, tea 
and chocolate may be taken moderately. 



PicK Pochets With Their Feet 

"The best pickpockets, " said Lecoq, the detec- 
tive, "are the Hindus. You have to call them light 
toed as well as light fingered, for they can lift a 
watch or purse as easily with their feet as with 
their hands. 

"Trained from childhood, these barefooted ras- 
cals are wonderfully skilful with their toes. This 
gives them a great advantage. A Hindu in a crowd 
will stand with his arms ostentatiously folded and 
sneak with his foot the wallet from your trousers 
pocket." — Philadelphia Bulletin. 



Facing 

the 

Park 

and 
Close 

to 
Ocean 



Hotel Savoy 

EUROPEAN PUAN 

Everything New 

No. 142-144 Pacific Avenue 
Long Beach, Cal. 



Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 

Home 
Phone 
1743 



♦♦Shoups Place.. 

FOR REGULAR MEALS 

J 44 Pacific Avenue 

Opposite Park Long Beach, Cal. 



Home Phone 1183 



Sunset 3443 



S3 



Hotel Yale (European) 

Comer First and Pacific Ave. 

and "SURF VIEW" on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M. WORMLEY, Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies, Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread, "Like mother used to make" 
Home Ph one J073 

114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



(£ty %niljta att& Kntwx 



Leading Apartment House in Long Beach 

Opposite Auditorium — Pleasure Pier— P. E. 
Depot and Fronting the Ocean 

Single rooms and 2, 3 and 4 room suites. Every suite has 
private bath. Home 24. P. O. Box 214. 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



Some FreaK Eg'g's 

The stories told bj poultry keepers in regard to 
the laying of eggs arc in danger of becoming viewed 

by the public in the same suspicious lights as the 
tall yarns of fishermen. 

It is announced that an egg laid by a hen be- 
longing to a coastguards officer at Bridgeport 
measured 7?s inches by '>.* , inches, while another 
of similar size picked up in a farmyard at Fenny 
Stratford was. on being opened, found to contain a 
perfectly formed second egg. The record monster 
chicken's c^g is believed to be one of 8^4 inches by 
~ inches and weighing 5 ounces. 

The most freakish eggs are attributed to ducks. 
The Western Park Museum, Sheffield, has a duck's 
egg which contains another smaller one inside, and 
a still greater curiosity is a twin egg, the two being 
joined together end to end. 

In a museum at Paris a curious four-footed goose 
lays an egg which is invariably mishaped and the 
shell of which is so brittle that it breaks if touched. 
All efforts to preserve these eggs have been futile. 

An egg apparently in a state of perfect preserva- 
tion is reported to have been discovered embedded 
in the mortar of an ancient church near Paris. As 
the wall had been standing for fully 800 years the 
eggs must have been undisturbed for all that long 
period. 

* * * 

Met His Match 

Once while Bishop Talbot, long known as "the 
cowboy Bishop," was attending a meeting of dig- 
nitaries of the church at St. Paul, a tramp ap- 
proached a group of Bishops gathered on the hotel 
porch at noon and asked for aid. "No," one of the 
churchmen replied "I don't think we can do any- 
thing. But down there is the youngest Bishop of 
us all (pointing to Bishop Talbot) and he's a very 
generous man." 

The tramp went to Bishop Talbot and the others 
watched with interest. They saw a look of sur- 
prise come over the tramp's fae. They saw that the 
Bishop was talking eagerly, earnestly. They saw 
the tramp look perturbed; but they finally saw 
something passed from hand to hand. The tramp 
tried to get away without speaking to those of the 
group, but he former spokesman called to him : 
"Well, did you get something from our young 
brother?" 

The tramp grinned sheepishly. "No; I gave him 
a dollar for his blamed new cathedral at Laramie !" 

* * * 

But Not "Ladylike" 
"The Yellow Ribbon," a weekly publication es- 
tablished in San Francisco a few months ago by- 
Mrs. Katherine Reed Ballentine, daughter of the 
late Thomas B. Reed, has been merged in the 
"Western Woman," which will succeed "The "V el- 
low Ribbon" as the organ of the equal suffragists. 
Laura Bride Powers, formerly associated with the 
San Francisco Call, is editor of the "Western 
Woman." Mrs. Powers is a weil-trained news- 
paper woman, whose pen has a sharp point when it 
traces words for public print. In outlining the style 
of her paper the editor says: 

"Western Woman." let it be understood at the 
outset, aims to be 110 Ladylike magazine — no La- 
dies' Home Journal (with all due courtesv to 



sweet, cunnin' little Mr. Bok — he's such a dear!) 
but a Womanly paper, standing for the big. worth- 
while, real issues of Life that as human beings and 
mothers of the race we are forced to meet." 

* * * 

OstricK Sale Days 

"Sale days for ostriches arc held in Cape Colony, 
South Africa, the same as public sales for horsrs 
and fine cattle in this country," Edward C. Baum, 
who recently returned from South Africa, said re- 
cently. "Some specimens of the males sell for 
$2,500, and from $500 to $1,000 each is the ordinary 
price. The wild ones are not so valuable as the 
tame ones. 

"The ostrich likes human company and either the 
owner of the flock or some member of his family 
is with them all the time. The owners of the big 
flocks have recently discovered that alfalfa is the 
best kind of feed for them, and the alfalfa craze is 
on in the Cape. Prickly pears have been the ostrich 
feed in the past." — Kansas City Star. 

* * * 

Owner of Motor Car (to chauffeur) — Have you a 
recommendation from your last employer? Chauf- 
feur — No, sir ; but I can get one in the course of a 
month or so. Owner of Motor Car — Why the de- 
lay? Chauffeur — He's in. the hospital. — Tit-Bits. 



if to 



and listen for the approach of the unseen forces 
at work in a campaign for clean politics and 
better government. This movement is now 
taking root in every part of California and will 
eventually break forth into a great concerted 
action to wrest the control of our state and 
municipalities from corporation influence. If 
you want to know the "Signs of the Times" 
and to read the truth presented in clear, force- 
ful manner, start right by becoming a regular 
reader of the Pacific Outlook. 

We began on May 18 the first instalment 
of a series of articles showing the growth and 
progress of this great movement in Los An- 
geles, and this will be followed by a greater 
and more sensational series that will cause 
you to sit up and take notice. 

You wouldn't miss these serials for the price 
of ten subscriptions, so order today by phone 
or letter and have the story complete — its only 
$2.00 a year. 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Dividing the Responsibility- 
Early in Baron Hnddleston's career at the bar he 
shared rooms with another barrister. Bodkin went 
one evening to take tea and wine with the future 
Baion, and he particularly noticed the dirty, sloven- 
ly appearance of the clerk who waited upon them, 
and of whom the host had for the nonce assumed 
exclusive possession. 

Bodkin strongly advised Huddleston to insist on 
a change in the treatment of the youngster's per- 
son and appearance, and said it was scarcely decent 
to have a person in that dingy condition about him. 
"I do not much like to interfere," was the reply, "he 
looks upon Mr. T. as his master, and at the utmost 
I cannot claim more than half of him." 

"Then," said Bodkin, "I would, at all events, 
make him wash my half of his face." 

* * * 

A Case of Professional Pride 

Winthrop E. Stone, president of Purdue Univer- 
sity, in an address in Lafayette said of ignorance : 

"Ignorance makes all it touches ridiculous. Noth- 
ing, not even culture, is immune to its attacks. Did 
you ever hear of the ignorant millionaire's library? 

"Well, there was a millionaire, a cattleman, who 
led a visitor into a great room lined with thousands 
of volumes. 

"'See them books?' he said. 

" 'Yes,' said the visitor. 

' 'They're all bound in calf, ain't they?' 

" 'Yes,' the visitor agreed ; 'they seem to have a 
uniform calf binding.' 

"The millionaire chuckled proudly. 

" 'Well, sir,' he said, 'I killed all them calves my- 
self.' " 

* * * 

Had Enoug'h TootHpicKs 
A well known sculptor tells the following story : 
"Whenever I see a toothpick I think of a dinner 
that was given iti Rome in honor of two Turkish 
noblemen: 

"I sat beside the younger of the noblemen. He 
glittered with gold embroidery and great diamonds, 
but nevertheless I pitied him sincerely, for he was 
strange to our table manners, and some of his errors 
were both ludicrous and painful. 

"Toward the dinner's end a servant extended to 
the young man a plate of toothpicks. He waved 
the plate away, saying in a low and bitter voice : 

" 'No, thank you; I have already eaten two of the 
accursed things, and I want no more." 

* * * 
Chose the Lesser Evil 

The burglar's wife was in the witness box and 
the prosecuting attorney was conducting a vigorous 
cross-examination. 

"Madam, you are the wife of this man?" 

"Yes." 

"You knew he was a burglar when you married 
him?" 

"Yes." 

"How did you come to contract a matrimonial 
alliance with such a man?" 

"Well," the witness said sarcastically, "I was get- 
ting old and had to choose between a lawyer and a 
burglar." 

The cross-examination ended there. 



Hymn of the Averag'e 

It wearies to aim for distinction 

Or wage an unusual strife; 
I'd just be an average mortal 
'And live just an average life. 

I'd fail with the average losses, 

Succeed with the average gain, 
Rejoice in the average sunshine, 

And rail at the average rain. 

I'd love with the average fervor, 
And hate with the average strength, 

Complain with the average grumbling, 
And live to the average length. 

Theologies' mix and confuse us; 

When done with this world of the proud 
I'd just be an average angel 
And float on an average cloud. 

— New York Sun. 
* * * 
"Wanted— A Pass 
Although I know 'tis Roosevelt's way, 

And therefore in the pale, 
I do not ask a battleship 
For my vacation sail. 

Although the eighty millionth part 

I know is rightly mine, 
I do not for a cruiser ask 

When I would cross the brine. 

Although I know that Uncle Sam 

Delights to give free rides, 
I do not even want a yacht 

To breast the swelling tides. 

Man wants but little here below; 

I hate the grafting school, 
And therefore I would be content 

With just an army mule. 

— Nev 



York Sun. 



* * * 
A Suspect 



So many writers disagree 

O'er what wild creatures do, 
It's mighty hard, 'twixt you and me, 

To say just who is who. 
You cannot credit what is said, 

Nor your own observations, 
Till with attention you have read 

The latest publications. 

When I behold the busy bee 

Which once I so admired, 
A grim suspicion puzzles me 

Until my brain grows tired. 
Sir Bee, do you work hard all day. 

No moment's pleasure taking? 
Are you as busy as they say? 

Or are you nature faking? 

— Washington Star. 

* * * 

The Silly Season 

I wonder if each pair of pears 

That any pear tree bears 
Are man and wife, or if they are 

Just simply friendly pears? 

The' prune tree too its puzzles me, 

And has for many moons; 
If I should prune the prune tree, would 

It still be good for prunes? 

And though I'm not a plumber, I 

Have cogitated some: 
Would any plum tree bear as well 

If it were out of plumb? 

* * * 
Better Day Coming' 

Oh, what is the use of repining? 

Drive doubt and sorrow away, 
Tomorrow the sun may be shining. 

Although graft is reigning today. 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



Stray Notes of Interest 

Although the Sultan has been long opposed to the 
introduction of a telephone system into any part of 
Turkey, it is announced that the Sublime Porti 
decided t" let the Ministry of Communications 
work out a method of supplying Constantinople 
with g hated invention. 

The cornerstone of tin- new home of the Califor- 
nia C'lnii. the women's organization of largest mem- 
bership in San Francisco, last Saturday. 
The building, a picturesque structure, will occupj 
a desirable site on Clay street, between Polk street 
and Van Ness avenue. 

New York police judges have put on the black 
robes similar to those worn by justices of the 
Supreme Court, and it is said" that there is a 
marked improvement in the behavior of the prison- 
ers and loungers, who appear to feel an added re- 
spect for the magistrates. 

According to recent statistics, the number of di- 
vorces is increasing rapidly in all countries on the 
Continent. Switzerland leads with forty to' 1,000 
marriages. France is next with twenty-one out of 
a thousand, and Germany follows with seventeen. 

"Lucky" Baldwin, now 81 years old, has an- 
nounced that he will build a $500,000 hotel at Tal- 
:ac. the famous resort at the southern end of Lake 
Tahoe. 

A skeleton supposed to be all that remains of 
Pocahontas has been dug up in an ancient parish 
burying ground at Gravesend, England. 

The foreign trade of the Philippines underwent 
a considerable shrinkage last year. The decline in 
imports from the United States, amounting to more 



than a million dollars as compared with those of 
oportion to the reduction in 
the general import trade of the fslands, and indi- 
- thai the United States has home something 
more than the whole brunt of the import decline 
for the whole year, exclusive of the items of rice 
and opium. 

Recent estimates place the annual tribute paid 
by American tourists to the various countries of 
Europe at Sj28.00o.00o. Paris modistes receive $8,- 
000.000 and Paris milliners $1,500,000. More than 
300,000 residents of the United States make the 
tour each year. 

The Las Vegas and Tonopah railway line be- 
tween (ioldfield and Rhyolite will be finished Sep- 
tember 1. 

* 9 * 

M^asn't in His Line 

A washerwoman applied to a gentleman for work, 
and he gave her a note to the manager of a certain 
club. It read as follows: 

"Dear Mr. X. — This woman wants washing." 
Very shortly afterwards the answer came back : 
"Dear Sir, — I dare say she does; but I don't fancy 
the job." — Human Life. 

* * * 

Marryat — So that great inventor is dead, and his 
wonderful secret is lost. Newitt — Not at all. He 
told his wife just before he died. Nimrod — Yes, 
that's what I mean. — Philadelphia Press. 

* * * 

If you have anything to say to a mule, say it to 
his face. — Chicago Daily News. 













THE WAYSIDE PRESS 




214 FRANKLIN STREET 
Printers, Designers, Binders 

The Character of the Work. Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 

QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 

Home A 1853 —Phones— Main 1566 


di 


Jrei 


PRINTING THAT TALKS 









..A»i.i...c.i,ror«i. THE CITY'S BIG WASTE PIPE 



August lO. 1907 




(« 




SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR$2°£ 



i. 




A great opportunity now to take advantage cf rare bargains in women's 
suits. All kinds and styles that are in demand; Fancy Etons, hobby 
Prince Chap and handsome Cutaways; all the desirable shades of the 
saason in high grade woolens, comprehensive assortments of first grade 
suits incomparably priced. Also popular styles, in cool summer suits, 
made of linen, lawn and other wash materials. Unparalleled value- 
giving now in this department. Visit if you have a suit need. 



"50A\ETMI 



O I /N G - 




BROADWAY 



cor Firm st. 




Ufye True Osteopath 

is the true 

PHYSICIAN 

He must be fitted to do the best thing possible under 
every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

Will teach you the science of the true Osteopath. 
Fall term begins September 3. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
Pres.; Stanley M. Hunter, Vice-Pres.; W. J. Cook, 
Sec. and C. A. Whiting, Chairman of the Faculty. 
Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 






Teachers for California 

IjtjJE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, fl If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-operative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



George Batter Anderson 
EDITOR 



Jr Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland ICtnkald 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gatloupe 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Published every Saturday at 423*423 Chamber of Com* 
merce Build. ng, Lot Jin S eles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription price? $2.00 a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on all news stands. 

Entered as second-class mailer April ;, 1907, at the postoffice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March J, 1879. 



Vol. S. Los Jtngeles. CaL, .August lO, 1907 Mo. 6 

The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 

"We need clean, healthy newspapers, with clean, 
healthy criticism which shall be FEARLESS AND 
TRUTHFUL."— Theodore Roosevelt. 

COMMENT 

As indicated in these columns last week, the first 
thoroughly organized anti-Southern Pacific machine 
movement in California, so far as state politics is 
concerned, has been inaugurated. At a meeting at 
Oakland last Thursday the Lincoln-Roosevelt Re- 
publican League was formed. Its members are 
Republicans, and the organization is intended to 
clean out the Republican party in California. Stand- 
ing on a platform containing two great fundamental 
principles — opposition to the Southern Pacific rail- 
road as a factor in state and county politics and 

advocacy of the principles which 

Now for a have made Theodore Roosevelt 

House-cleaning the most popular man the United 

States has evef produced — the 
new organization will act as a sort of central com- 
mittee and sponsor for a chain of Lincoln-Roose- 
velt Republican clubs to be organized throughout 
California. The movement cannot fail to be a 
popular "lie once the principles back of. the project 
arc thoroughly understood. In directing its energies 
against tie Southern Pacific as the dominating 
power in local politics it is but natural that it should 
support Roosevelt doctrines and either Roosevelt 
or an acknowledged advocate of the Roosevelt doc- 
trine for the Presidency in iyo8. 



Every well-informed man in California knows 
that the Southern Pacific will direct its energies to- 
ward the selection of a strong anti-Roosevelt dele- 
gation to the National Republican convention next 
year. As a matter of fact its work has alreadv been 
begun, with carefully laid plans. Not long since a 
meeting, supposed to have been secret, was held in 
the office of United States Senator Flint in this city 
at which, it is said, steps were taken to strengthen 
the railroad machine, in which Senator Flint is a 
secondary cog. In San Francisco Herrin has been 
at work more actively than ever before to break the 
combination against him. Throughout the state 
desperate efforts are being made by the corpora- 
tion's managers to defeat the ends of 
Cannot Serve the great Roosevelt majority in Cali- 
Two Masters fornia. Therefore never before has 
the need of strong and harmonious 
Republican organization in this state been felt. 
From this time forth the most determined and la- 
borious efforts will be required to save the Republi- 
can party to the Republicans. Those Republicans 
who desire to see Southern Pacific control per- 
petuated, with a Democrat at the head of the or- 
ganization, will support the men put forward by 
the foul machine which has ground California to a 
pulp. Those who believe in popular government — 
government of the people, by the people and for 
the people — will rally at once to the support of the 
new housecleaning force organized at Oakland last 
Thursday. There is to be no middle ground in 
igo8. Republican voters must align themselves 
either for or against control of their party by them- 
selves. 

* * * 
It is well to have it understood, at the start, that 
the movement bearing the name of Lincoln and 
Roosevelt is not non-partisan. It is strictly a parti- 
san movement. Its promoters, all Republicans, are 
making a direct appeal to honest and courageous 
Republicans throughout the state to organize them- 
selves for the purpose of once more taking control 
of the party which for so long has been controlled 
absolutely by as wicked a combination of political 
shysters as ever infested any political organization. 
They realize that it is through its own efforts thai 
the Republican party must be 
Movement Not purged. While there is no doubt 
Non-partisan that there are in the state many 
1 lemocrats who will vote for clean, 
honest, fearless men. many who may be depended 



Pacific Outlook 



upon to act for the benefit of the people, rather than 
at the dictates of a rapacious and utterly corrupt 
railroad machine, feeling that by so doing they will, 
be helping to rid the state of the horrible incubus of 
So ithern Pacific domination, the number of this 
class will be relatively small. The project depends 
for success upon the Republicans of California. It 
will remain with them to say whether the Republi- 
can party in the state shall continue to be the in- 
dividual property of the Democratic hired man of 
the Southern Pacific railroad or become a Republi- 
can party in fact as well as in name. Its birthright 
now is a hollow mockery. 

* * * 

Lee C. Gates has reiterated his assertion that he 
is not and will not be a candidate for congressional 
honors, and his recently published statement in' the 
Express has clarified the atmosphere and made it 
plain to everybody that in voluntarily participating 
in the movement for the reorganization of the Re- 
publican party in California he is actuated solely by 
a desire to see the party placed in control of itself. 
It has been hinted, and even openly asserted, that 
Lee Gates has political ambitions 
Good For which disqualify him for disinterested 
the Eyes and sincere work in any movement 
like that which came to a head in Oak- 
land. His enemies doubtless will continue to repeat 
such charges, when they believe it will be profitable 
to do so. Those who may be siightly influenced 
by the utterances of cynical machine newspapers 
or Southern Pacific bosses would do well to hang 
in a conspicuous place all authoritative statements, 
like that recently made by Mr. Gates, bearing upon 
the movement for a return to government of, by 
and for the people. They are good for the eyes in 
moments of doubt. 

* * * 

Municipal Affairs appears to be the only publica- 
tion in Los Angeles, excepting the Pacific Outlook, 
which believes that the highway bonds are heavily 
handicapped by the presence on the highway com- 
mission of Martin C. Marsh. "The mere fact that 
he has been active in partisan politics is not of itself 
necessarily against him,'.' says this publication, "the 
only question on that point being whether he has 
done politics with a view to making things better 
in city an county, or for the purpose of helping to 
build up the political machine that is fundamentally 
responsible for all that is worst in 

Heavily city and county government." Muni- 

Handicapped cipal Affairs suggests that the man- 
ner in which Mr. Eldridge, through 
the co-operation of Mr. Marsh, secured his nomina- 
tion for supervisor "has a very ugly look." True, 
it has ; and the simple fact that the latter has de- 



voted years of his life to the great game of partisan 
politics is sufficient reason for regarding him as dis- 
qualified to pass upon questions pertaining to the 
construction of good roads, even were he one of the 
most expert road-makers in Los Angeles, particu- 
larly when his political associations with influential 
members of the "solid three' contingent of the 
Board of Supervisors is taken into consideration. 

* * * 

The Pacific Outlook is now, as two months ago, 
of the opinion that the road bonds will not carry 
if Mr. Marsh remain a member of the highway com- 
mission. The supervisors lack much in public con- 
fidence, and the fact that Mr. Marsh is a minority in 
the commission is easily counterbalanced by the 
fact that the machine politicians on the Board of 
Supervisors are safely in the majority. The argu- 
ment that "moral suasion" will' hold the majority 
on the board in check will not hold water. As we 
have pointed out before, moral suasion has been 
tried on the board, and it has been found unavailing 
to budge the three machine men from the position 
they took at the beginning. So long as they please 
the machine element in the party which elected 
them to office, these three men may be depended 
upon to return to their old trick of playing politics 
just as soon as the bonds have 
Moral Suasion been voted. The people of Los 
Won't Work Angeles county will be taking 
great chances if they vote favor- 
ably on the bond question while Martin C. Marsh is 
a member of the highway commission. If they 
want to permit the machine to score in the game, 
they will yote the bonds, willy nilly. But we don't 
believe the voters are in a frame of mind that will 
induce them to take the chance of placing those 
three millions of dollars in a position where any 
considerable proportion thereof may be used to the 
political avantage of the Republican machine of Los 
Angeles county, regardless of how honestly the 
fund may be administered in other ways. Nobody 
fears that Mr. Marsh is intending to appropriate 
any of this fund to his own use, but there is a wide- 
spread fear that he is willing to stand "in cahoots" 
with the dominant faction in the Board of Super- 
visors to the end that political favorites will be giv- 
en preference in the work in hand. 

* * * 

It looks as if the Pacific Outlook were to be the 
only paper and the Voters' League the only civic 
organization which will consistently maintain the 
attitude assumed by the leading - organizations and 
most of the press of Los Angeles during the early 
days of the agitation for the appointment of a good 
highway commission. Up to the time of the grace- 
ful resignation of Captain Banning and the appoint- 



Pacific Outlook 



tnont hi" his successor, the Good Roa iation 

and other organizations which, it is 
Smudge on to be assumed, are sincere in their <lc- 
the Jewel »irv to advance the interests of the 
people who foot the bills, proclaimed 
that they would not be content with a commi 
one of the members of which iliil not enjoy the full 
and unlimited confidence of the people of all parties 
and classes. There appears to have been some sort 
of a compromise, for the commission is not con- 
stituted entirely of nun of the class originally in- 
sisted upon, and the Good Roads Association and 
the daily papers are mum as oysters. The jewel 
known as consistency has been besmudged. 

* * * 

It is .said that the local Democratic organization 
has picked a man tq succeed Nathan Cole as a mem- 
ber of the police commission. Of course he will be 
a good Democrat, with a strong following, especial- 
ly in the ward in which he lives. But what right 
has the Democratic organization to pick Mr. Cole's 
successor? It has a right to suggest to Mayor Har- 
per any candidate it chooses, but the mayor has an 
equal right to forget that there is a Democratic or- 
ganization to be placated and strengthened in any 
such manner. There are three municipal bodies in 
which politics should play no part whatever. These 

are the Board of Education, the 

Politics Board of Health and the Police Com- 

"the Game" mission. The whole trouble with our 

wretched police force may be at- 
tributed to the fact that, from the commission down 
to the lowliest patrolman, politics is the chief con- 
sideration when changes in the department are 
made. Politics resulted in the appointment of Sam- 
uel Schenck. Politics resulted in the appointment 
of Edward Kern. Politics has resulted in the 
notorious conditions in the "tenderloin". Politics — 
politics — politics — first, last and all the time! Get 
a good following of the "faithful" in your ward, 
walk up to the city hall with a handful of "indorse- 
ments" from the "leaders", and the fight is ninety 
per cent won. It is the same old story, with slight 
variations. Politics is still "the game". 

* » * 

The impending change in the personnel of the po- 
lice commission furnishes the opportunity again to 
emphasize the desirability of a single-headed police 
commission. That the responsibility for the con- 
duct of this semi-military department of municipal 
affairs should be vested in more than one man, 
dividing the responsibility and making it wellnigh 
impossible to place it where it belongs much of 
the time, is not in accord with the spirit of the age. 
Wherever the one-man commission idea is in vogue 
it has been found to work admirablv — much better 



than a COmmi nposed of three or live men. 

While framing a new ('in Charter 

One-man it will be well to bear this fact in 

Commission mind. If the men who draft the 

document have any doubts in the 

mailer, let them get in touch with some man like 

Mayor ■ McClellan or Commissioner Bingham of 

Xew York and satisfy themselves as to the work- 
ings of a one-man commission, especially in the de- 
partment of the police. In the meantime let the 
local politicians get all the comfort and satisfaction 
they can out of their bandying to and fro, like the 
winged ball used in the old-fashioned game of 
shuttlecock, the personnel of the police commission, 
using the office as a reward for political services 
rendered. That is what has been done for years 
past, and there is little evidence that the rules of the 
game are to be changed at present. 
* * * 
A fair illustration of the manner in which politi- 
cal favorites are sometimes the subject of unneces- 
sary courtesies is found in the case of B. F. Healy, 
hoseman in the fire department, who, once having 
lost his place, was reinstaated by the fire commis- 
sion in defiance of civil service regulations. In 
spite of the law, which was practically placed at 
naught by the fire commission, every effort was 
made to keep young Healy in his place. 
Political The civil service rule in this case is 
Favorites that reinstatement shall not take place 
without the consent of the civil service 
commission. It would be interesting to know 
whether the fire commission would have exhibited 
such a profound interest in the case if the subject 
of its great consideration had not been the son of a 
member of the city council. We see no good rea- 
son why the son of a councilman or of a police com- 
missioner or of a mayor should receive any better 
treatment, as an applicant for a city job, than the 
son of a. street sweeper. 

* * * 

"If there is going to be civil service on the job," 
says William Mulholland, referring to the work 
upon the Owens river aqueduct, "let's have it stiff." 
Mr. Mulholland is right. If the civil service rules 
are to be applied to the work in hand at all. they 
should apply in all departments and without relaxa- 
tion in favor of the cause of any particular individ- 
ual. Of course, when it comes to the consideration 
of experts a different question is presented ; but the 

rules should be applied, without fear 

Let's Have or favor, in securing ordinary labor. 

It Stiff manual or clerical. Fortunately for 

Los Angeles, the civil service com- 
mission of this city is composed of men who have 
shown a disposition to enforce the law pretty close- 
ly to the letter. The rules governing the commis- 
sion provide for exemptions in the case of skilled or 



Pacific Outlook 



expert help, and the commission undoubtedly will 
act with discretion under this provision. The com- 
mission has it in its power to prevent much petty 
grafting, and it may be depended upon to do so, so 
far as lies witfiin its prerogatives. 

* * * 

"Before the bugbear of adverse criticism the 
Times has never quailed when it was convinced of 
the rightfulness of its cause," declares General Otis 
in his "twenty-five years and a day" editorial. " 'Be 
just and fear not' is one of the chosen mottoes for 
our guidance." Another motto which the vainglori- 
ous editor of the Times might have had inscribed 
upon the escutcheon of his paper reads like this: 
"A bad man is worst when he pretends 

Some to be a saint." Or this: "Fame is like 
Mottoes a river, that beareth up things light and 
swollen and drowns things weighty and 
solid." Or, finally, this : "Round dealing is the hon- 
or of man's nature ; and a mixture of falsehood is 
like alloy in gold and silver, which may make the 
metal work the better, but it debaseth it." These 
are pretty good mottoes for everybody. They are 
especially commended to the editors of all daily 
newspapers who go home after their day's labor to 
laugh in their sleeves at the manner in which the} 1 
have succeeded in fooling the people on that par- 
ticular day. 

* * * 

It is just as well that the status of the public 
thoroughfare on Fourth street, between Broadway 
and Hill, is to be settled in the courts. Walter 
Cosby, an automobile dealer, backed by a number 
of men of means, will require the Los Angeles Pa- 
cific railroad to show its title to the ground which 
for so long it has been using as a station and freight 
depot or, if able to do so, compel it to desist from 
monopolizing public property to the hindrance of 
popular traffic. Mr. Cosby and his friends do not 
like the manner in which the police department 
treated him the other day when, after finding his 

path blocked by a car of the corn- 
Mr. Cosby pany, he refused to budge his 
and His Nerve automobile. Like thousands of 

others he felt that he had some 
rights in the street. The difference between Mr. 
Cosby and the others mentioned is that he has 
the nerve to carry his grievance into court. It will 
be a good thing for the public if he fight the mat- 
ter to a finish. The streets are generally believed 
to be public thoroughfares amd not camping 
grounds for public utility corporations. And the 
police department is supposed to be maintained for 
the purpose of affording protection to citizens as 
well as to corporations. For the sake of the prin- 
ciples involved, it is to be hoped that Mr. Cosby 
will stand firm, as he promises to do, on the ground 



that the company and not he was the offender in 
this instance. 

* * * 

If that twenty-nine-million-dollar fine imposed by 
Judge Landis against the Standard Oil Trust be 
allowed to stand by the higher courts, it will simply 
mean that the price of oil to the consumer will be 
raised to enable the company to get the amount of 
the fine together without disturbing its surplus or 
reducing dividends. While, in principle*" the im- 
position of the fine will not be without its good 
effect, especially in that it will indicate to monopo- 
lies like Standard Oil that the people are thorough- 
ly awake and determined to compel 
The Only them to obey the laws regulating their 
Way operation, in this instance the trust 

eventually will evade punishment. 
The only way in which such monopolies may be 
reached is by amending the laws so that it will be 
possible to put the Rockefellers, the Rogerses, the 
Archbolds and the Harrimans in prison, like any 
other common criminals. The time is coming — 
let us take the optimistic view, at least — when an 
enraged people will demand that criminals of this 
class shall meet the fate that is accorded the com- 
moner criminal of the lower order. Prison is the 
only punishment that will put an end to the depre- 
dations of such monstrous rascals as the trust con- 
spirators. 

* * * 

Now that the case against Rockefeller and his 
fellow-conspirators has been decided in the court 
of first instance, the government is reported to be 
preparing to proceed in a criminal action against 
Edward H. Harriman, whose heavy hand has been 
felt with particularly disturbing force in California. 
Officials connected with the Department of Justice 
believe that the trial before Judge Landis points 
the way by which Harriman may be reached in 
criminal proceedings. That President Roosevelt 

will exert his influence to have Harri- 
Now for man adequately punished, so far as the 
Harriman law permits of the punishment of 

criminals of his kind, cannot be doubt- 
ed. Roosevelt has declared emphatically that there 
should be but one law for the rich and powerful 
and the poor criminal. While the President and 
Attorney-General Bonaparte realize that it may be 
impossible, as the law now stands, to put Harri- 
man in prison as a malefactor of the baser sort, it 
is to be hoped that such punishment as the existing 
statutes afford will be meted out to the man re- 
sponsible, along with his co-conspirators, for much 
of the misery which has been inflicted upon the 
country in recent years. 

* * * 

The proposal to establish a city workhouse on 
land owned by the city near Elysian park is to be 



Pacific Outlook 



commended. The overcrowded and highly unsani- 
tary condition of the city jail, so long a subject of 
criticism, demands that, until a new jail ma) be 
erected, s imethtng shall be done to relieve the 

mi of which complaint so long and so justl) 
ha- been made. A workhouse advantageously 
situated, and employed for the incarceration of the 

long-term prisoners — those who are 

Solution of employed in the chain gang — would 

Jail Problem go a long way toward the solution of 

the vexing problem confronting the 
city. It is doubtful if any other important city in 
the country affords the public the spectacle of great 

wagon loads of prisoners being carted to and from 
their daily labor, a considerable distance, six days 
in the week. It is a waste of time and money to 
continue the practice. If the city's property in the 
second ward can be put to the use mentioned, much 
of the present cause of complaint in regard to the 
conduct of the jail will become a thing' of the past. 

* * 9 

The first trial of municipal ownership of a light- 
ing plant in Pasadena has proven a most dismal 
failure. The report for the first month of the oper- 
ation of the plant by the city shows that the sav- 
ing to the taxpayers in the lighting of streets, fire 
houses, city hall, police department and public li- 
brary was but $813.76. The city should have saved 
during this period, according to expert estimates, 
the sum of $819.98. The fault may not lie so much 
with the management of the plant as with the users 
of lights. It would be well for the 
Pasadena's City Council of Pasadena to take the 
Experiment matter up with the public library au- 
thorities to see if it is not possible 
to induce the latter to burn fewer lights or close 
up the library a few minutes earlier each night. In 
this way it should be easy to save that additional 
$6.22 per month and demonstrate to the world that 
the expectations of the city have been completely 
met. It will not do for Pasadena to let the impres- 
sion go forth that she is able to save but $813.76 per 
month through municipal ownership of her light- 
ing system. Walter J. Ballard and his slippery pen- 
cil are too conveniently located to take the risk. 

♦ * * 

Acting under instructions from the Department 
of Commerce and Labor the local federal authorities 
will keep a closer watch upon immigration into Cali- 
fornia bv way of Mexico, exercising particular vigi- 
lance in regard to the Japanese and Chinese, wdio 
are reported to have come across the Mexican 
boundary in large numbers. Three points have been 
designated as the only places at which immigration 
shall be permitted in the future. The order is good 



so far as it goes, but the department has not gone 
far enough. It may not be cognizant of 

Contract the fact that during the past few months 

Labor hundreds of Mexican laborer.- of the most 

undesirable elass. few of whom are able 

to speak more than half a dozen words in English, 

have been brought into California in defiance of 

the federal Statute regulating contract labor. These 
are now emploved in work upon the street railways 
of Los Angeles and elsewhere, but chiefly, we are 
reliably informed, upon the Harrimau lines in this 
city and vicinity. This is in distinct violation of 
the laws regulating alien labor, and we are glad to 
take this occasion to call the attention of the local 
federal officals to the delinquency of the local em- 
ployers. 

* * * 

In the past individuals and associations of in- 
dividuals who have violated the alien contract labor 
laws have been severely punished. The violations 
of the law in Los Angeles are of a particularly fla- 
grant character, and it seems strange that the local 
labor unions have not taken the matter up and made 
the prober representations to the federal authorities 
at Washington. United States District Attorney 
Oscar Lawlor may establish himself firmly in the 
good graces of the laboring element in Los An- 
geles, as well as of all law-abiding citizens of every 
class, by exercising the functions of 
Mr. Lawlcr's his office in this direction. Of course 
Opportunity there are some who will hardly ex- 
pect Mr. Lawlor to go to this ex- 
treme, in view of the fact that all his past affilia- 
tions have been with that element in our population 
wihich is inclined to wink at violations of such 
ridiculous laws as those which prevent public util- 
ity corporations from going where they will to se- 
cure the labor they need. If Mr. Lawlor await 
orders direct from Washington, it may be a long 
time before he proceeds against the violators of the 
statutes in this respect ; but he reallv need not await 
any orders to perform his duty. It lies within his 
power to proceed in the matter at once. 

* * * 

One woman at the doors of the madhouse as the 
result of the chicancery of local "spookists" should 
be sufficient warrant in itself for the inauguration 
of drastic measures on the part of the police authori- 
ties toward the suppression of every one of these 
fakers against whom it is possible to secure evi- 
dence. The "professors" and "doctors" and other 
grafting riffraff who prey upon credulous people 
who believe that they are receiving advice from the 

other world are. in ninety-nine case- 
Transparent out of every hundred, if not in every 
Frauds case, frauds of the most diaphanous 

character. That the City Council 
should see fit to legalize this branch of "business" 



Pacific Outlook 



by licensing its representatives does that body small 
credit. There must be some plan possible by which 
Los Angeles can rid itself of these human leeches 
and vultures. The daily newspapers which print 
their advertisements, knowing the character of the 
advertisers in most cases, and the police depart- 
ment which' sleeps while they ply their nefarious 
calling are equally culpable. 

* * * 

In spite of the most vigorous efforts of the cor- 
poration opponents of public ownership of public 
utilities, the recent investigations of the public util- 
ities section of the National Civic Federation show 
that public ownership, instead of having proven a 
flat failure, has been a success, as a rule. A con- 
sensus of the opinions expressed in the various re- 
ports submitted at the convention is that public 
ownership of public utilities, where managed with 
honesty and fair business methods, is a success. 
The first and most important conclusion reached is 
that public utilities, whether in public or private 
ownership, are natural monopolies to be conducted 
under government regulation. It is also found that 
it is desirable that utilities affecting 
Public the general health should be operated 
Ownership by the public; that all grants of fran- 
chises for public utilities should be 
subject to purchase by the public at a fair valua- 
tion ; and that all public utilities under private 
management, if not purchased by the public, should 
be strictly regulated and supervised. It is quite 
natural that the report should suggest the advisa- 
bility of looking carefully after the personnel of the 
officials in whom the power of supervision and 
regulation is to be vested. That is what a govern- 
ment, national, state, county or city, should do at 
all times, whether the officials have anything to do 
with the management of public utilities or not. 
This, however, has nothing whatever to do with 
the broider question of the possibilities in the 
proposition. 

* * * 

It is rumored that Clarence Darrow has looked 
with favor on Los Angeles as a place of residence. 
He is expected to visit the city soon for the purpose 
of making a final decision. His recent success in 
the trial of Haywood has placed him in a position of 
national importance, inasmuch as he has become 
as much a representative of labor as John Mitchell 

or any union leader. However 

Suppose much opinions may differ concern- 

Darrow Comes ing his extremely radical speech to 

the weary jury at Boise, it must 
be conceded that he represents success in his espec- 
ial line of effort. If he come to Los Angeles he 
will be in a position to fight General Otis and the 
Times at close quarters. It is possible that Mr. 



Darrow's inclination to settle in Southern Califor- 
nia may be due largely to his desire to establish 
himself at the headquarters of the anti-union labor 
campaign. 

* * * 

The City Council has done a great thing, now, 
hasn't it, in naming Councilmen Blanchard and 
Healey as two of the three members of that body 
to consider the proposed new City Charter? Even 
the presence of the name of Councilman Wallace, 
the next mavor of Los Angeles, doesn't take the- 
curse off the committee. If it were not so serious 
a matter the appointment of Healey, in particular, 
might be regarded in the light of a jest. Both 
Messrs. Blanchard and Healey are out-and-out ma- 
chine politicians. Mr. Blanchard recently has 
evinced a disposition to keep Iris ear to the ground 
listening to the rumblings of public 

Has a sentiment, but his history as a ward 
Bad Odor politician well illustrates his corpora- 
tionward proclivities. It is a thorough- 
ly recognized fact that the public utility and other 
corporations will use their utmost efforts to secure 
certain changes in the proposed charter more favor- 
able to their interests than those conferred by the 
existing document. This being known, it looks 
as if the appointment of two machine men of the 
most pronounced stripe, along with but one council- 
man who may be depended upon to employ his 
labors toward safeguarding the interests of the city, 
were nothing short of an inning in the fascinating, 
if dangerous, game of local politics. 

* * * 

Every day the need of training for parents is 
brought to public notice. In Los Angeles last Sun- 
day six Mexican families lost their homes because a 
five-year-old boy was afraid to tell his mother that 
he had accidentally started a fire in an Alameda 
street cellar. After the damage was done the child 
was suspected and he confessed that he had been 
exploring with a candle. After he had betrayed 
fear of parental correction, his mother demonstrated 
that he was justified in his anticipation of trouble 
for the woman gave the child a knock on the head 
and a scolding. The fact that ignorant, careless 
women least fitted to bear the re- 
The Parents sponsibilities of motherhood have 
to Blame the most children has caused so- 
ciological students and philosophers 
to write endless pages suggesting theoretical re- 
forms, and yet, with all the boasted progress of the 
age, little is done to overcome conditions which 
produce criminals and derelicts. When schools for 
mothers of every class are established a long step 
will be taken toward civic reform. The mothers' 
meetings at the various public schools have been 
intended to meet what is a recognized demand, but 
the are really inadequate, inasmuch as they do not 



Pacific Outlook 



9 



i the homes where aid is needed. N'o thinker 
can help feeling that there should be a compulsory 
education law for mothers and for fathers. It is 
needed quite as much as the one now controlling 

children. The wisdom i f a sage is needed t" roar a 
child. 

* * * 

Every earnest woman who has had the care 
and daughters has re ilized that mi ral, ethical 
and civic ideals must he implanted From babyhood. 

I-'. eery mother has had to face man) problems 
where the utmost tact and the finest diplomacy 
were needed. In all schools teachers are forced to 
assume duties that properl) belong to the parents 
■ :f pupils. Day after day they are confronted by 
evidences that mothers habitually deceive their 
children and unintentionally teach the habit of ut- 
tering untruths. It is known that too often punish- 
ment is meted out as a vent for parental indignation 
rather than as a corrective measure. Most common 
of all is the neglect of which mothers who belong 

to the highest classes are guilty. 

Great Social How many women know what their 

Problem children are thinking? How many 

possess the entire confidence of their 
si in-, and daughters? The mother who struck her 
five-year-old son, terror stricken as the result of his 
careless misdeed, was much .more culpable than the 
little incendiary. The time should net be far off 
when the state and the city will take measures to 
interfere in families where the- duty to the child is 
ignored or misunderstood. When mothers are com- 
pelled to hold diplomas showing that they have 
studied the psychology of childhood, the laws of 
hygiene and the right relation of parents to their 
offspring, less of the public money will be spent in 
the maintenance of jails, asylums and houses of 
correction. 

* * * 

"It gives me great pleasure to inform you that 
your son. Earl Sims, who is about the most worthl- 
ess scoundrel I ever saw. is a deserter from the 
United States Army. I sincerely hope to see him 
behind the bars for at ieast two years. I hope this 
will be a source of condolence to you." This was 

the message sent by Lieuten- 

What Constitutes ant Trumbo of Fortress Mon- 

a Gentleman roe to the mother of a deserter. 

The court-martial decided, af- 
ter a lengthy hearing, that Lieutenant Trumbo was 
not guilty of "conduct unbecoming an officer and 
a gentleman." and let him off with a sentence to 
two months' confinement to the limits of the sta- 
tion. ■ If the army authorities do not consider the 
language employed by this cad as beneath the dig- 
nity of a gentleman, officer or not. what, in the 
name of heaven, is the standard by which thev 
gauge gentlemen? 



The club women and equal suffragists of Los 
Angeles should take t < » hear) the suggestions em- 
anating from I'. iville. Mo., whose hading club 

woman, Miss Anna L. Clarke, says: "I have always 

liked Longfellow's idea of the children's hour, but 
a husband's hour is an absolute necessity. Have 
your husband's slippers ready when he gets home, 
give him a l;o(i,1 dinner and then take your John 
l-i one side for a cozy chat, tell him just what you 
want politically and you can get anything. A hus- 
band's hour is as good as equal suf- 
Half Better frage and you don't have to wait a 
Than None lifetime to get results." Miss Clarke 
may take too roseate a view of the in- 
fluence of woman over her husband in matters poli- 
tical, but there is no doubt that the average woman 
has enough influence over the individual erroneous- 
ly termed her "lord and master" to persuade him 
to do many things that he might not do without 
first listening to the advice of his thoughtful better 
half. As the Pacific Outlook has pointed out be- 
fore, the experiment suggested by Miss Clarke is 
worth trying. Half a. loaf is better than none. 

* * * 

The anti-Japanese spouters on the Pacific coast 
may find food for reflection in the crusade "against 
the exploitation of one race by another, either com- 
mercially or socially," which recently has been in- 
augurated in Brooklyn by the Cosmopolitan So- 
ciety, which numbers among its members men rep- 
resenting practically every race and nationality in 
America. The anti-Japanese crusade, the "Jim 
Crow" car and race prejudice generally are targets 
for the shafts of this association. One of the mem- 
bers outlines the aims of the organization as fol- 
lows: "We have got together a society of men made 
up of all the various races to discuss the best 
ni"thod to bring them all together so that all their 
interests will be the same, and also to wipe out both 
social and commercial injustices that exist at pres- 
ent. Now I don't want it understood that the so- 
ciety is pushing a progaganda for the intermarriage 

of the races, for it is not. although 
Against Race many members would, I believe, 
Exploitation like to see the day come when that 

will be possible. We are entering 
on a campaign against all exploitation of one race 
by another. For example, the people of the South 
treat the negro as though he were a child and in 
some cases as an animal. We want equal justice 1m 
all, an exact administration of the laws, and above 
all an equal chance for all commercially, not onlv 
for the colored race, but for the workingmen of the 
white race as well, in contradistinction to the own- 
ership class of the various races, who buy the labor 
of the wage worker, but at their own price and that 
price one which does not give the worker a chance 
equal with the ownership class. You can eee now 



; 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



that there is nothing new in the idea and that it is 
somewhat socialistic, but we simply mean to dis- 
cuss the problems at present in an endeavor to try 
to find some practical solution." 

* * * 

Coming as it does immediately after the most 
elaborate and most costly reception given in Lon- 
don this season, the announcement that Whitelaw 
Reid, ambassador to the Court of St. James, desires 
to be relieved of his high office does not surprise 
any one who takes time to count the cost of diplo- 
matic honors. Mr. Reid set for himself a standard 
of social achievement that of necessity must have 
a tendency to bankrupt him physically and finan- 
cially. When he took Dorchester House, a palace 
of historic interest, he began a series of entertain- 
ments which are said to have been 
Bad Precedent more brilliant than any essayed by 
Established his contemporary representatives 
of the various powers. His last 
social achievement was his Fourth of July recep- 
tion, at which more than five thousand guests en- 
joyed a princely hospitality. This one lavish "at 
home" cost a fortune, and while it eclipsed all 
previous social efforts jon the part of an American 
ambassador, it will not place Mr. Reid's services to 
his country on the same page of history as that 
made brilliant by Lowell, Hay, Phelps, Choate and 
other of his predecessors. President Roosevelt is 
now confronted with the alternative of sending one 
of our celebrated multi-millionaires to take Mr. 
Reid's place or of choosing for the distinction some 
one who will act as an apostle of the simple life. 

* * * 

The president of the Inter-Metropolitan railway 
of New York states that a passenger may travel 
further for a nickel on the surface lines of that city 
than anywhere else in the country. By using all 
the transfer privileges accorded patrons, one may 
travel a distance of thirty-seven and a half miles for 
five cents. Philadelphia comes second to New 
York in this respect, with a twenty-six-mile ride for 
one fare. The average for the ten principal cities 
of the country is a trifle more than nineteen miles,. 

Just where Los Angeles stands in this 

Long Ride list has not yet been made generally 

For a Nickel known. But it is safe to say that it 

stands very far from either New 
York or Philadelphia. One may ride about three 
miles on the Hollywood-Santa Monica line, a little 
further on the Long Beach, San Pedro and Hunt- 
ington Beach lines, seven or eight miles, perhaps, 
on the southern route to Santa Monica, and, by 
transfer, quite a snug distance on the city lines. 
When we get a better system of transfers Los An- 
geles, with what we believe to be the finest electric 
car system in the country, if not in the world, may 



afford the world the spectacle of a continuous ride 
approximating that given in the eastern cities noted. 

* * * 

As a manufacturer of textiles California is pro- 
gressing. The capital invested in this branch of in- 
dustry increased from $1,819,481 in 1900 to $2,855,- 
729 in 1905 ; and during the same period the value 
of the products manufactured in this state shows an 
increase from $1,463,936 to $2,251,884. The aver- 
age number of wage earners employed 
Textiles in in manufacturers in 1905 was 1,267 as 
California compared with 922 five years before, 
and the total wages and salaries show 
an increase from $391,928 to $583,808. The profits 
accruing to the manufacturers may easily be com- 
puted when it is known that the cost of the ma- 
terials used rose .during this period from $886,260 
to $1,304,267. It is interesting to note that during, 
these five years California had but one cotton mill. 
The knit goods mills rose in number from three to 
five, shoddy mills from none to three, woolen mills 
from five to eight, while the number of silk mills 
fell from five to four. 

* * * 

WHAT NOTED PEOPLE SAY 



F. E. Dunbar, Boston Manufacturer 

To the city dweller, especially if in a manufactur- 
ing community, are brought home forcibly some of 
the problems arising from our national policy of 
substantially unrestricted immigration. Among the 
many attracted to city life are probably most of 
those who under more rigorous laws would be, or 
at least should be, excluded from the country; and 
this tends to make assimilation more difficult, and 
puts a heavier burden on the individual citizens as 
well as on the municipality and the state. Espe- 
cially must the patriotic American, whether native 
or adopted, feel bound to give his best thought and 
effort to meeting adequately the difficult situation 
existing. 



Dr. Felix Adler 

The conjugal relation has a twofold aspect : It 
is a relation between the partners in marriage them- 
selves, and a relation to offspring. A characteristic 
feature of militant individualism is that in the dis- 
cussion of marriage the former of these aspects is 
preferentially emphasized, While the latter is more 
or less thrown into the shade. The right of mar- 
ried persons to obtain relief from a tie which is no 
longer pleasing is considered from the point of view 
of their own happiness, while the rights of the 
children as affected by divorce are treated with the 
most superficial attention. 

In the face of many heretical opinions that are 
now spreading in the community with respect to 
marriage, the reasons must be made plain why the 
permanence of this relation is so essential to - indi- 
vidual and public welfare. There is a disposition 
at the present time, due largely to the ever-increas- 
ing influence of science, to rebel against mere au- 
thority in every sphere, in the sphere of conduct as 
well as of thought. The most ancient traditions, 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



the ni">t sacred institutions, an- summoned before 
the bar of reason to give an account of themselves 

and to justify their claims. < >f this tendency among 
civilized nations we must take note, and the reasons 
must be adduced for the permanency of the mar- 
riage relation. Those who offer reason-, for experi- 
mental marriage and the like, in short, for relaxing 
the tie — fatuous and ignoble reasons, a* most of us 
believe — must be met with stronger and better rea- 
sons. It will not do merel) to invoke immemorial 
custom or sanctified authority. Two main reasons 
may he succinctly stated a* follows: For the part- 
ners themselves of the marriage contract, the ex- 
pectation of permanency in the relation is indis- 
pensable, because it is the permanency alone that 
makes the relation pure, noble and human, and dis- 
tinguishes it from the sexual commerce of the lower 
animals. For the child that springs from the con- 
jugal relation, the permanency of marriage is in- 
dispensable, because the permanent home is neces- 
sary to insure its best development, because the 
child needs both parents in order that it may grow 
in the best possible manner, physically, mentally 
and morallv. 



President Luther of Trinity College 

When shall our legislatures be made up of men 
skilled in the science of government? When shall 
i^ress number in its membership a majority of 
statesmen? The answer to this is in the hands of 
school committees, of teachers, of those who direct 
our high-school courses, of the men who control our 
colleges and universities. We exact a license for 
the man who controls a steamship or a locomotive, 
in many states for the man who drives an automo- 
bile. We will not let a man practice medicine or 
surgery upon our bodies unless we are satisfied that 
he knows something of his profession. Lawyers are 
jealous that none shall be admitted to the bar who 
are in ignorance of legal practice. Teachers must 
pass some sort of an examination. The journeyman 
in any trade must have served a period of apprentice- 
ship or something equivalent thereto. But we in- 
trust the mighty destinies of commonwealths and 
of the nation to men whose capacity for such a task 
is absolutely unknown — to any man who, by reason 
of circumstances, is likely to have friends enough to 
elect him. Surely this is wrong; surely it is amaz- 
ing' that we should have got on as well as v we have 
under such a system. 1 have faith to believe that 
the time is at hand when we shall recognize politics 
as a profession, training for which is as necessarv 
as the training for any other difficult and important 
service, and that with that shall be combined an 
educated population able to discern between poli- 
cies, as well as earnest to support the right as they 
see it. 



General Stewart L. Woodford 

Measured he all existing conditions and judged 
by all reasonable forecast of the future, war between 
Japan and the United States would be a crime 
against history. Less than sixtv years ago Japan 
was a closed empire. She did not seek admission 
into I he concert of nations. She was content with 
her own civilization, her own development, her own 
isolation. We roused her from her sleep qf cen- 
turies. We took her by the hand and presented her 
to the nations of the West. We are responsible be- 



fore God and man for her new life, for what she has 
done, and for what shi is today. 

Measured b\ all existing conditions and judged 
bj all reasonable forecast of the future, war be- 
tween Japan and the United Stales would he a 
crime against religion. Me and the Christian na- 
tions of the West were nol contenl that Japan 
should remain Shintoist, Buddhist, or Confucian. 

\\ e sent our missionaries. Japan gave them wel- 
come. Today thev are established and at work. 1 
have traveled somewhat in Japan and speak what 
1 have seen anil know,. Nowhere in the world is 
there more absolute and complete religious freedom 
and toleration for all creeds and forms of worship 
than in Japan today. 

Measured by all existing conditions and judge 1 
by all reasonable forecast of the future, war be- 
tween Japan and the United States would be a 
crime against labor and commerce. We occupy the 
largest area of territory and the longest line of coas* 
immediately contiguous to the Pacific of any one 
nation. Japan is today the strongest, most progres- 
sive, and most commercial of any of the Oriental 
powers. We need her commerce. She needs ours. 
W e are her natural customer. She is ours. Bj- 
tween her and us there must be sharp, keen, earnes* 
industrial and commercial rivalry. Let this be 
brave, honorable, peaceful, and may the best men 
win. If the true problem of industry is to secure 
the largest employment that is useful and congenial, 
to the greatest number of workers at the best 
wages ; if the true problem of commerce is to se- 
cure the largest interchange of desirable products 
between the nations, then war between these two 
great powers of the Pacific would be a crime 
against labor and commerce. 

* * * 

John D.'s Defi 

John D. Rockefeller is represented as issuing his 
"defi" to the United States government in the fol- 
lowing words : "Judge Landis will be dead a long 
time before this fine is paid. In fact, many things 
may happen before that." This is the remark 
which the Sandard Oil king is said to have made, 
before attending divine service on Sunday, in com- 
menting upon the fine of $29,240,000 imposed upon 
the Standard Oil Company-. This expression is an ■ 
evidence of the supreme optimism of Mr. Rocke- 
feller who evidently regards a fine of $29,240,000 as 
a matter of small consequence, in fact Mr. Rocke- 
feller seems to be quite confident of the ability of 
Standard Oil attorneys to defy the government and 
defeat the penalty imposed upon the corporation 
for the violation of the law', says the ( lakland En- 
quirer. The Standard Oil Company has been im- 
mune so long that it is evidently incredulous of 
the fact that the United States government is 
bigger than the Standard Oil Company. If Mr. 
Rockefeller were just an ordinary criminal and the 
law made it possible to impose the alternative of 
imprisonment for the non-payment of fine, it is in- 
teresting to speculate what might have been the 
result. At the usual option of one day's imprison- 
ment for every two dollars fine, the penalty im- 
posed upon the Standard Oil Company by Judge 
Landis would have been approximately 81 10 vears' 
imprisonment. Possibly under an equitable distri- 
bution of responsibility, this sentence might have 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



been meted to the various officers of the Standard 
Oil corporation who would thereby have been in- 
carcerated for the rest of their natural lives. As it 
stands, however, the fine of $29,240,000 is a mere 
baeatelle which may be taxed against the consumer 
and will scarcely be missed by Mr. Rockefeller and 
his associates. 

in view of the fact that the fine imposed, upon the 
Standard Oil Company of $29,240,000 is "the largest 
penalty in the annals of Anglo-Saxon jurispur- 
dence," it should not be forgotten that the Standard 
Oil Company is the biggest corporate criminal in 
the annals of Anglo-Saxon jurisprudence; that it 
has ruthlessly crushed out competition ; that it has 
ridden rough-shod over the constitution and the 
laws and subverted the fundamental principle of 
democracy, equality of opportunity; that it has been 
the promoter of the iniquitous system of special 
privilege; that it has reaped inordinate gain 
through rebates; that it has grown rich and arro- 
gant and defiant until it has become a power within 
the government that has challenged the supremacy 
of the government itself and now in view of all 
these facts, Mr. John D. Rockefeller calmly defies 
the court to enforce the penalty of the law. This 
arrogant arch conspirator against the common- 
wealth truculently exclaims: "Judge Landis will 
be dead a long time before this fine is paid. In fact, 
many things may happen before that." Perhaps 
some things may happen which John D. Rocke- 
feller is not looking for ; perhaps Mr. Rockefeller 
has not counted upon the fact that it is clearly 
within the power of the federal court according to 
lire pleadings and contention of counsel in the case 
against the tobacco trust for the court to place a 
receiver in charge of the business of this contuma- 
cious corporation and, if necessary, to wind up its 
business as criminal and unlawful and to revoke its 
charter. Many other things have taken place of 
which Mr. John D. Rockefeller is unmindful and one 
of these things is a change in public sentiment and 
a determination on the part of the American people 
to hold up the hands of President Roosevelt and the 
other officers of the United States government and 
of the judiciary" in maintaining the supremacy of 
law and the integrity of the courts in this country. 
When Mr. Rockefeller undertakes to defy the gov- 
ernment and the courts of the American people, it 
is high time to determine whether Mr. Rockefeller 
or the courts are supreme. 

* * * 

French View of tHe Apaches 

France is becoming alarmed lest the savage 
Apaches of Arizona wipe the whites in that terri- 
tory off the earth. Le Petit Parisien, a gaudily 
illustrated Paris publication, devotes the first page 
of its issue of July 21 to a picture of a meeting of 
the "Apache warriors in revolt in Arizona." The 
members of the group are in full war paint and 
feathers, ready to "do things" to the white inhabi- 
tants. On another page appears the following : 

"It has long been said that the Indians of Ameri- 
ca, entirely subdued, or rather tamed by the con- 
tact of civilization, were incapable of revolting any 
more as they so often used to do. 

"Now, however, it seems that a great animation 
reiens among the tribes; the Apaches are preparing, 
under cover, a bloody revolt and the frightened 



population is demanding aid and protection from 
the government. 

"It is especially in Arizona that the most fero- 
cious and unmanageable of the Indian tribes are 
on the verge of a new uprising. 

"The American Apaches are, as is known, always 
on a war footing with the whites ; but what can 
they (alone) do against the regular troops? They 
count but 8,000 men, but they would have some 
chance of success, at least at first, if the entire In- 
dian population, which mav be estimated at 275,000 
men, should revolt with them. 

"In the meantime they are sending into Arizona 
a body of troops to reassure the agricultural popu- 
lation of that territory." 

* * * 

To Discuss Municipal Affairs 

The League of California Municipalities, which 
will meet in convention in Pasadena next Novem- 
ber, is unique among American institutions. It is 
intended at this meeting to divide the work of the 
league into departments, or sections, each consist- 
ing of city officials having to deal with the same 
duties in their respective municipalities. An effort 
will be made to induce the state association of 
health officials to meet in Pasadena at the same 
time, and it has been suggested that, the Fourth 
District Library Association and the civics sections 
of the women's clubs also might convene then.. 

* * * 
Reserved for tHe Rich 

"Americans when traveling often feel pangs of 
jealousy when noting how little their flag is in evi- 
dence in foreign ports," writes John P. Young, 
editor of the San Francisco Chronicle, in Sunset. 
"It takes some philosophy and a thorough con- 
sciousness of the fact that we prefer to invest our 
money in profitable pursuits at home rather than 
chase the elusive dividend on the high seas, to 
escape feeling bad over being outstripped in any 
particular. Still there is some consolation to be 
had. If our flag is an unfamiliar sight in foreign 
lands, California canned fruit is not. You find it 
everywhere, but unfortunately it is dear — so dear, 
indeed, in some cases as to suggest that it is a 
delicacy reserved for the very rich." 

* * 9 

Saloon Graft 

"Speaking of graft — what about the graft of the 
saloon licensing system?" asks Reynold E. Blight 
in the August number of Fellowship. "Here is a 
traffic condemned by the Supreme Courts of the 
United States, the religious bodies, industry, and 
the consensus of public opinion, and yet for a fee, 
large or small, our municipalities, with few excep- 
tions, permit and protect the nefarious business. 
The meanest and most degrading graft is that 
which preys upon the weakness and foolishness of 
our fellowmen, and makes money by pandering to 
their vices. Why censure the petty individual graft- 
er while the municipality is involved in a greater 
and more demoralizing graft? Let us be con- 
sistent." • 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



THE CITY'S BIG WASTE PIPE 



Outfall Sewer, Once Declared Impracticable of Construction, Nearly Finished 



By the ICditor 



"Well, wove got a hole through," remarked one 
of the men engaged in boring the [0,750-fool tunnel 
for the outfall sewer as City Engineer Homer Ham- 
lin and the writer crawled up to the spot where the 
two holes under a hundred feet of earth were about 
to meet late Friday afternoon of last week. 

In the center of a wall of clay which separated 
the two sections of the long tunnel, 4ie one being 
pushed toward the northeast meeting, to the frac- 
tion of an inch, the section being bored toward the 
southwest, the workmen had picked out a hole two 
or three inches in diameter through which could be 
seen the long row of incandescent electric lamps 
which lighted the laborers in the southern section 
of the tunnel. 

"Well. I'm glad enough to see that little hole," 
said Mr. Hamlin. "We've been waiting for it a 
long time. It means that within a few hours the 
tunnel will be completed and the work that was 
once said to be impossible of performance has been 
accomplished." And Mr. Hamlin breathed a gentle 
sigh of relief and satisfaction. 

The problems confronting the city and the city 
engineer's department in this great undertaking, in 
some respects the greatest in the West, have been 
manifold. When the proposition to construct a 
great outlet sewer from Los Angeles to the sea was 
first advanced many persons, including some- ex- 
perienced engineers, said that it could not be done. 
It was known that much of the earth through which 
the long hole would have to be dug was little less 
than quicksand, and engineers have learned by ex- 
perience that work through dirt of this character 
is a serious problem. But the rapidly growing city 
of Los Angeles was confronted by the serious ques- 
tion of disposing of the constantly increasing vol- 
ume of sewage. The old sewer had practically out- 
grown its usefulness. It would do for a city of a 
hundred thousand or so, but Los Angeles had al- 
ready passed that mark by many thousands of in- 
habitants and there were those who predicted that 
the time would come when the needs of a city of 
twice its size at that time would have to be con- 
sidered. When the sewage of the town is finally 
turned into the big trunk sewer that "twice the 
size" will be here asking to be accommodated. As 
a matter of fact, it is here already. 

The new outfall will be ample to relieve Los An- 
geles of its fluid refuse even when the million mark 
is reached. Its capacity will be about one hundred 
second feet, or four or five times that of the waste 
pipes now in use. And what is better yet, there 
is no danger that the new works will be in need of 
replacing during the life of the present generation — 
at least not until after Los Angeles shall have taken 
her rank among the cities of a million — unless some 
great cataclysm should intervene. 

It is passing strange that more interested persons 
have not taken the time and slight trouble to see 
for themselves this gigantic work which is to fur- 
nish to this city the relief which it has needed for 
several years. Now and then some person con- 
nected with the city government who has a pench- 



ant for inquiring into everything done by public 
officials has gone down to some point at which the 
work of construction has been in progress, and oc-. 
casional visits have been made by disinterested en- 
gineers, but there are in the city very few persons 
who know from personal observation anything 
about the nature of the wonderful undertaking 
which will be turned over to the use of the inhabit- 
ants during the next four months, barring unfore- 
seen delays on account of accidents. But if the 
record of the past be maintained, there will be few 
delays on account of accident. When one consid- 
ers the soft, spongy, almost fluid state of much of 
the earth through which the sewer has been run, it 
is remarkable that there have been so few accidents. 
There have been a few cave-ins — not worth men- 
tioning — and one man has been killed, as the result 
of his own negligence, but it is safe enough to assert 
that the work bears the record for safety, speed and 



■T ■ ■ . , ' ' 



I 




ARCH FORMATION IN THE i UNNHL 



economy, when its size and importance and the 
drawbacks under which Mr. Hamlin and the Board 
of Public Works have labored are considered. 

It is difficult for one to gain an adequate idea of 
the magnitude of this undertaking without inspect- 
ing it — not simply visiting the scene of operations 
and getting a surface view of the works, but drop- 
ping down through one of the shafts into the tunnel 
which has been bored through the ground for a dis- 
tance of twelve and a fifth miles. When the firm 
of Stansbury & Powell, which entered into a con- 
tract with the city to build the great sewer, aban- 
doned their work last summer because they found 
they could not complete it within the amount speci- 
fied in their contract, the city authorized the city 
engineer to continue the work, under the general 
direction of the new Board of Public Works, con- 
sisting of Messrs. James N. Anderson, D. K. Ed- 
wards and A. A. Hubbard. The three contractors 
offering bids for the construction of the tunnel, the 
most difficult and expensive part of the undertak- 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



ing, offered to do th 
$376,539 and $415.0 
mate was $352,128. 
which any of the pr 
perform the labor, 
city's estimate was 
principle of public 
municipal ownershi 



is part of the work for $370,833, 
3 respectively. The city's esti- 
a lower figure than that at 

ivate contractors had offered to 
For the entire undertaking the 
$614,440. Opponents of the 
ownership, and especially of 

p and construction of public 




Open Cot Work on Section 5 

utilities, will find food for reflection in the fact that 
the work will be performed for the amount esti- 
mated, and possibly for a few thousands of dollars 
. less. This showing emphasizes the great desir- 
ability of placing municipal departments like that of 
public works in the hands of men of unquestioned 
integrity, who are thinking first, last and all the 
time of the interests of the city, and who never de- 
scend to "playing politics". 

On August I, 1506, when the firm of private con- 
tractors threw up the job because they could not do 
the work for the sum for which the had offered to 
build the outfall sewer, they had driven 3,898 feet 
of the tunnel, leaving 6,852 feet of the total distance 
of 10,750 feet to be built by the city. Of the five 
sections of the tunnel, the distances not completed 
were as follows: Section 1, 6.419.5 linear feet; sec- 
tion 2, 3,500.5 feet ; section 3, 9,440 feet : section 4, 
3,050 feet; section 5, 3,298 feet, a total of 25,708 
feet, or 4.87 miles. Sections 2 and 3 passed through 
wet ground, difficult of operation, principally quick- 
sand of a nature so treacherous that it was found to 
be necessary to board up the "breasts" of the cut to 
prevent cave-ins. The character of the earth for a 
distance of nearly two and a half miles was enough 
to discourage most private contractors, and, as has 



been stated, before the work was begun the opinion 
was expressed by some, including experienced en- 
gineers, that a sewer or other conduit could not be 
constructed through this part of the country. The 
private contractors had directed their energies to 
the driving of the tunnel through the comparatively 
dry ground only, a distance of 3,898 feet, leaving 
the most difficult and dangerous part of the task 
to be performed by City Engineer Hamlin. 

In November, 1906, Mr. Hamlin put a small force 
of men at work, leaving the management of the 
field 1 work to A. C. Hansen, assistant city engineer. 
During that month about fifty feet of the tunnel 
was driven and timbered. The work was not pushed 
until the firsr»of December, but since that time work 
has never ceased for an hour. Three shifts of men 
have been kept at work, the day being divided into 
three working days of eight hours each. As many 
as six hundred, men have been employed at one time 
since December, but the average number has been 
about four hundred and fifty. Most of these men 
have been whites. The civil service rules were 
waived so far as labor was concerned, on account 
of the great emergency that existed. The rate of 
pay has run from $2.25 to $3.50 per day for common 
laborers, masons receiving seven dollars per day. 

The original bid accepted by the city in the sum 
of $565,000 was submitted to S. J. Edwards of Pasa- 




Showing Completed Sewer on Section 5 

dena and by him assigned to Stansbury &, Powell 
July 14, 1904. There has been paid to Stansbury & 
Powell on their contract $336,881.25, and in addi- 
tion $32,733.59 has been paid to them for lumber 
and extras, making a total of $369,614.84, beside 
which the city has paid to them during the time 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



they had charge of the work $245,204.01 for ma- 
terial and miscellaneous items. The total expendi- 
ture, therefore, up to ilu- time the city assumed 
charge "i" the outfall sower was $614,818.85. ( )ut of 
the original bond issue of $1,000,000. in addition to 
the expenditures on the sewer there had been ex- 
pended $89,113.10 on certain main sewers in the 
city, making a total expenditure of $703,931.95 out 
of the bond issue of 1903. At the time the city un- 
dertook to complete the Sewer there remained of 
this fund the sum of $296,068.05. 

The sewer is constructed, from one end to the 
other, of brick and Portland cement. It is cylindri- 
cal in form, the interior surface of the base, about 
half way to the top. being covered with a thin layer 
of cement in order that. the How of the sewage may 
be facilitated. Two layers of brick are used, except 
in the tunnel, where it has been found advisable to 
use three layers on account of the excessive weight 
of the hundred feet or so of earth pressing down 
upon the arch. It is evident even to the casual ob- 
server that the work is constructed for all time. Six 
feet in diameter, a person of average height may 
walk through it the entire cfistance of over twelve 
miles withou stooping. With the greatest flow yet 
known, even in the period of greatest demand, it 
is not likely that the outfall will be more than one- 
fourth filled with sewage until the city attains a 
much greater population than at present. It is a 
sewer for a million, and one may truthfully say that 
it is almost a sewer in a million. Under the careful 
supervision of the Board of Public Works and City 
Engineer Hamlin and his assistant, Mr. Hansen, 
the funds of the city have been most economically 
administered, not a dollar having been wasted. 
"With the completion of the work about four months 
hence, Los Angeles will be in a position to prove 
her contention that she is entitled to rank among 
the first cities of the country as regards the sani- 
tary precautions she takes for the benefit of her 
rapidly increasing population. 

The photographs from which the cuts of the out- 
fall sewer accompanying this article were made 
were taken by Mr. Hamlin. The portrait of Mr. 
Hamlin which appears on the front cover is from a 
photograph by Mojonier. 

* * * 

-A "Job" on tKe President 

Senator Philander C. Knox. Pennsylvania's Presi- 
dential aspirant, told this story to the Elks com- 
mittee at Valley Forge the other day. 

"President Roosevelt," he said, "was surprised 
by a Kansas delegation at Oyster Bay not long age 
The President appeared with coat and collar off, 
trousers hitched by belt and mopping his forehead. 

" 'Ah. gentlemen,' he said, 'delighted to see you, 
delighted. But I'm very busy putting in my hay, 
you know. Just come down to the barn with me 
and we'll talk it over while I work.' 

"Down to the barn hustled delegation and Presi- 
dent. 

"Mr. Roosevelt seized a pitchfork. But, behold, 
there was no hay on the floor! 'John, John,' shout- 
ed the President to sounds in the hayloft, 'where's 
all the hay?' 

" 'I ain't had time to throw it back, sir, since you 
threw it up vesterday, sir.' come a man's voice 
from the loft." 



"Largtlt and Final Stotk 9/ Furniture in the lf'r-t" 

TW INING ROOM FURNITURE 

A Jv From the Royal Furniture Co., of Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Vf The plain, simple lines of the Old Colonial and Sheraton styles 
appeal to every lover of good furniture. They cannot be im- 
proved upon. The designers of the Royal Furniture Co. have been 
most successful in reproducing these desirable styles, and every piece 
is perfect in construction. We have an extensive line of these fine pieces. 
Prompt delivery in perfect condition. Store closed Saturday at noon 
during this month. 



wyumihirc. (To 

,-.,.,., 640-646 SOUTH HILL ST. * 



May L. Evans and Vera E. Herrmann 

Public Stenographers 
Notaries Public .... 

Appointments can be made for Evening or Sunday Work 

p l „ I Home F 6904 

Phones J Main 5 , 54 

CONVENIENT TO ALL PRINCIPAL HOTELS 
Opposite Angelus. one block from Van Nuys, one block from Alexan- 
dria, one block from Westminster, in the center 
of the business district 

Suite Four Hundred and Ten Union Trust Building 




P\ire Air is Curing 

Consumption 



In diseases of the Lungs, Heart and Kidneys, you 
need more oxygen than you are getting; Pure air 
without dangerous drafts, secured by sleeping in the 
cottage built for health. 

WALKER PORTABLE COTTAGE 
On exhibition, rear 420 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Sci sso r s, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



PHONE HOME A 4432 

4TM ST. STORE 



F 7671 ; MAIN 4604 
SPRING St. store 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST 



16 



Pacific Outlook 



LINCOLN'S FAMOUS SAYING 



The Motto of the New Republican Organization in California 



One of the most important of the epoch-making 
gatherings known to the history of California was 
that which took place on August I at Oakland, re- 
sulting in the organization of a body of fearless, 
independent Republican fighters into a League of 
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican Clubs of California. 
The movement had its inception in a gathering of 
men, hardly more than a dozen, in Los Angeles 
about two months ago. Those who attended this 
meeting were, for the most part, men who have 
been active in the struggle for decent government 
in this state for years past. It was called by one of 
the younger newspaper men of California, Edward 
W. Dickson, associate editor of the Los Angeles 
Express, who has entertained the notion that, 
through perfect and harmonious organization, the 
final elimination of the abominable Southern Pacific 




Edward W. Dickson 

Founder of the "League of Liucoln-Roosevelt Republican Clubs of 

California" 

railroad as the chief factor in state, county and city 
politics in this state might be brought about. 

Mr. Dickson is a young man, a fighter, careless of 
the consequences to himself, but thinking always of 
the good of the whole people. Through the columns 
of the Express he and Harley W. Brundige, its 
editor-in-chief, have made themselves felt as di- 
rectors of public opinion on political matters, not 
only in Southern California but throughout the en- 
tire state. Early in March he confided a rough 
outline of his plans to the editor of the Pacific Out- 
look. One by one men prominent and influential 
for good were consulted until, about two months 
later, the first general conference was held. At this 
meeting there were assembled twelve or fifteen men 



of this stamp, all of whom were recognized as able 
exponents of the honest government idea,, of the 
idea that the Republican party of California should 
govern itself and not be allowed to remain longer 
as the instrument by which the Southern Pacific 
machine, with itsHerrins and Parkers, its Burkes 
and Hattons, should hold the state in its grip — a 
strangle hold unparalleled in the annals of Ameri- 
can politics. At that conference it was decided to 
call a meeting to be held at Oakland in July or 
August, when organization should be effected. This 
was the meeting held last Thursday. 

The independent Republican press of California, 
with some other papers which, like the Pacific Out- 
look, stand for good government without promise 
to support the candidates of either of the great 
political parties, will be organized to aid in the 
fight soon to be inaugurated. Besides this paper, the 
following already are pledged to the movement : Los 
Angeles Express, Oakland Enquirer, San Francisco 
Call, Sacramento Union, Stockton Record, Fresno 
Republican, Modesto Herald, Santa Ana Blade, 
Riverside Press, Santa Cruz Sentinel, Watsonville 
Pajaronian, Tulare Register, Pasadena News and 
other papers of influence. 

The Declaration of Principles adopted at the 
meeting last Thursday is as follows : 

Platform and Principles of the Lincoln Republican 
League. Organized in order that "Government of the 
people, by the people and for the people may not perish 
from the earth." 

The immediate and essential purposes of the Lincoln 
Republican League movement in California are: 

The emancipation of the Republican party in California 
from domination by the political bureau of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company and allied interests, and the 
reorganization of the state committee to that end. 

The selection of delegates to the next Republican na 7 
tional convention pledged to the nomination of Theodore 
Roosevelt for President, or should his nomination for .-my 
reason become impossible, then to vote for the candidate 
known to be truly committed to, and identified wittj^'Ji'is 
policies, and to oppose the nomination of any reactionary 
styled "safe and sane" by the great corporate interests. 

The election of a free, honest and capable legislature, 
trulv representative of the common interest of the people 
of California. 

The pledging of all delegates to conventions, against the 
iniquitous practice of "trading" whereby political bosses 
effect nominations by bargain and sale, and the enact- 
ment of legislation penalizing such practices. 

The enactment by the next legislature of such laws as 
will give voters an, advisory voice in the election of 
United States Senators until such time as an amendment 
to the national constitution shall make that voice direct 
and absolute, which amendment we favor. 

The pledging of candidates for the legislature to the 
enactment of such a^ primary election law as shall afford 
the party voter a direct voice in the selection of party 
candidates. 

Already the movement lias been indorsed by 
other newspapers, among which is the Los Angeles 
Herald, which, though a Democratic paper when 
national affairs are considered, says of the project : 

"Any organization which has for its object the 
elimination from politics of the state of corrupt and 
corrupting influence of the Southern Pacific politi- 
cal bureau should receive the encouragement and 
support of all honest and decent newspapers of any 



Pacific Outlook 



17 



party in which it proposes to carrv its propaganda." 
Two chief principles underlie the new movement, 

which is strictly partisan in its character. These 
arc anti-Southern Pacific and pro-Roosevelt — not 
that the organization will insist upon the renomina- 
tion of Roosevelt, bin that it will work for the 
nomination of a Presidential candidate who is 
known to be an advocate of the doctrines which 
have endeared Roosevelt to the great majority of 
the American people, almost regardless of politics. 

Tile next step will he the Organization, in the 
various communities of the state, of Lincoln-Roose- 
velt Republican clul>>. whose motto shall he "gov- 
ernment of the people, by the people and for the 
people." The voters will he called upon to align 
themselves either for or against the Southern Pa- 
cific. The lines will be so tautly drawn that none 
may evade the issue. 

The officers chosen for the central league are as 
follows: President, Frank R. Devlin, Vallejo; vice- 
presidents, Daniel A. Ryan. San Francisco; Harold 
T. Power. Auburn ; Lee C. Gates, Los Angeles ; 
Chester H. Rowell, Fresno; secretary, Irving Mar- 
tin, Stockton ; assistant secretary, Senator C. W. 
Bell, Pasadena ; treasurer, D. Edward Collins, presi- 
dent of the California State Bank, Oakland ; state 
executive committee, first congressional district, T. 
J. Xolton, Yreka ; second district, Col. E. A. Forbes, 
Sacramento; third district, Arthur H. Breed; fourth 
district, Ralph L. Hathorn ; fifth district, to be filled 
by the executive committee; sixth district, Duncan 
McPherson, Santa Cruz; seventh. district, Marshall 
Stimson, Los Angeles; eighth district, Assembly- 
man John M. Eshelman, San Diego. 

* * * 

The Man WitH tHe Mild Eyes 

"Tom" Rynning, as he is familiarly known among 
his few thousand personal friends in the land of the 
Gila monster and the rattler, former captain of the 
Arizona Rangers, now warden of the penitentiary 
at Yuma, where the leisure classes among the resi- 
dents of certain unspecified nether regions never go 
to spend the hot summer weather, is in town with 
his family, taking as voluminous whiffs of the de- 
lightful ozone of the coast as his shriveled lungs 
will hold. Captain Rynning is the mildest man- 
nered sort of a fellow, with the mildest sort of mild 
blue ey-es, the mildest sort of a voice and the mildest 
sort of a temper. And all these things combine to 
render him an extremely dangerous foe to evil 
doers. He moves about slowly, when he is not 
looking for trouble for the other fellow, but his 
right arm has become expert in the western sport 
known as the "quick draw". Captain Rynning did 
more, as head of the mounted police of Arizona, to 
discourage crime on the frontier than any other 
official with a peaceful mission. He stands very 
close to President Roosevelt. Incidentally there is 
just a chance that he may be the next Governor of 
the Territory of New Mexico. He would make a 
good one. 

* * * 

Did He Get It? 

"By the way. Jinks, can you pay that hundred 
I lent you last week?. I just lost all my ready money 
at bridge." "Look here, Binks. I hope you don't 
think I'm going to pay your gambling debts." — 
Brooklvn Life. 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place ■ 




Beach and Mountains 

Our Lines Reach Both 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

For your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE. 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



PIERCE ®, CO. 



KODAK FINISHING 

..GO TO... 

127 W. 6th St, 



£6e (gUbtfortum QBAffl anb £oifef (parfors 

^ ^—f For Ladies and Gentlemen ^^^^^^^— ■■^^■■^ 
900 AUDITORIUM BUILING 

FIFTH AND OLIVE STS 



Telephone Home F 5024 



MRS. L. PENNR1CH 



18 



Pacific Outlook 

IN THE YOSEMITE 



Great Crowds Visiting' the Famed Valley THis Season 



By Paci Bowman 



A.n ever-enlarging stream of travel is flowing to- 
ward the Yosemite. Those who make the trip will 
see the most wonderful spot in America, and it will 
be their own fault if they arenot lifted up out of 
the sordid and commonplace, and made to live bet- 
ter. But there are some of so thoughtless and triv- 
ial a mind that they unknowingly reject the gift 
Nature offers them. 

My entrance into the valley was almost spoiled by 
the stage-load of people I happened to be with — 
nice enough people, in every day life ; but in the 
presence of Nature they showed that there was 
something lacking in their make-up. When the 
stage reached Inspiration Point, it stopped for a 



near Old Inspiration Point, and most of them dis- 
mounted and went out to the edge, to get the first 
and best view of the valley. The disgruntled man 
kept his seat, but finally yielded to the urging of 
the guide, to go out and see the fine view. When 
the whole stupendous sight broke open before him, 
he threw up his hands in mortal agony, exclaiming, 
"Great Heavens ! Have we got to cross that 
gulch ?" 

All the books tell the story of the young woman 
who looked down from Inspiration Point, and then 
expressed to her companions her wonder that they 
did not put lace curtains on the dining-room win- 
dows at Wawona. The whole story, however, I 




The Vai,i,ey from Inspiration Point. A Rare Picture 



few minutes, as is the custom. From this point 
travellers get the first and finest view of the valley, 
spread out at their feet. One man got out of the 
stage and took a snapshot, then, giving a casual 
glance to the most glorious view on this earth, he 
climbed back and inquired, "Now, driver, where is 
the Yosemite valley from here?" 

When John Muir was in the valley with the 
Sierra Club, he told another story along the same 
line which I have never heard before. In the early 
days, when there was only -a trail to the valley, he 
was coming in on horseback with a party of tourists 
and others. One man, in particular, was disgusted 
with the trip, and sis they surmounted one ridge after 
another, only to see more before them, he loudly pro- 
claimed his opinion of the maker of the trail, and 
all connected with it. Finally the party arrived 



have never seen in print. It happened a good many 
years ago, when the late Charles Francis Adams 
came into the valley with a party which included 
this young lady, who was amiable enough, but en- 
tirely uninfluenced by the grandeur of the moun- 
tains. In the end her trivial remarks jarred so 
much on the sensitive mind of the statesman, that 
he paid the Wawona Company one hundred dollars 
to be taken out of the valley in a private convey- 
ance, ahead of the rest of the party. He told them 
what the young lady had said at Inspiration Point, 
and the company unanimously voted to spend the 
hundred dollars which he paid them, for dining- 
room lace curtains. 

Consequent to the opening of the new Yosemite 
Valley railroad from Merced, the valley is greatly 
crowded this year. The Wawona Stage Company 



Pacific Outlook 



lit 



brings in about the same number that it has in past 
ti^. ami the railroad brings in three or four 
times Vs many more. The round trip, in by one 
route and oul by the other, has become a great 
favorite with the touri>t-, although at first they did 
not seem to appreciate its possibilities. 

Hotel accommodations in the valley arc severely 
taxed. The only hotel— the Sentinel — is nearly al- 
ways full, while the two camps, lamp Curry and 
Camp Yo>cmite. are jusl as crowded, although they 

have both greatly increased their capacity for this 

season. There are 111:111 \ wishes that Frank A. 
Miller's projected hotel were a reality of the pres- 
ent instead of the future: and indeed it is hard to 
see just how the travel will he accommodated in the 
two or more seasons that will pass by before the 
new hotel is ready. The camps can of course he ex- 
panded indefinitely, hut they will have to raise their 
standards before they will he entirely satisfact< iry. 
Many are bringing their own outfits and camping 
out. this year, and it is regrettable that more people 
do not choose this means. ( Hitfits can be rented in 
the valley, if desired; camping grounds are free to 
all: wood is to he had for hauling; while provisions 
can he either shipped in. or bought in the valley at 
reasonable rates. All the conditions are favorable; 
and it is really the only way to enjoy the Yosemite. 



While many wdio wish to enjoy an outing in the 
Yosemite will prefer to enter the valley by stage, 
the number who desire to take advantage of every 
possible comfort in traveling is increasing. For a 
long time the lack of a short, convenient route to 
this great scene has been keenly felt. Since the 
completion of the Yosemite Valiey railroad the 
number of visitors shows a great increase, espe- 
cially so far as women are concerned. There is no 
doubt that many women who have wanted to visit 
the valley have hesitated to make the trip on account 
of the hardships of a journey by stage. The open- 
ing of the railroad permits of the trip in fine ob- 
servation cars from Merced, Cal.. to El Portal, the ' 
terminus of the line, over a track as nearly dustless 
as it can be made. 

The road winds through the beautiful panoramic 
scenery of the Merced river canyon, paralleling this 
turbulent stream for nearly sixty miles, bringing 
into view during the rise of about four thousand 
feet a chain of beautiful waterfalls, rapids, cataracts 
and whirlpools. It is doubtful if anv other rail- 
road in the world affords a more sublime view of 
Nature at her best. 

* * * 

Good Selection 

The executive committee of the Voters' League 
has named as its representative on the committee 
proposed by the council to consider a new City 
Charter Warren H. Frost, president and manager 
of the Western Gas Engine Works. Mr. Frost ia 
eminently qualified for the undertaking. Ff his ad- 
vice be followed wfhen those provisions of the pro- 
posed charter regulating corporations are con 
sidered, it is safe to assume that tie just cause of 
e< implaint will arise. 

* * * 

Ella — I have seen twenty-two summer. Stella — 
I wish I were as near-sighted as you are. — fllus- 
trated Bits. 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at. Reduced 
Rates .... 

140 S. BROADWAY 

Main 19 Get. a City Map Free Home Ex. 19 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
S/WINGS/_BANK 




The building of a 
Bank Account is 
not difficult if the 
"builder" is persist- 
ent. 



This Bank is the medium through which over 20,000 
people are saving money. ^ Bear in mind that the German- 
American Savings Bank has the largest Capital and Surplus 
of any Savings Bank in Los Angeles. ^ Resources over 
$10,000,000. Four percent on deposits. 

(Strman-Ampriran ^atriitga Sank 

223 South Spring St.. Branch: Main and First. Sts. 



You Have a Mind 
of Your Own . . . 



When you once make up your mind that 
you want a certain article advertised in the 
PACIFIC OUTLOOK and you decide to 
buy it, do not be sidetracked by any "Just 
as Good" talk that may be given you. First 
class dealers give you what you ask for. 

The PACIFIC OUTLOOK accepts only 
the advertisements of reliable firms — buy of 
them and prove by your own experience 
that the article advertised is what the re- 
putable merchant claims. BUY ADVER- 
TISED GOODS— BUY OF THE ADVER- 
TISER. 



.0 



Pacific Outlook 



ShaRespearean Interpreter 

Miss Julia Ruggles of New York City gave a fine 
interpretation of "The Merchant of Venice" before 
one hundred well-known society women last Mon- 
dav afternoon at No. 2723 Menlo avenue, the home 
of her sister, whom she is visiting. Mrs. Randall 
Hutchinson, who is much interested in the success 
of the New York girl, assisted in receiving the 
guests. 

Miss Ruggles is the daughter of the late Henry 
J. Ruggles, the famous Shakespearan scholar, and 
brings to her interpretations a rare knowledge of 
the works of the greatest of dramatists. With her 
father, noted as a jurist as well as an author, she 
studied faithfully and even assisted in the prepara- 
tion of his two books, "The Method of Shake- 




on Fifth Avenue she has held many a juvenile au- 
dience spellbound. Her children's matinees, a new 
venture in the entertainment field, proved how great 
a demand there is for the work of an artist who can 
bring to the little men and women the classics in a 
form easily understood and quickly comprehended 
because of their dramatic presentation. With Rob- 
ert Bruce Pegram this resourceful American girl 
successfully gave a series of evenings with Shake- 
speare's songs. As an educator as -well as an enter- 
tainer she has found the broadest field. While Miss 
Ruggles is a visitor in Los Angeles, she may return 
to Southern California to find a permanent home. 






Miss Julta Ruggles 

speare as an Artist" and "The Plays of Shake- 
speare Founded on Literary Forms." 

Her reading last Monday delighted a most critical 
audience. As an interpreter she proved herself 
analytical, logical and poetic. Going beneath the 
dramatic superstructure she finds the ethical and 
spiritual foundations upon which have been built 
the poet's enduring fame. She has at her command 
originality and vivacity, as well as the enthusiasm 
which vivifies every sentence that she utters. She 
has, moreover, unusual charm of personality. In 
her reading she has attained the perfect art which 
conceals art. Her method is absolutely lacking in 
artificiality. 

In New York Miss Ruggles gained added fame 
by her storytelling for children. In the Waldorf- 
Astoria and in the ball rooms of the great mansions 



317-325 
So.Broadway 



314-322 
So. Hill Street 



A. PUSENOT CO. 



"THe Store Beautiful" 

OUR BIG 

Drapery Section 

Is receiving almost every day 



For the interior adornment of fine homes. The more 
exacting and extensive your knowledge of DRAP- 
ERIES and ORIENTAL RUGS the more you 'will 
appreciate the superior taste displayed in the selec- 
tion of our Exclusive Styles for Fall. 

Jtiast Recewed. 
\ai»!^ Blew Isa '. 



The design is entirely new, being made to match 
exactly the tiling of your bath room. In DELFT 
BLUE, PINK, CHERRY RED, DARK BLUE and 
DARK GREEN. Shown in 4 sizes. Priced as follows 
$1.50 $2.25 $3.00 $5.00 

SEE OUR FINE LINE OF ORIENTAL RUGS 
before purchasing. They are so reasonably priced. 



ARTS AND 


CRAFTS SHOP 


MRS. 


C. D, WESTON 


Hand Painted China 




Hammered Metals 


Home Phone E 334S 


Burnt and Modeled Leather 


34*7 S« Broadway 



Bl^nnmanaei" Isafealatoirituimm 

BULUNG'S METHOD OF MUNICH for the treatment of diseases of the 
air passages-CATARRH. BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. A visit to our lnhalatorium should be made bj all sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send forbooklet 

409 Pacific Electric Bldg'. Phone F-1674 



PARLOR MILLINERY. 



"311b 



Miss Lillie D. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter's 



Phone F 3I7S 



Pacific Outlook 



21 




Keception to Noted Suffragist 
The social event of next week will be the recep- 
tion Tuesday afternoon at the Woman's Club house 
in honor of Mrs. Rachel Foster Avery, first vice- 
president of the National Suffrage association. Mrs. 
Avery arrived in Los Angeles last Thursday from 
San Francisco and was received with an enthus- 
iasm that has given her much encouragement con- 
cerning California's chance of representation on the 
suffrage Hag which now has four stars. Mrs. Avery 
found the home of Madame Severance the center of 
general interest in the movement for the enfran- 
chisement of the women of the state. With the 
officers of the Political Equality Mrs. Avery has 
held a number of conferences and it is predicted 
that the result of her visit will be seen in the next 
campaign. Mrs. Avery is the guest of Mrs. Foster 
of No. 802 North Evergreen avenue. The absence 
in Kurope of Mrs. George Drake Ruddy, president 
of the Political Equality Club, is regretted, but Mrs. 
Julia D. Thelps, one of the most ardent of suffrag- 
es, will do the honors. 

In addition to Mrs. Phelps the following will be 
in the receiving line next Tuesday: Mrs. L. N. Rob- 
inson, Mrs. O. E. Farish. Mrs. C. A. Moody, Miss 
Frances Wills. Madame Caroline Severance, Mrs. 
M. A. Kinney, Mrs. Eliza Tupper Wilkes, Mrs. Lulu 
Pile Little, Mrs. T. S. Shinn. Mrs. E. Quinens, Mrs. 
Ada Longley of Pasadena, Mrs. Rebecca Spring and 
the officers of the County Suffrage league, the ward 
presidents and the officers of the W'estlake Political 
Equality club. 

Midsummer Wedding 

One of the quiet weddings of midsummer was 
celebrated Wednesday evening at No. 1597 Hobart 
boulevard. Miss Marian Porter, daughter of Mrs. 
L. G. Porter, and F. M. Grace were married in the 
presence of the relatives and intimate friends of the 
bride and bridegroom. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. Burt Estes Howard. The bride 
was attended by Miss Katherine Sawtelle and Miss 
Fayette Murray. Mr. and Mrs. Grace have many 
friends in Los Angeles who will welcome them on 
their return from a brief wedding trip. Mr. Grace 
is general superintendent of the Las Vegas and 
Tonopah railway and has many interests in Nevada. 
Mrs. Grace has been a favorite in Los Angeles so- 
ciety. 



Midsummer Tea and Dance 

Miss Eva Elizabeth Keating, No. 718 West 
Adams street, will be hostess at a midsummer tea 
and dance Saturday afternoon from four to half- 
past six o'clock to be given in honor of Miss Adeles 
Gray. Miss, Gray, wdio is a senior at Wellesley, has 
been passing her vacation in Los Angeles where 
she is a social favorite. The afternoon dance 
promises to be one of the most brilliant and most 
picturesque events of the season, as it will bring 
together the younger social set and will have some- 



thing of the character of a reunion of college stu- 
dents. Miss Keating's brother. A. ( 1. Keating, who 
is an Amherst man, is at home, and his friends, as 
well as Miss Keating's. will lie largely represented 
in the list of guests. The beautiful colonial home of 
Miss Keating's father and mother, Major and Mrs. 
Ff. M. Russell, with its fine garden is an ideal place 
for entertaining and it will serve as a charming set- 
ting for the assembly of debutantes, college girls 
and university students. Miss Keating will be as- 
sisted in receiving her guests by Mrs. William 
Bayley, Jr., Miss Edith Herron, Miss Gwendolen 
Laughlin, Miss Gertrude King, Miss Echo Allen, 
Miss Lois Allen. Miss Lucille Clark, Miss Inez 
Clark, Miss Mollie Adelia Brown and Miss Pearl 
Seeley. 



Wedding in Hollywood 

The wedding of Miss Alice Maud Andrews, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Andrews, and W. 
H. B. Kilner Monday evening was the social event 
of the week in Hollywood. The ceremony was per- 
formed in St. Stephen's Episcopal church. The 
chancel of the church was elaborately ornamented 
with asparagus plumosus, a canooy of the green 
being illuminated with hundreds of electric lights 
employed with beautiful effect. Mrs. Arthur Letts 
acted as matron of honor and Miss Elizabeth Gor- 
don was flower girl. The following served as brides- 
maids : Misses Edith Andrews, Jessie Andrews, Ada 
Letts, Edna Letts, Gladys Letts and Lila Weaver. 
They wore white chiffon over green silk, princess 
style, and carried bouquets of pink carnations. The 
best nian was W. A. Faris. The ushers were Arthur 
Letts, J. A. Aldritt, H. G. H. Philp, T. S. Milburn, 
G. D. Sisson and Arthur Letts, Jr. The bride wore 
a princess gown of lace, her veil being caught with 
orange blossoms. The matron of honor was attired 
in a rich costume of white satin. After the cere- 
mony a reception was held at the family residence, 
No. 215 North Sutherland avenue. The four hun- 
dred guests included many persons from distant 
cities. Special cars conveyed the Los Angeles 
euests to Hollvwood. 



Miss Estella Williamson and Miss Lillian Wil- 
liamson, No. 136 Magnolia avenue, entertained in- 
formally Monday afternoon in honor of Miss Maud 
Willis of New York City, who has been their house 
guest for a fortnight. Miss Willis is a dramatic 
reader whose unusual talents have been developed 
under the direction of Sargent and other leading 
instructors. 

Mrs. John F. Francis, No. 905 Bonnie Brae street, 
has returned from the Hotel Coronado. After a 
brief rest at home she will go to the Hotel Potter at 
Santa Barbara for several weeks. In the autumn 
Mrs. Francis will make a trip East. 

Miss Kate Robinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
E. G. Robinson, and Robert Bruce Wallace were 
married Thursday evening. The ceremony was 



22 



Pacific Outlook 



performed in Trinity Methodist church in the 
presence of a large assemblage of friends. Miss 
Eleanor Richards and Miss Louise Burton acted as 
bridesmaids. Little Olive Harris was flower girl. 
Lu :ius Green officiated as best man. After the 
ceremony a reception was held at the home of the 
bride's parents, No. 933 South Union avenue. 

Miss Maybelle Rendell, No. 905 South Alvarado 
street, has returned from Portland, Oregon. Miss 
Rendell started for Europe three months ago with 
Miss Fanny Brown of Portland, but the death of 
Miss Brown's father, just before the date of sailing, 
cause her to return to Oregon with her friend. 

Miss Bessie Belle Thew and A. F. Miller will be 
married Saturday. Miss Thew, who is correspond- 
ing secretary of the Southern California Woman's 
Press Club, is well known as a dramatic reader and 
the writer of clever monologues. Mr. and Mrs. 
Miller will make their home in Los Angeles. 

Miss May Sutton of Pasadena sailed from Liver- 
pool last Wednesday. Miss Sutton comes home 
laden with new honors. She has regained the Brit- 
ish championship and successfully defended Lhe 
Welsh title. She has not been defeated in any im- 
portant match this season. 

Members of the Galpin Shakespeare Club enjoyed 
a reading and lecture Wednesay afternoon at Cum- 
nock Hall, when Mrs. Charles P. Funck of Burling- 
ton, Iowa, appeared for the first- time in Los An- 
geles. Mrs. Funck chose as her subject "Shake- 
speare in Music". 

Mr. and Mrs. Vere Goldthwaite left Los Angeles 
last week for New York, whence they will sail for 
Liverpool. Their trip to England will be a short 
one as Mrs. Goldthwaite (Ellen Beach Yaw) has 
made engagements for an extensive concert tour. 

Miss Mary McCarthy, daughter of Mrs.' D. F. 
McCarthy, has returned from long visits in Atlanta, 
Ga., Washington, D. C, and New York. She is at 
the Laurie. No. 1233 Elden avenue. 

Announcement is made of the engagement of 
Miss Ethel Mullins, daughter of Captain and Mrs. 
George G. Mullins of No. 2407 Juliet street, to 
Llewellyn Arthur Nares of Fresno. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Patton, Miss Anita Patton 
and George Patton, Jr., who are occupying one of 
the most attractive cottages at Catalina, entertain 
many visitors every week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam T. Clover and family are com- 
fortably established in camp in one of the pretty 
gulches of the San Gabriel canyon. They will pass 
a month in the mountains. 

Mrs. Victor E. Shaw and Miss Alice Shaw are 
passing the month of 'August at the Hotel Coron- 
ado. Judge Shaw will enjoy week-end vacations at 
the beautiful resort. 

Dr. George Barrie, a cousin of J. M. Barrie, the 
author, was a guest at the Hotel Alexandria this 
week. Dr. Barrie practices medicine in Washing- 
ton, D. C. ' 

Mrs. Oliver P. Posey has gone, to New York. She 
expects to remain/ in the East for several months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Carhart have returned 
from an automobile trip to Santa Barbara. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hancock Banning entertained a 
week-end house party at El Descanso, Catalina, 
composed of members of the younger social set. 



SUMMER FICTION 



During vacation time "Something to read" is an 
absolute essential — you wouldn't be happy without it. 



The writers of snappy romance for summer con- 
sumption have been especially good to you this 
season. Dozens of the light fiction works here to 
choose from — just enough mental exercise in them 
for vacation time — brimfull of the elements you de- 
mand during your yearly relaxation. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

252 S. SPRING ST. 
The Big Book Store Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 



* 


J^iP 






± 


9 


?31 






III 




Drag 

it 


on 


Trade Mark 


II 



Sing Fat Co., inc. 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-ig South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 1121 POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



Los Angeles 



OstricH Farm 



Opposite 

EAST LAFLE PARR 

5c Car Fare on City Cars 

City Salesroom 
324 S. Broadway 

Most Beautiful Feather Display Ever Made 

in Los Angeles 

Manufacturers' Prices 

We Repair, Redye and Recurl 

5 Acres of Gigantic 
—Birds 





Visitors are Cordially Invited 

AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 



Beauty in Natural Hair ' 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Pl?ce 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



The [ er Sunday included Miss (Catherine 

Melius. Miss Lois Allen. Ed. Robinson, Volney 
Howard, Charles Seyler, Jr. and Neil Brown. 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Letts and tluir daughters 

have returned to their Hollywood home alter an 

absence of a month at Lake Tahoe. 

Miss Mary Phelps, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 1. 
W. Phelps, and Bert Lester will he married at high 
noon Wednesday. August 14. 

Louis F. Vetter has returned from the midsum- 
mer high jinks of the San Francisco Bohemian 
Club at Sonoma. 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Chick started Thursday 
tor Minneapolis for a six weeks' visit. 

Mrs. Arturo Bandini and her son. Ralph Bandini, 
are enjoying the summer at Catalina. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Alles, No. 1252 W'estlake 
avenue, are at Laguna Beach. . 

Mr. and Mrs. ( tliver P. 1'osey. Jr.. are at the 
Hotel Metropole. Catalina. 

* * * 
The Fichle Public 

The recent visit of the President's daughter in 
San Francisco raises the question whether the 
American public is not the most fickle in the world. 
Less than two years ago Alice Roosevelt occupied 
much more than her share of space in the news- 
papers. Since her marriage she has ceased to be a 
figure of mpre than ordinary interest. The societv 
journals have commented on this fact and now a 
writer for the San Francisco "Town Talk" fur- 
nishes the following: 

"Alice in Wonderland did not have a more amaz- 
ing experience than Alice in San Francisco. The 
Longworths have been mobbed in about every city 
in the Union, and Princess Alice probably expected 
armed policemen to clear the way for them to take 
passage on the Siberia. But throughout their visit, 
San Francisco, aside from the great flurry made in 
Mrs. Eleanor Martin's circle, went its accustomed 
way serenely indifferent to the presence of near- 
royalty. There were no curious people thronging 
the Fairmont Hotel for a glimpse of the President's, 
daughter; her appearance on the streets did not 
corner the 'rubber' market ; and their progress to 
the Siberia was certainly unmarked by any of the 
demonstrations which usually beset their path. So- 
ciety having lunched and dined with the Long- 
worths the day before and having exchanged ver- 
bal bouquets, did not call upon the florists to audit 
accounts. The leaders of the local aristocracy too 
were singularly lax in the matter of posies. Not a 
single bunch of flowers scented the departure of the 
Honorable Nicholas and his bride. Their exit from 
the hotel was not elbowed through an eager multi- 
tude waving farewell. There was absolutely no one 
to speed the parting guests save a bell boy who in- 
sisted on informing a deaf man lounging in the 
foyer 'there goes the Princess Alice'. Had it not 
been for the obtuseness of his tympanum, probablv 
the rest of the people sitting around the foyer would 
not even have known that the Longworths were 
taking their departure. There was no curious throng- 
gathered at the steamer to remind them of the mul- 
titude that blocked their way when last they set 
sail for the beckoning Orient. The Longworths 
have been dodging the public since they left Wash- 
ington but it looks as though the public dodged 
with equal agility in San Francisco." 



Our Golden Crop 

The orange crop this year in California has beet! 
remarkable. In the Redlands district 40X2 cars 

have been shipped, on which the returns have been 
approximately two million and a half dollars. The 
shipment from Riverside, up to July 30. was 5228 
cars, on which the returns were two million six 
hundred thousand dollars. 



Special Rate toYosemite 

— DURING AUGUST = 

ROUND $ -| 2.00 ^ Wl P 

$12.00 From Merced. Cal. $12.00 

via 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 

During August io-day round trip tickets from Mer- 
ced, Cal., to the Hotel and Camps in Yosemite, via 
the Yosemite Valley Railroad, will cost you only 
$12.00, about one-third the stage fare of past years. 
A quick, comfortable trip of unequalled scenic beau- 
ty, through the picturesque Merced River Canyon. 
Th snowclad peaks, majestic waterfalls and waving 
pine forests of Wonderland await you. Fine trout 
fishing in the Canyon and Valley. Daily train from 
Merced at 2:30 p. m. 

See H. H. Vincent, 553 So. Spring St., Los Angeles, 

Or write O. W. Lehmer, Traffic Manager, 

Merced, Cal. 



r 



Established 188? 



m 



onradi 



Just received a new line of solid 
silvei -ware for the table; a great 
-variety of exclusive designs in 
tea sets, salad bowls, etc. 

Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C. H. Heard 

S. CONR.ADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles, Cal. 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 



MACMNALD'S HAMMING COLLEGE Wantcd ~ 

' Women 

Students 




MacDonald. 204 Mercantile Place 

Los Angeles, Cal. Upstairs near Spring St. 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



UNDER THE SKYLIGHTS 



Painter of the Naval Highway 

Charles Henry Grant, an eastern artist who has 
come to the coast to paint the blue Pacific, this 
week exhibited seven canvases in the gallery at No. 
336^ South Broadway. Following John Dono- 
van's pictures, which hung in the gallery for a fort- 
night, these marines painted on the Atlantic coast 
invite comparison wtith the work of the California 
painter. It is interesting to notice how different in 
technique and in point of view are these two sin- 
cere artists. 

Mr. Grant has chosen for his large canvases the 
sea as it appears as the highway or the battlefield 
for the big vessels of modern commerce and war- 
fare. He has striven to present the giant cruisers 
and big liners instead of the white-sailed ships that 
have been the delight of poets and artists for gen- 
erations. While he has attained in most cases a 
certain success, one turns away from the giant ves- 
sels to admire the "Sunlit Sea" and "Outward 
Bound", less ambitious works that have in them 
more of beauty and feeling than the larger pictures. 

The seven pictures show a diversity of mood in 
sky and sea. All prove the artist to be a colorist of 
fine feeling. The "Breezy Day" will find favor with 
most lovers of art. It is strong in composition and 
beautifully painted. Here one feels the wind blow- 
ing and sees the motion of the restless waves. It 
brings the realization of breadth and space. A 
schooner with sails filled moves over the waters 
upon which the foam rises. 

All the marines have atmosphere, freshness of 
treatment, vigor and individuality. 



Art Notes 

Miss Octavia Holden this week closed her book 
binding studio in Los Angeles. She is now in Santa 
Barbara enjoying a' rest before she goes on to her 
old home in San Francisco, where she will again 
take her place among the art workers of the north- 
ern city. Miss Holden, who has made a national 
reputation by her work, will be missed from Los 
Angeles, which welcomed her cordially when she 
came south after the earthquake and fire in which' 



she lost all her possessions, including many rare 
and beautiful books. She has been most success- 
ful in her achievements since she bravely started 
anew and now she returns to the old field with the 
good wishes of scores of friends. 

Miss Jessie Washburn is sketching at Switzer's 
camp, Arroyo Seco canyon. 

Antony Anderson, the art critic, passed part of 
his vacation at Laguna Beach. 

* * * 
Goldfield's Practical JoKe 

Frank T. Searight, upon whom devolves the re- 
sponsibility of preparing for the reception and en- 
tertainment of the delegates to the annual conven- 
tion of American press humorists which assembles 
in Los Angeles September 15, returned this week 
from a trip to Goldfield. It has been Mr. Searight's 
desire that his fellow newspaper jesters should be 
able to vis^t Nevada. With the idea that the thriv- 
ing camps would be glad to extend much coveted, 
invitations he visited several of them. Goldfield 
gave not only an invitation but without delay start- 
ed a fund for the purpose of defraying all expenses 
of the guests from the time they leave Los Angeles. 
With startling rapidity $2,000 was subscribed and 
it is said that $3,000 more is promised. If the 
humorists find material for a few jokes that show 
how easy it is to make a fortune in Nevada, the 
citizens will soon have the worth of their money 
in advertising. Moreover, if the residents of Gold- 
field do inspire a fresh brand of humor they will be' 
public benefactors. 

* * * 
Women's W^orK at Home 

It was a prosperous, middle-aged man who de- 
clared at a dinner party, the other evening, that he 
had no objection to any work, professional, artistic 
or commercial, which a woman can do at home. 
The woman editor listened while the man told 
with what reluctance he left his own house each 
morning for his stuffy office. 

* * * 
She "Did" Him 

"She did a very foolish thing when she married." 
"Why, he was rich, wasn't he?" "Yes — he was^the 
foolish thing." — Cleveland Leader. 



The Reynolds Brothers' 



Thoroughly 
Patented 



Wave Motor SSSU 



Based on Correct "Principles and Sound Philosophy 




CALIFORNIA WAVE MOTOR CO. 



A complete unit system of wave 
power production, equalization and 
transmission. Backed by conservative 
business judgment and planned by in- 
telligent mechanics. Utilizes the hori- 
zontal motion of the ocean waves, the 
greater force of the ocean's energy. 
One of the great things that is com- 
ing that can scarcely be spoken of in 
figures. Solves the question of light, 
heat and power without the use of 
fuel of any kind. Use good judgment 
and buy stock in it now, while it is 
young. Grow up with it and become 
a member of the richest corporation 
in the world. 

312 South Broadway 



Pacific Outlook 



25 




Amusement Notes 
A number of well known theatrical folk were 
guests at a pretty wedding last Monday morning at 
the Hotel Angelus. Miss Marie Fredericks Kiefer 
and George Clayton Bowman, known on the stage 
as William J. Bowman, were married in the pres- 
ence of a few intimate friends, the Rev. W. C. Bow- 
man, father of the bridegroom, performing the cere- 
mony. The bride, wdio is a daughter of Mrs. Emma 
S. Kiefer of Cincinnati and niece of J. D. Schimd- 
lap, president of a bank in the Ohio city, came to 
California to be married in order that her future 
father-in-law might officiate. Miss Gladys Kiefer, 
sister of the bride, was maid of honor, and T. Daniel 
Frawley of the Burbank theater was best man. An 
elaborate wedding breakfast was served in the red 
asparagus plumosus and' pink sweet peas. Among 
the guests were T. Daniel Frawley, Mr. and Mrs. 
Oliver Morosco, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morris, Mr. 
and Mrs. James Neill, Mr. and Mrs. P. Bnrdell Mil- 
ler, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gardiner, Mr. and Mrs. 
Cloudesley Johns, Miss Merla Metcalf, Mrs. M. B. 
Clark, Miss Gladys Kiefer and Mrs. E. S. Kiefer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bowman will sail August 15 for Aus- 
tralia. On their return they will go to Seattle, 
where Mr. Bowman will act as stage director at 
one of the theaters. 

Richard Mansfield's condition is now acknowl- 
edged to be critical. His health has been failing 
for a number of years, a fact that may explain the 
irritability and eccentricity that have given his 
press agents material for many stories. By hard 
work Mr. Mansfield has gained the foremost place 
in his profession. The fact that he may never again 
appear on the stage will be lamented by every lover 
of dramatic art. A master of technique, possessor 
of a splendid intelligence and a remarkable per- 
sonality, he has achieved a lasting fame, but when 
his powers come to a final analysis it is likely that 
he will pass into history as a character actor, for 
he has not surpassed in characterizations that de- 
mand the poetic and romantic temperament. 

"The Little Minister" is the offering this week 
at the Burbank. Miss Hall's Babbie has been 
counted one of her best roles and she is responsible 
for the success of the play in which Mr. Frawley 
makes a good impression as Gavin Dishart. Miss 
Gilbert as Felice and Harry Mestayer as Halliwell 
add much to the supporting strength of the com- 
pany. 

Richard Vivian returned to Los Angeles this 
week after a vacation passed at the home of Mrs. 
Vivian's parents in Cincinnati. Mr. Vivian dis- 
covered that Ohio is not the sort of a summer reser- 
vation that a Californian can enjoy. 

Ezra Kendall in "Swell Elegant Jones" at the 
Mason provided main a heart laugh this week. 



This veteran actor has a place especially his own 
upon the stage. It does not matter what sort of a 
play he chooses as a medium ; it is Ezra Kendall 
who proves to be the attraction. Gifted with a re- 
markable personality, this comedian survives the 
changes in fashion and in taste. As long as he lives 
he will make a peculiar appeal to the human heart. 
George Ade is now finishing a play which he will 
use next season. 

James Neill and Edythe Chapman Neill were the 
star attractions at the Orpheum this week. Their 
playlet, "The Lady Across the Hall," is an accept- 
able vehicle for the talents of the actor and actress 
who are favorites with Los Angeles audiences. 
Mrs. Neill has won a place among the players of 
more than usual claim to high recognition, and it 
is hoped that she will come to Los Angeles next 
time in a role that gives her greater opportunities. 

At the Belasco this week the revival of "The 
Charity Ball" is noteworthy for the beautiful inter- 
pretation of the part of Mrs. De Puyster by Miss 
Adele Farrington, an artist whose work each week 




A PROPOSITION 



t Mhm 



JJiaiui 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN <©, CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St.. 




Office Phone: Jt JOSI 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

35S South Hill Street 
Residence Phone: £ 2727 



26 



Pacific Outlook 



carrier new assurance of her splendid powers. 
Hobart Bosworth as John Van Buren, the rector, is 
as usual the polished technician. Miss Albertson, 
who makes her farewell appearance in the role of 
Ann Cruger, leaves a delightful memory. 

Miss Lillian Albertson and Miss Marion Berg 
will go East next ■week and patrons of the Belasco 
will miss- two young women who have wona last- 
ing place in public esteem. 

Miss Blanche Stoddard, who will succeed Miss 
Lillian Albertson as leading woman at the Belasco 
Theater, arrived in Los Angeles last Monday. She 
is at the Van Nuys. 

Dick Ferris will close his engagement in Minnea- 
polis August 26. He will pass the first two weeks 
of September in New York and then come to the 
coast. 

Mrs. Patrick Campbell will play an engagement 
in California next winter. She will probably come 
to Los Angeles in December. 

* * * 

.A Natural Query 

Gregory Perkins, Jr., enjoys the greatest popu- 
larity among the society folk of Los Angeles, and 
when it was known that he was in a street car acci- 
dent, a fortnight ago, maids and matrons expressed 
the most sincere concern. The proneness of human 
nature to believe the worst, however, was demon- 
strated at an afternoon tea when a fluffy girl said 
to a dignified dame: 

"Did you hear what happened to Mr. Perkins? 
Just think of it ! He was thrown off one of the 
Santa. Monica cars." 

The dignified matron stopped just as she was 
putting the second lump of sugar into a Sevres cup 
and wiith raised eyebrows replied : 

"How shocking ! I supposed he was quite above 
reproach. Who threw him off — the conductor or a 
policeman?" 

9 * * 

Bryan on Public Ownership 

William Jennings Bryan pretends that he is care- 
fully guarding a little surprise for the voters of the 
United States. It is announced from Omaha that 
he will formally declare himself a candidate for 
President of the United States at the dinner to be 
given in Lincoln, early in the autumn, to the lead- 
ing Democrats of the country. Since Mr. 'Bryan's 
first campaign he has never been anything but an 
aspirant for the highest office in the government 
service. He appears to be willing to espouse any 
popular cause or to sacrifice any principle that is 
likely to affect his chances. In the last issue of the 
Commoner, under the caption "Government Owner- 
ship Not an Issue," is the following: 

"As the campaign approaches it becomes more 
and more evident that of the economic questions, 
three, the trust question, the tariff question and the 
railroad question, will share public attention and 
these three really present the same issue between 
the general public and the privilged classes ; shall 
the government be administered in the interests of 
the whole people or in the interest of a few? This is 
the issue presented by the trust question, the tariff 
question and the railroad quesion. 

"Government ownership is not an immediate is- 
sue. A large majority of- the people still hope for 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 
kind worn by stylish dressers. Call and see for 
yourself. 





BETWEEN 



..California £ East.. 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 



'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Full Particulars at 601 South Spring St. 



Books Bought 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN IS55 



Pacific Outlook 



27 



rive regulation, and while they so hope they 
will not consider ownership. While many Demo- 
crats believe, and Mr. Bryan is one of the number, 
that public ownership offers the ultimate solution 
. f the problem, still those who believe that the pub- 
lic will finally in self-defence be driven to owner- 
ship recognize that regulation must be tried under 
the most favorable circumstances before the masses 
will be ready to try a mure radical remedy. 

"Regulation cannot be sufficiently tried within 
the next year, and there is no desire anywhere to 
make government ownership an issue in [908. Mr. 
Bryan fully agrees with those who believe that it 
would be unwise to turn attention from regulation, 
on which the people are ready to act. to government 
ownership, upon which the people are not ready to 
act. To inject the government ownership question 
into the next campaign would simply give repre- 
sentatives of the railroads a chance to dodge the is- 
sue of regulation and deceive the public. 

"So far the railroads have been successful in pre- 
venting effective federal regulation, and state regu- 
lation has as a rule been restrained by the United 
States courts. It is about twenty years since the 
Interstate Commerce Commission was created. It 
required about ten years for the courts to find out 
that the powers conferred were insufficient and then 
it took about ten years to secure an amendment. 

"The railroads fought the amendment at every r 
step and, with the help of railroad Republicans in 
the Senate, even then the amendment, secured after 
a tremendous effort, falls short of wdiat it should be. 
It aims to stop rebates and passes and the railroads 
profit pecuniarily by both the stoppage of rebates 
and the prohibition of passes, but extortionate rates 
still exist, and state legislation for the reduction of 
rates has resulted in an agitation which will deprive 
the state of authority and centralize all regulation 
in Congress. 

"The Democratic party must meet the issue pre- 
sented. It must resist the encroachments upon the 
authority of the states. It must insist upon the ex- 
ercise of federal power for the regulation of inter- 
state commerce and it must insist upon the exercise 
of state authority for the exercise of all of the 
power vested in the state. 

"This question has grown in importance during 
the past year and its prominence will be increased 
if anv attempt is made to impair state authority. 
The Republican party is as impotent to regulate the 
railroads as it is to exterminate the trusts and to re- 
form the tariff. 

"The Democratic party has in three national cam- 



paign^ demanded effective railroad regulation, while 
the Republican national platforms have been silent 
upon the subject. The President has partially 
adopted the Democratic view on tins subject, but 
far the Republican leaders have resolutely op- 
posed it. The President is helping to educate the 

people up to the need of railroad regulation, but his 
parly, under its present leadership, is powerless to 
accomplish this or any other important reform. 

"If the Democratic party will clearly and un- 
equivocally demand, first, the ascertaining of the 
value of all the railroads; second, the preventing of 
overcapitalization; then, third, the reduction of 
rates to a point where they will yield only a reason- 
able return upon the real value of the roads — if the 
party will do this it will commend itself not only to 
Democrats but to those Republicans who have been 
led to study the railroad question. 

"The railroad situation presents a vital issue, and 
the issue should be so stated that every one can un- 
derstand the party's position. While Democrats 
may differ as to the relative importance of the trust 
question, the tariff question and the railroad ques- 
tion, all must agree that the party must take the 
side of the common people on all three questions. 
Let the line be drawn between those who want to 
make this a government of the people, by the peo- 
ple and for the people, and those who want it to be 
a government of the corporations, by the corpora- 
tions and for the corporations." 

* * * 

No Cup Race This Year 

It has been officially announced that the Vander- 
bilt Cup race is off. There has been a feeling among 
automobile men that there would be a cup race 
somewhere, but the ones that have been in closest 
touch have been of the opinion that 1907 would see 
no cup race. Manufacturers do not go to the ex- 
pense of building race cars unless they know for 
what they are doing it and the race seemed to be so 
much in doubt that at this late date there was 
nothing to do but to call it off. It is to be hoped 
that the Long Island Motor Car Parkway will be in 
such shape that the International Race can be held 



there in 1908. 






RULE «Sr SONS 




CO. 


REAL ESTATE— MINES 
GENERAL INSURANCE 






Suite 323, Pacific Electric BIdg. 


Home Ex. 601 
Main 8535 




Studebaker Junior 



The children's delight. Get one for the 
little folks. Fitted with both pole and 
shafts. 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 



Studebaker Agency 



Wagons 



Carriage 



Implements 



200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. 
Los Angeles jt Jt California 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



NOT A PLEASANT JOB 



How the New Mexico Politician-Grafters "Worry THeir Governor 



The lines of the new Governor of the Territory 
of New Mexico, Captain George Curry, have not 
fallen in pleasant places, much as he enjoys a good 
stiff fight. He has been called upon to clean out 
the worst nest of grafters, thieves and political 
shysters that ever brought disgrace upon a state 
or territory. 

A radical change in political conditions in that 
territory took place at the beginning of the year 
1906, when Herbert J. Hagerman was inaugurated 
governor. For many years the administration of 
public affairs had been characterized by a deplora- 
ble indifference to the interests of the people and a 
most diaphanous subservience, in nearly all de- 
partments of the government, to special interests. 
Vast areas of timber, grazing and agricultural lands 
were disposed of to these special interests in a man- 
ner which brought forth wholesale condemnation 
from those citizens not identified with the corrupt 
political ring which had the territor" b" the throat. 
Great corporations were permitted to obtain, for 
an inconsenuential sum of money, title to tracts of 
land of great value. Lands which, if sold at auc- 
tion to the highest bidder after advertisement, 
wpuld have added millons of dollars to the terri- 
torial treasury, were sold at the lowest possible 
price allowable by law to corporations and asso- 
ciations of individuals. 

It is notorious in New Mexico that Governor 
Otero, the predecessor of Governor Hagerman ; 
"Bull" Andrews, the Republican delegate to Con- 
gress ; Henry O. Bursum, the Socorro county boss 
and superintendent of the penitentiary under Gov- 
ernor Otero ; Granville Pendleton, the member of 
the ring from San Juan county ; Max Frost, editor 
of the New Mexican, the Santa Fe daily paper 
which is the recognized organ of the ring ; Solomon 
• Luna, the boss of Valencia county ; and two or 
three others formed the clique which absolutely 
dominated affairs in the territory for years. Albu- 
querque, the metropolis of the territory, was the spe- 
cial interest of the Hubbell brother, Frank A. and 
Thomas S., half-breed Mexicans, astute manipula- 
tors who have since been completely discredited in 
their home town. 

At the beginning of the administration of Gov- 
ernor Hagerman, who had been appointed by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt with definite, instructions to turn a 
cleansing current into the Augean stables of New 
Mexico politics, resignations of public officials hold- 
ing office under appointment of his predecessor fol- 
lowed in rapid succession. Hardly had the new ex- 
ecutive taken possession when a wave of apprehen- 
sion passed over the entire body of appointive 
officials. In one case, that of Elfego Baca of Socorro, 
a Mexican holding an appointment under Governoi 
Otero, a resignation reached the governor by tele- 
graph. By the end of the first five months of the 
Hagerman administration the new regime was well 
installed and the work of reform was in full sway. 

Among the early acts of the new executive was 
the cleaning out of the nest of public land thieves, 
in which he was assisted by federal authorities. It 
was not long after the institution of the new order 



of things that the combination of politicians re- 
ferred to and the special interests which had been 
nurtured at the expense of a hitherto helpless public 
began insidiously and by devious methods to plot 
for Hagerman's downfall. The most difficult thing 
which Hagerman had to do was to straighten out 
the crookedness in public land matters. Much of 
the territorial land had been donated by the federal 
government to the territory, the officials of which, 
during the Otero administration, had given it away 
to favorites. The territorial legislature had passed 
laws governing the disposition of these lands di- 
rectly contrary to the provisions of the federal 
enactments. Governor Hagerman recognized the 
fact that Congress was superior to the territorial 
legislature and hence he refused to permit of the 
"sale" of any more public land contrary to the pro- 
visions of the federal laws. One of his first official 
acts was to lay a plain statement of the situation 
before the Secretary of the Interior, upon whose 
recommendation Congress took the matter up and 
amended the original law so that not more than one 
section of land should be leased to one person, cor- • 
poration of association of individuals. Under the 
former law there was practically no limit to the 
amount of land that might be leased for an inde- 
finite period, the result being that about all the good 
land in the territory was in possession of a few 
men. 

Governor Hagerman made the stiffest fight 
against graft and grafters which any executive of 
modern times, in any state or territory, has made. 
He followed the instructions of the President, ex- 
cept that in all probability he did not resort to the 
extremes which wiould have been adopted by Roose- 
velt himself had the latter been in Hagerman's 
position. The cry was raised by the Republicans- 
for-revenue that the young Governor was disrupt- 
ing the party in New Mexico. So he was : but in 
so doing he was bringing about the downfall of the 
most unconscionable gang of thieves and grafters 
which have ever had a state or territory at their 
mercy. Appeal after appeal was made to Washing- 
ton. Twice the young governor — but thirty-four 
years of age — was summoned to the White House 
to explain the terrible charg-es against him — the ac- 
cusation that he was making possible a Democratic 
majority in New Mexico, though the charge was 
heavily veiled, and that he was preventing the 
spoilsmen from exercising: a free hand in robbing 
the territory. What representations were finally 
made to the President may never be known, but the 
latter finally felt that he was doing his duty in 
asking for the resignation of Governor Hagerman 
in order that he might place in authority a man 
who would kill off the grafters without killing off 
the party. 

This is the task allotted to George Curry, the 
new governor. Curry has always been a fighter. 
In his early days he was mixed up in one or two 
scrapes growing out of the effort to punish some of 
the " bad" men" who made life a burden to the in- 
habitants of the northern part of the territory. He 
served for some time as sheriff of Lincoln county, 



Pacific Outlook 



2:1 



where he made an excellent record. He is a Demo- 
crat, but a strong Roosevelt man. ami it is not likely 
that he will show any ii)i>re consideration fur the 
Andrews-Frost-Bursum gang in New Mexico than 
(lid his predecessor during liis brief administration. 
IK- will aim at the same tiling, but will probably 
try t«> succeed through different methods. He has a 
mighty job in hand. And it is a good thing for 
New Mexico that his political affiliations in the past 
have been with the Democratic party, for he can 
proceed against the Republican gangsters without 
being placed in a position where an appeal ma\ be 
made to him. with good grace, not to break up the 
Grand ( 'Id Tarty. 

It is not likely that Captain Curry would have 
chosen the office he has consented to occupy at the 
request of the President. It is inconceivable that 
any sane man would select the executive chair at 
Santa Fe as the most desirable public office within 
the gift of the President. But if Governor Curry 
still loves a good fight, with an enemy that will 
take advantage of every trick known to political 
warfare, he has before him a magnificent oppor- 
tunity to distinguish himself. He can find plenty 
of fighting to do, every hour of the day and every 
day of his administration, for the outfit which suc- 
ceeded in inducing the President to turn out so 
good a man as Hagerman will exert every effort to 
get rid of Curry. So long as there remains in New 
Mexico anything worthy of exploitation, in mine, 
forest or field, the Frosts and the Andrewses and 
the Bursums, if permitted to roam at large, will 
make life miserable for the man who interferes in 
any wise with their plans. 

* * * 

What Churches Might Do 

The following from Municipal Affairs, the month- 
ly publication of the Municipal League, deserves 
widespread circulation : 

"Municipal Affairs has several times asserted, and 
we have recently witnessed a demonstration of the 
exact truth of the assertion, that if the churches of 
this city chose to exercise the tremendous powe - 
that lies almost dormant in their membership and • 
organization, there is nothing in the world that is 
right and reasonable to be done that they could net 
accomplish. Do the church people of this city de- 
sire the liquor traffic properly regulated? They cat; 
do it. Do they wish prize-fighting stopped? It is 
within their power to pass the ordinance that vill 
do the work. Do they want a bad man removed 
from council? In every ward in the city, except 
perhaps in the Eighth, this can be accomplished. 

"How can these things be done? Well, not by- 
prayer and faith alone unhappily, or the wholo 
world would have been beautifully made over long 
ere this. It is easier, no doubt, simply to cali on 
the Almighty to make thing's better than it is to get 
out and do some of the work oneself, but it se< ms 
to be a well recognized principle now, even anuug 
the very devout, that the Almighty expects the sup- 
pliant to put forth a reasonable amount of effort as 
a guarantee of good faith. 

"The strength of the church in matters of tats 
kind lies in its numbers, its organization, and in Lne 
enthusiasm and sincerity of its peonle. These forces 
are available for issues of morality, and fortunate 1^ 
the community where thev know their power and 



use it with intelligence. Too often the entire 
strength i^ wasted in impractical, wholesale efforts 
at making over human nature. Sometimes the ex- 
tremists in control actuallv bring the church forces 
into alliance with the very worst element of the 
city, as, for example, the phenomenon frequently 
witnessed in American cities where the Prohibition- 
ists have joined with saloon men to fight against 
high license because high license recognizes and 
accepts the liquor traffic. 

"( )f late years, however, the same reasonable 
men of the churches who recognize the value of half 



'>eac]hi 



Facing 
the 
Park 
and 

Close 
to 

Ocean 



Hotel Savoy 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

Everything New 

No. 142-144 Pacific Avenue 
Long Beach, Cal. 



Rooms 
Single 

or 
en Suite 

Home 
Phone 
1743 



♦♦Shoups Place.. 

FOR REGULAR MEALS 

J 44 Pacific Avenue 
Opposite Park • Long Beach, Cal. 



Home Phone 1 183 Sunaet 3443 

ft Ofiel Yale (European) 

Cdrner First and Pacific Ave, 

and "SURF VIEW" on the strand. New Housekeeping Apartments 

N. M, WORMLEY, Prop. 

THE PACIFIC DELICATESSEN 

MEALS A LA CARTE and DELICACIES SOLD 

Home Made Pies. Cakes, Rolls and Ginger Bread, "Like mother used to make" 

Home Phone 1073 

114 PACIFIC AVE. Opposite ParK 



QWf ^ (Ugntlf ta anft Annex 



Leading Apartment House in Long Beach 

Opposite Jtuditorium — Pleasure Pier — P. E. 
Depot and Fronting the Ocean 

Single rooms and 2, 3 and 4 room suites. Every suite has 
private bath. Home 24. P. O. Box 214. 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



a loaf as contrasted with no bread at all, have taken 
command of the forces, and results are beginning 
to show in the saloon regulation campaigns that are 
in progress all over the country ; also in the meas- 
ures for the protection of children against im- 
niorality. 

"The churches of this city are joined in a Federa- 
tion that has shown itself to be a most important 
and valuable factor in the struggle for civic better- 
ment. The attorney, Mr. Nathan Newby, and the 
officers who are active in the work are all men of 
the same practical order, who understand the value 
of small results as contributing toward ultimate 
larger success. They are coming to understand, 
moreover, the force and value of the church as a 
local institution, and its possible bearing on a coun- 
cilman, w;ho is also, in tiie last analysis, a local 
institution. 

"One reason why the position of the church in 
matters of civic morality is changing for the better 
is that the preachers are changing- from the old- 
fashioned doctrinal variety, who were strolls' on free 
will, predestination, foreign missions, justification, 
the trinity, plenary inspiration, etc., to the plain 
every-day human sort, who are not too learned nor 
too dreamy to pay attention to the humble affairs 
of the world in which we live. Some of the younger 
. men are waking up to the possibilities of the church 
as a neighborhood center. The local improvement 
association meets there, and even discusses street 
paving and tree planting and the minister — mirabile 
dictu ! — takes an interest in the proceedings. Occa- 
sionally when some issue of a moral sort arises in 
local affairs, he refers to it in his sermon and urges 
his people to interest themselves in the matter. 
And when the issue is one of vital importance, he 
joins with other pastors in a call upon the church- 
going people of the city to bring influence to bear 
on their councilman, to stand for what is right. 

"There are 130 churches in this city, averaging 
over 100 voters to the church, or a total of over 
13,000 voters, perhaps 15,000, or over one in three 
of the voting strength of the city. These are, more- 
over, men of influence who can accomplish great 
results in shaping public opinion. It may be safely 
affirmed that the church people of this city can do 
whatever they wish, in or with the city government. 
The only questions are, how thoroughly are the)' 
in earnest, and will they use good judgment in what 
they undertake?" 

* * * 

Jamestown's Hard LucR 

The Jamestown Exposition has been receiving a 
good deal of attention from the Secretary of the 
Treasury. There is no evidence that Mr. Cortelyou 
has actually lost any sleep, writes the Washington 
correspondent of the Argonaut, but he has certain- 
ly shown a marked solicitude as to the size of the 
exposition revenues, upon which the repayment of 
the government loan depends. 

It will be remembered that the Jamestown loan 
was $1,000,000, repayable in fortnightly installments 
of $ico,ooo, the first payment to be made some time 
in July, when it was hoped that the exposition would 
have recovered from its infantile ailments and be 
fairly launched on the broad and easy path of pros- 
perity. It is too late to discuss the wisdom of such 
a loan. There was a precedent for it and it was 
made, but a single painful experience such as. now 



seems to be likely enough at Jamestown will prob- 
ably be a lesson to the Treasury that the financial 
aid of expositions is not a legitimate part of its ac- 
tivities. 

It is useless to blink the fact that the Jamestown 
show has not been a success, although the wheel of 
fickle fortune may yet do something unexpected. It 
is hard to understand why its .prosperity has not 
been greater. It was boomed by all the arts and 
crafts known to the promoter, it had the best of 
send-offs, and the show itself is by no means an in- 
significant one. But the visitors have come, not in 
the enthusiastic crowds that were anticipated, but in 
disappointing trickles, and while this was bad 
enough for the exposition authorities themselves, it 
was nothing less than heartbreaking for the side- 
show proprietors, who have paid heavily for their 
privileges, and who are now asking themselves how 
and when they can get their money back. Optim- 
ism is a part of the stock in trade of these people, 
and they keep themselves alive by all sorts of ex- 
pectations that the tide will certainly turn and give 
them a harvest after all. Probably Mr. Cortelyou is 
not so sanguine. He does not say much about it, 
but the flying visit that he paid to Jamestown on 
West Virginia Day was certainly not due to an un- 
governable desire to see the show so much as to a 
well-founded apprehension for his million dollars. 
It was confidently predicted that West Virginia 
Day would be a turning point in the fortunes of the 
exposition. It is too soon yet to say positively 
whether it was or not, but Mr. Cortelyou did not 
see much in the way of vast crowds to stimulate 
whatever hopefulness he may have had. 

Jamestown has had a good deal to contend 
against. A great many worthy people had some- 
thing more than a suspicion that it was not entirely 
bona fide, and that it was to be used to exploit the 
idea of a bigger navy and perhaps a ship subsidy, 
rather than for the commemoration objects which it 
so widely advertised. When it was found that war 
material occupied such an inordinately large place 
in the exhibits, there was an organized protest on 
the part of a number of well-meaning people, and 
this was helped by the tragedies of the war in the 
East as well as by the peace propaganda prelimin- 
ary to The Hague Conference. Peace was very 
much in the air at the moment, and a great naval 
display at Jamestown may have been felt to be in- 
congruous. 

Then, again, there were stories of bad manage- 
ment. No exposition was ever yet ready, or any- 
thing like ready, on the opening day, and probably 
Jamestown was no worse than the average, but 
memories are short nowadays, and certainly the 
early reports from Jamestown were not encouraging. 
Then, too, there were stories of extortion on the 
part of restaurants. There was nothing new about 
that, but some of them were challenged and then 
substantiated, and that also may have had a deter- 
rent effect. 

Those who are busy whistling to keep their cour- 
age up are reminding themselves that things were 
just as bad at St. Louis at a corresponding period. 
So they were, and Jamestown is entitled to all the 
satisfaction that it can get from that fact. At that 
time Secretary Shaw w&s where Mr. Cortelyou now 
is, and from his place at the receipt of custom he 
threatened several times to seize the exposition 
gates and so do justice to the Treasury. His threats 



Pacific Outlook 



31 



were inner carried out. because the tide did actual- 
ly turn and the money came rolling in. 

But then Si. Louis was very differently situated. 
St. Louis had ;i great population at its doors who 
fully intended to come to the exposition as soon 
as tl i "I and ready. But Jamestown does 

not reckon and never ha> reckoned upon local sup- 
port. The \isitors were to conn- from the North 
and bring their money with them and leave it be- 
hind them when they went, but these expected 
Northern visitors have remained at home and show 
no disposition to move. Professional showmen. 

who look at the stern facts of the case and who have 
no sectional prejudices one way or the other, say 
that there is no money in the South to support an 
exposition, and that if it does not come from the 
North it will never come at all. 

Therefore Mr. Cortelyou is in a state of financial 
disquiet. He can, of course, tike possessiop of the 
crates, hut blood can not he squeezed from a stone 
and there is no particular value about the crates un- 
less paying crowds are oassing through them. And 
he could presumably foreclose on the mortgage, but 
it is open to very grave doubt if the whole show is 
worth a million dollars. The outlook, therefore, is 
not an encouraging one. and there is nothine to do 
but to hope for better days while preparing for the 
possibility of worse ones. 

* * * 

Importance of Lubrication 

If every motorist understood how vitally impor- 
tant to the life of his car was the lubrication, it 
would not be so generally neglected. As oiling is 
such a tremendous factor in the success of a car, 
the system should be frequently examined, the mo- 



torist being well repaid l>\ saving himself expensive 
repair bills. 

9*9 

How Could She Be? 

"The lady whose name you gave as reference, 
Delia," said Mrs. Hiram Offen, "tells me you were 
not always truthful and obedient." "No, ma'am," 
replied tile new servant, "I couldn't be. wid her 
tellin' me all the time to say she wasn't at home." — 
Philadelphia Press. 

* * * 

Tempi Pasfati 

1 si, in my lonely chamber 

Ami gaze ,'lt tlie night of -tar,, 
While sorrowful thoughts surround me, 
Which open my heart's deep scars. 

1 think of the time long vanished. 
When Love wove a silken band; 

In joy we were sitting and talking 
As children do, hand in hand. 

I think of your eyes so burning; 

That kindled my soul to a flame! 
1 think of your words impassioned. 

Your glance, when you spoke my name. 

Ah, me! the times are passed, 

And stilled is the glowing word. 
But low in my heart of longing 

An echo of pain is heard. 

B. de L. 

* * * 
Rhyme, Not Poetry 
So would I not exchange 
For your my graver lot. 
The wider reach and range 
Of feelings you have not. 

— Alfred Austin. 
\nd this attempt at rhyme 
Is naught but bally "rot". 



THE WAYSIDE PRESS 

REMOVED TO 837-841 yi SOUTH SPRING ST. 

Printers, Designers, Binders 

The Character of the Work Done 
by The Wayside Press Speaks for 
Itself. The bases of the success of 
this house are 

QUALITY :: ACCURACY :: PROMPTNESS 

Home A 1853 —Phones— Main 1566 

PRINTING THAT TALKS 





THI LISSNER 

Office Building 



Fireproof — located in the advanced 
business center — the heart of the 
financial, hotel, railroad office and 
new commercial districts. 

SOUTH SPRING STREET 

BETWEEN FIFTH AND SIXTH STS. 

First-class in every way — fine elevator 
service, electric light, steam heat, gas, 
hot and cold water, compressed air, 
vacuum cleaning system. Light, airy, 
cheerful rooms. 



Office Reservations May Be Made Now 

$15 to $50 Per Month 

According to size and location 
Ready about September 1 



M. LISSNER 

BOTH PHONES 1292 



322 DOUGLAS 
BUILDING 



Desks for Less 



Desks for Less 



#> 



AV7E are office specialists. We buy 
desks — We exchange desks — We 
sell desks. 

r9* •$• •$• 

L* A* Desk Exchange 

105 North Broadway 



The L C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter 

("Writing in SigHt) 




.Rigid Carriage; Removable Platen'; Paper Feed that never balks; Tabulator 
with every machine; Device for writing in two colors. Send For Art 
Catalogue free 



I*. dX M. Alexander CSL Co. Pacific Coast Dealers 
131 South Broad-way. Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones Home 1 906-Main 5959 



l.. A-**.. .c. w .™ ,. THE LOS ANGELES "JOKEFEST" 



August 17. 1907 










■I 






SINGLE COPY 10 CENTS 



BY THE YEAR«>2°2 



IBM 

H 



i 



\, 




The waning of summer brings forth bargains in many lines. Although 
the season is not much more than half over we are beginning already 
to prepare for Fall business, and are closing out a number of hand- 
some shirt waists at notable reductions. See our advertisement in 
Sunday's papers for prices on shirt waists and other lines of season- 
able merchandise. Best values here always. 



"50/~\ETMl 



O I /Si G ■ 




BROADWAY 



COR FirTH ST. 




'Ufye True OsteopatK 

is the true 

PHYSICIAN 

He must be fitted to do the best thing possible under 
every conceivable circumstance of human suffering. 

The Pacific College of Osteopathy 

Will teach you the science of the true Osteopath. 
Fall term begins September 3. Officers: J. O. Hunt, 
Pres.; Stanley •M. Hunter, Vice-Pres.; W. J. Cook, 
Sec, and C. A. Whiting, Chairman of the Faculty. 
Address the secretary for full information. Cor. Daly 
Street and Mission Road, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Teachers for California 

IttltE have positions open 
for competent teachers 
in every grade, at salaries 
ranging from $60.00 to 
$300.00 per month, f If 
you have not taken recent 
examinations and feel a 
little uncertain on some 
vital points — Remember 
that we have a thoroughly 
organized training course that 
will help you. 

Co-operative Teachers' Association 

406-7-8 Chamber of Commerce Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



iMism^ Diray>DiE 



George Bak*r Jtndersan 
EDITOR 



Jl Southwestern Weekly 

Mary Holland Kinkaid 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 



Howard Clark Gatloupm 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 



Published every Saturday at 492.423 Chamber of Com* 
marc* Build. ng, Los Jtngeles, California, by the 

Pacific Outlook Company. 

Subscription prlcw SS.OO a year in advance. Single copy to 
cents on alt news stands. 

Entered »• second-class matter April $, ii)^, it the posloffice at Los Angeles, 
California, under the act of Congress of March j, 1879. 

Vol. 3. Los Jtngetes, Cat., August 17, 1907 Mo. 7 



The Editor of the Pacific Outlook cannot guarantee to return manuscripts, 
though he will endeavor to do so if stamps for that purpose are inclosed with them. 
If your manuscript is valuable, keep a copy of it. 

NOTICE. TO SUBSCRIBERS 

The Pacific Outlook is mailed to subscribers through 
the Los Angeles Post office every Friday, and should be 
delivered in every part of the city by Saturday's post. If 
for any reason it should be delayed, or be delivered in 
poor condition, subscribers will confer a favor upon the 
publishers by giving them immediate notice. The date on 
the wrapper shows the time to which your subscription is 
paid as shown by our ledgers. No receipts will be mailed 
unless specially requested. Telephone Home A 7926. 



"For what is a man profited, if he shall gain the 
whole world, and lose his own soul?" Respectfully 
referred to the "bought" newspapers of California. 

COMMENT 

The Republicans of California, in organizing 
themselves into a league whose aim shall be the 
restoration to their party of the powers which are 
inherently its own, have set a good example to 
other states where the party has become a victim 
to the wiles of predatory corporations. Other states 
have suffered in this direction, but in California the 

piratical incursions of corporate in- 
Party Has terests, chiefly the Southern Pacific 
Been Asleep railroad, have been carried further 

and with greater success than else- 
where. Students of politics from other sections of 
the United States stand aghast at the conditions 
which have been rendered possible in the Golden 
State, partly through the cupidity of bosses acting 
in behalf of a great corporation and partly through 
the supineness of the great mass of voters of which 
the party is composed. Like Gulliver among the 
Liliputians, the party has slept while wicked forces, 
puny enough when held up for analysis, have tied 
its hands. 

* * * 

When the principles underlying the movement 
which took form in Oakland August 1 are intelli- 
gently applied, as they will be in the hands to which 



they have been intrusted, the solution of the hither- 
to vexing problem of self-control will be relatively 
easy. Like n gnat engineering problem the de- 
tails of which have been carefully wrought out by 
experienced men. about all that remains to be done 
is to work. Much must be done, and none of it will 
be found to be child's play, but there is nothing 
intricate or involved in the task at hand. The prime 
consideration was organization. That already has 
been accomplished. It could not well be improved 
upon. Henceforth the labor will be, chiefly, pub- 
licity and smaller local organizations within the 

parent body, the Lincoln-Roosevelt 
"Logical" League of Republican Clubs of Califor- 
Leadership nia. It is unthinkable that any patriotic 

Republican voter of California will 
shrink from identifying himself with the house- 
cleaning movement. Those who believe that Wil- 
liam F. Herrin, the purchaser of men, of caucuses, 
of conventions, of legislatures and even of courts — 
withal a Democrat — is the "logical" leader of the 
Republican party in California, or who believe that 
Walter F. X. Parker is the "logical" leader of the 
party in Los Angeles and Southern California, may 
not at once see their way clear to take a hand in 
the wholesome, healthful task of ridding the party 
of these" "logical leaders". But unless we mistake 
the temper of the people those of this class will be 
found to be of relatively small numerical strength 
after the educational campaign about to be inaugur- 
ated is well under way. 

* * * 
California has 'suffered much at the hands of its 
political bosses. Its political history during the 
past score of years finds no parallel in American 
annals. The character of the men whose labors 
made this state what it was within a few years after 
the advent of the argonauts, men wdio by force of 
circumstances were compelled to trust more to the 
efforts of the individual than to the established au- 
thorities when they sought justice, unquestionably 
had a marked effect upon the destiny of the com- 
monwealth. The sons and the grandsons of these 
men inherited, to some extent, the proclivities of 

their pioneer ancestors. The firmer es- 
End of the tablishment of institutions of state and 
Oligarchy their powers was not accompanied at 

once by that enlivened interest in the 
functions of government which is the result of 
slower civic development. Government was left 
largely to a few men in the earlier days. As the 



Pacific Outlook 



state grew the sense of individual responsibility 
stood still, relatively. But at last it has awakened. 
The shame and degradation incident to an oligarchi- 
cal form of government in America in the Twentieth 
Century have aroused Californians by the tens of 
thousands in all parts of the state. Lethargy has 
given way to vigilant wakefulness, indifference to 
keen interest. The Southern Pacific machine is 
doomed. 

* * * 

"We take Cunning for a sinister or crooked wis- 
dom," said Bacon. "And certainly there is a great 
difference between a cunning man and a wise man, 
not only in point of honesty, but in point of ability. 
There be that can pack the cards, and yet cannot 
play well ; so there are some that are good in can- 
vasses and factions, that are otherwise weak men." 
If Lord Bacon, the wise man of old England, had 
lived in California in the present day and had start- 
ed to write his famous essay on Cun- 
Packing ning, having in mind certain aspects of 
the Cards the political situation in this state, he 
probably would have begun his disqui- 
sition with the words he used toward the close of 
the Sixteenth Century. "There be that can pack 
the cards." Yea, there be; and the process of pack- 
ing never ends. The cards are already packed. The 
Southern Pacific manipulators are acting in the ca- 
pacity of shuffler, dealer, and stake-holder. Under 
such circumstances it takes a bold opponent to call 
the hand held, but the call will be made at the next 
deal, and onlookers may depend upon it that the 
hand will be exposed and found to be beaten. 

* * * 

The "organization" newspapers — by the term 
"organization" we mean the existing Southern Pa- 
cific organization — may be depended upon to adopt 
every known editorial device to nurture in the 
minds of the people of California the idea that the 
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League aims at the 
disruption of the Republican party or that its 
founders and promoters are planning a general 
scramble for public office. Nothing, however, could 
be further from the truth. In regard to legislative 
candidates only will the league seek offices, and in 
that particular the office will seek the man and 

not the man the office, as has been the 

Watch rule in California. The greatest need 

• the League of the state just now is a legislature 

free from Southern Pacific influence, 
and naturally the league will work harder to at- 
tain this desideratum than in any other direction. 
The league will endeavor to secure the nomination 
of the very best men available in the different legis- 
lative districts to the end that the legislature may 
become in fact as well as in name representative 
of the people rather than the subservient tool of 
the Herrins and the Parkers. Watch every move 



of the league. Mr. Voter, and become convinced 
that this is true. If you find to the contrary, then 
vote for the machine nominees at the next election. 

* * * 

It looks like a far cry to the gubernatorial cam- 
paign of 1909, but inasmuch as the local Democracy 
has begun grooming Mayor Harper for the race it 
may be as well to cast an eye over the possibilities 
offered by the Republican party. There is plenty 
of good material in both parties. But it is a fore- 
gone conclusion that the succcessful candidate must 
be a man who is known to oppose further depreda- 
tions on the part of the Southern Pacific railroad 
through the political bureau it has placed in charge 
of Boss Herrin. The candidate of either party must 
be acceptable to both the northern and southern sec- 
tions of the state. It is doubtful if a Southern Cali- 
fornia man can be elected. A candidate from the 
central or northern part of the state, if generally re- 
garded as free from those prejudices 
Nye for which have influenced Governor Gillett, 
Governor doubtless will be acceptable to the 
southern section. Take a man like A. 
B. Nye, for instance. It is very doubtful if it will 
be possible to find a man who more nearly ap- 
proaches the high standard that will be demanded 
by the better element in the Republican party than 
he. Mr. Nye's efforts, as state controller, to relieve 
the smaller taxpayers of the state of the burdens im- 
posed upon them by the great corporations, notably 
the Southern Pacific and trolley railway corpora- 
tions, are evidence enough that, as Governor, he 
would employ every effort toward the protection of 
the people. The fact that he is persona non grata 
with the railroad machine, in itself, has given him 
a strong following. The Pacific Outlook respect- 
fully commends his name to the consideration of 
the unbossed Republican press of the state. 

* * * 

• 

A week has elapsed since the Pacific Outlook ex- 
pressed the belief that this was to be the only paper 
and the Voters' League the only civic organization 
which "will consistently maintain the attitude as- 
sumed by the leading organizations and most of the 
press of Los Angeles during the early days of the 
agitation for the appointment of a good highway 
commission." Up to the hour when this paragraph 
was written the situation has not changed, so faf 
as we have been able to learn, excepting that in the 
meantime the Voters' League has declared un- 
equivocally against the proposed 
Highway Bonds bond issue for the improvement 
Opposed of the county highways while the 

highway commission stands as 
at present. After carefully going over the matter 
the leag'ue has adopted this resolution : "That the 
executive committee of the Los Angeles Voters' 
League is heartily in favor of new and improved 



Pacific Outlook 



roads; l>m as it is necessary to prevent improper 
expenditure of public funds, i His committee respect- 
fully recommends the people of Los Angeles county 
to vote against any and all bonds for highway im- 
provements, because the members of the county 
highway commission were not appointed in accord- 
ance with recommendatons of the civic bodies of 
this city." 

* * * 

One of the officers of the league, in explaining the 

motive of that body in taking this action, says that 
in passing the resolution the league was actuated 
by the fact that the law gives the Board of Super- 
visors ultimate control ." expenditures for mood 
roads, and. as the Pacific Outlook has said, the ma- 
jority of the members of the board might accept 
and act in accordance with a minority report from 
the highway commission. "The supervisors," de- 
clares this official, "will continue to act contrary to 

the -will of the people as long as they 
Change weakly condone such action. This 

Demanded virtual veto is needed that we may not 

practically encourage any extravagant 
or unjustifiable expenditure for political or selfish 
purposes." No doubt the Voters' League will re- 
consider its action and support the bonds if Mr. 
Marsh, the politician member of the highway com- 
mission, can be induced to resign and if the super- 
visors will appoint in his place a man in whom the 
voters of both parties have confidence. We believe 
the bonds should be defeated and that they surely 
will be defeated if the proposed change in the per- 
sonnel of the highway commission be not effected 
before the issue is placed before the people at the 
polls. 

* * * 

A member of the New York Legislature who has 
been making an extended trip through the West and 
Southwest believes that he has found in this section 
of the country a powerful and growing sentiment in 
favor of Governor Hughes of New York for suc- 
cessor to President Roosevelt. "The people in the 
East," he says, "have absolutely no idea of the im- 
pression Governor Hughes's personality has made 

upon the people in the West and 

The West Sputhwest. In Texas, especially, 

and Hughes our Governor's words and actions 

are being studied as those of no 
other Governor outside of Texas ever have been, 
and there is bound to be an overwhelming demand 
for him as a presidential nominee. They see in his 
record of the first six months of the year that. 
statesmanship which it is going to be necessary for 
the different states to pursue to make it unnecessary 
for the national government to encroach further 
upon what some people regard as the functions of a 
state government." 



It is but natural that in such States as Texas and 

Missouri, where the corporations have been at- 
tacked with greater or less success for yens past. 
frequentlj without rhyme or reason, that any man 

who. like Governor Hughes, has demonstrated his 

inclination and his ability to compel railroad and 
other public utility corporations to do that which 
approaches their duty toward the public, the chief 
executive of the Empire State should have a strong 
following. While Governor Hughes may have 
many admirers in these states, and while he un- 
doubtedly he has a very strong following in Cali- 
fornia, it is doubtful if the Republicans — as well as 
many Democrats — in California are prepared to 

abandon all hope that Roosevelt 

Conditions may finally be persuaded that it is 

Have Changed his duty to accept the nomination 

for a second full term. There is 
an old saying, and a wise one, to the effect that a 
bad promise is better broken than kept. Conditions 
to-day and four years ago are so widely at variance, 
so many problems have arisen in the meantime, so 
overwhelming has the Roosevelt sentiment become 
as the outcome of his successes in dealing with the 
great corporation problems which have vexed the 
people until they have reached a state of despera- 
tion, that California Republicans probably will not 
abandon their struggle to secure the consent of 
Roosevelt to accept a nomination to succeed him- 
self, in order that there may be no failure in carry- 
ing out the policies for which he is known to stand, 
until the last stronghold of their faith has been 
broken down. 

* * * 

Hughes unquestionably looms large on the poli- 
tical horizon. He is a man of wonderful strength 
and capacity, he has a firm grasp of the questions 
at issue between the people and the defiant corpora- 
tions, he has a splendid legal training, he never has 
faltered in the face of duty to the people, and his 

management of the campaign in be- 

California's half of better regulation of public 

Attitude utility corporations in New York 

State proves that in one respect at 
least voters of all parties will find, in him a man who 
has practical ideas in regard to a problem that is of 
the most vital interest to the nation. Hughes may 
be the man, but California may be depended upon 
to make the most desperate endeavor to induce 
Roosevelt to reconsider his determination as ex- 
pressed immediately after his election in 1904. 

* * * 

Laws are made to be enforced. If a law is a bad 
one, unjust or unfair, the best way to remedy the 
conditions it imposes is to enforce it to the letter. 
The City Council enacted certain ordinances hav- 
ing to do with the matter of taxation and license 



Pacific Outlook 



fees. Electric railway companies, owners of office 
buildings and others who felt that the operation of 
the ordinance would impose a burden upon them 
iprotested, in a most irregular man- 
The Mushet ner, with the result that the ordi- 
Disclosures nance became practically a dead let- 
ter, so far as its application in full in 
the cases noted was concerned. The city tax col- 
lector, for some reason which has not yet been offi- 
cially explained, allowed the affected interests to 
interpret the law for him, with the result that there 
has been saved to these private interests and lost to 
the public tens of thousands of dollars annually for 
some time past. This, in brief, is the story told by 
City Auditor Mushet in his preliminary special re- 
port to the council. 

* * * 

The tax collector may be able to explain his de- 
linquency to the satisfaction of the council and the 
people of Los Angeles. But it is to be apprehended 
that he will have difficulty in doing so. It is not 
likely that the good intentions of this official will 
be generally questioned. For years the affairs of 
the city have been administered in a most lax and 
therefore reprehensible manner, and it is but na- 
tural that the average public official should be in- 
fluenced in his course more or less by his environ- 
ments and the policy of looseness 
Influence of and dereliction which characterizes 
Environment? the work of his contemporaries. It 
would appear that Mr. Johnson, 
the tax collector, has so administered the affairs of 
his office as to avoid having trouble with the inter- 
ests that have desired to evade the payment of their 
just proportion of taxes, in accordance with the 
ordinance. That makes him the average city offi- 
cial. But City Auditor Mushet is head and should- 
ers above the average. He evidently believes that 
a public official's duty to the people is not done 
until he has enforced the laws applying to his de- 
partment of government, without fear or favor. It 
is to be regretted that there are so few Mushets 
serving the city of Los Angeles. 

* * * 

The delinquences of the tax collector's depart- 
ment, grievous as they may appear, are slight when 
compared with the shortcomings of the police de- 
partment. We base this judgment upon the facts 
presented by Mr. Mushet in his report. He says: 
"Under the license ordinance it is the duty of all 
police officers to examine all places of business and 
persons in their respective beats liable to pay a 
license, and they are required to make out a month- 
ly report of all persons doing business on their beat 
without a city license, and in case of neglect so to 



do they are guilty of neglect of duty and are liable 
to suspension or dismissal. This is ab- 
Serious solutely a 'dead letter' so far as the police 
Charges co-operation is concerned." This is a 
charge. It should receive the immediate 
consideration of Mayor Harper and his police com- 
mission. It is clearly the duty of the mayor to take 
this matter up with the police commission without 
delay. The charge made by Mr. Mushet is alto- 
gether too serious a reflection upon the adminis- 
tration to pass without full investigation to deter- 
mine its truth or falsity. And while the mayor is at 
it, why not probe into other matters pertaining to 
the conduct of the police department? Here is a 
fine opportunity for the mayor to do something 
practical toward giving the city the "business ad- 
ministration" promised by him before the election. 

* * * 

Mayor Harper is to be commended for his hu- 
manitarian act in taking steps looking toward the 
amelioration of the condition of the wretched fami- 
lies which are compelled by their poverty to make 
their homes in miserable shacks in various parts of 
the city. Though Dr. Titian Coffey, who has been 
devoting much time to the question of housing the 
city's poor, declares that conditions now are a hun- 
dred per cent better than a year ago, the mayor 
wants to see them several hundred per cent better. 

To this end he advocates the ap- 

Work for pointment of several additional in- 

Hum.anitar.ians spectors who will keep a close 

watch on the conditions surround- 
ing unfortunate people of this class, most of whom 
are Mexicans, Slavs and other foreigners of the 
lower classes. Here is a fertile field for local hu- 
manitarians. The mayor needs all the assistance 
and co-operation he can secure in the task to which 
he has set his hand. If the amelioration of the 
state of inhabitants of the class referred to were 
the only tangible result of the present administra- 
tion, Mayor Harper's record in this field would en- 
title him to a permanent place in local history as 
a public benefactor. 

* * * 

Recent events in connection with the conduct of 
a notorious liquor dive in this city and the protec- 
tion which its proprietor appears to have enjoyed at 
the hands of the police department suggest two or 
three very pertinent queries. First, Is the saloon 
the servant or the master in Los Angeles? Second, 
Is the police department intended as an intrument 
for the protection of the saloons or for the protec- 
tion, equally, of the people — more especially of 
wayward girls? Third, Is the saloon to continue 
to be, as it has been in the past, one of the chief 
factors in local politics, the partner of the political 



Pacific Outlook 



7 



bureau of the railroad, and altogether too Frequent- 
ly a chief issue in <U-tcrniiniii.LT ward 
Police and control? Here arc a few problems ly- 
Saloons in.c within the purview of the mayor. 
The mayor designates the members of 
the police commission, which handles the license 
question, The police commission, of which the 
mayor is a member, names the chief of police, who 
either enforces the law or obeys the decrees of the 
police commission, according to the quality of his 
conscience and the flexibility or rigidity of his 
spine. In any event the whole problem comes back 
to roost in the mayor's office, who is directly re- 
sponsible for the character of the police commis- 
sion and indirectly responsible for the chief of po- 
lice. As a matter of fact, in ninety-nine cases out 
of a hundred the mayor actually names the chief, 
and the present case is not the hundredth. 

* * * 

The Pacific Outlook has suspected from the start 
that former Mayor McAleer's candidate for the 
office of chief of the police department was not 
exactly the man for the place. From the second 
issue of this paper. October 2J last, we reproduce 
these prophetic words: "But the fact that Mr. Kern 
has won friends by reason of his abounding good 
nature is no proof whatever that he would make a 
safe chief of the police department. The things 
that count heavily against him are not only his 
well-known friendship for the local Southern Pa- 
cific authorities, but his relations with an enemy of 
just as dangerous a character 
Mayor Harper's (some will say more dangerous) — 

Opportunity the allied liquor interests." A 
month later we said: "The his- 
tory of American cities has demonstrated that small 
ward politicians, and especially those who truckle 
to the saloon element, are might}' poor timber for 
heads of police departments." It must be highly 
gratifying to a man of Mayor Harper's moral char- 
acter that he had no hand in the selection of the 
present chief executive officer of the police depart- 
ment. But realizing, as he must, that that depart- 
ment of municipal government has become a by- 
word among decent people, does he not realize, 
also, that he occupies the one logical position from 
which to institute proceedings for the reform of that 
bureau? Is there nothing in the "Bucket of Blood" 
nightly' tragedy that appeals to a man of his fine 
instincts ? 

* * * 

The Civil Service Commission has scored one for 
civil service, and Councilman Wren is elated. Dur- 
ing his recent investigation of abuses existing in the 
management of the receiving hospital, that double- 
headed institution where such a thing as respon- 
sible authority is unknown, Mr. Wren made des- 
perate efforts to prevent the council from making 



the hospital a political toy, but without avail. Now, 

however, the Civil Service Commission has had its 
inning, and has compelled the council to show some 

respect for the civil service law. It 
Civil Service has demonstrated that a political 
Triumphant "pull" will not always succeed in 

keeping in office favorites of the 
dominant party. The council on more than one oc- 
casion has attempted to nullify the action of the 
Civil • Service Commission, and it probably would 
have kept Police Surgeons Clark and Goodrich in 
office if the commission had not interposed an ob- 
jection. Two civil service appointees will fill the 
places of the men with a "pull". Now let Mr. Wren 
renew his fight for a single-headed hospital with 
some semblance of authority, and keep up the fight 
until he wins. It will be something of a job, but 
Mr. Wren has it in him to put it through. 

* * * 

The "comeback" restaurant men who insist that 
such common articles of diet as bread and butter 
should not be subject to the operation of the ordi- 
nance regulating the conduct of eating houses are 
making a stiff fight for the legalizing of this favor- 
ite form of "handout". The health officials, on the 
other hand, demand that the "comeback" be elim- 
inated from the bills of fare, in whatever guise it 
may appear. Why not let the cheap 
"Comeback" restaurants serve all the "come- 

Problem backs" they desire to? This could 
be done without any serious menace 
to the health of the community. All that would be 
necessary would be the amendment of the present 
ordinance providing that every restaurateur in- 
cluding diet of this character in his offering to the 
public should put in conspicuous places, in front of 
and .inside his place of business, signs on which, 
in large letters, patrons should be warned that 
"comebacks" were liable to come back to them. 
This is an easy solution of the question. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles ice trust may be regarded as. 
almost a public benefactor when compared with the 
ice monopoly which is bleeding the residents of 
Hollywood. When it was announced two or three 
weeks ago that the Los Angeles combination had 
raised prices to such a figure that the small con- 
sumer was compelled to pay a rate so high as fifty 
cents per hundred, a terrific roar ascended to the 
fog banks which overspread the skies on that day. 

But the tolerant citizens of Holly- 
Hollywood's wood are paying sixty cents per hun- 
Iceman dred for the same service, without 

protest, except such as may be offered 
in a mild manner, now and then, by individuals. 
There has been no united effort to persuade the 
Hollywood ice trust to bring its prices down to a 



Pacific Outlook 



reasonable figure, so far as we are, able to learn. 
Families taking fifty-pound pieces every other day 
during the week, or three times per week, as most 
of them do, pay four dollars per month, slightly 
more or less, for their ice. How would you like 
to be the Hollywood iceman? . 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Herald makes the argument 
that "lack of patronage" ultimately will put an end 
to the business transacted by the coastwise steam- 
ship companies if the fact be made generally known 
that the officers in command of these vessels are 
instructed to "make time", regardless of weather 
conditions. "If it shall be determined that the 
City of Panama was pushed through a fog," says 
the Herald, "solely that she might make time, it is 
the duty of Captain Bermingham to take cogni- 
zance of that fact and place the blame on the man- 
agement. Let the people know 
From One Hand of these things and the lack of 

to the Other patronage sure to follow will be 
the best cure for these crying 
evils." Hardly a cure. Why take the money 
out of one of the railroad's cash drawers to put it 
in another? The Herald surely must be aware of 
the fact that the men who own the coastwise steam- 
ers are the men who own, Or partly own, the rail- 
roads. Lack of patronage for the water route means 
increase of patronage for the land route — and the 
transportation rates by land are higher than by wa- 
ter. - The railroads will hail with delight the loss of 
the patronage now accorded the steamships. It will 
simply help to fatten the railroad purse. 

* * * 

The cocky little Japs may speedily regret their 
arbitrary turning down of the proposals submitted 
by our government for the adjudication of the dif- 
ferences which have arisen between the two na- 
tions. Never before in history has there been so 
much evidence of the national swelled head as there 
is at the present time in the case of Japan. The 
United States government has gone a long way out 
of its path to extend the olive branch to the govern- 
ment of the Mikado. While the ad- 
National ministration unquestionably will do 
Swelled Head everything in its power to preserve 
peaceful relations with the island 
empire, it need not be expected to dig a hole and 
crawl into it in order that the apparently insatiable 
appetite of the Japs may be partially appeased. 
President Roosevelt' is reported to be exasperated 
over the failure of the negotiations instituted 
through Ambassador Wright. If Japan is able to 
interpret the American temper she will profit by 
the knowledge that the administration feels that it 
has gone as far as it consistently can in its en- 
deavors to bring order out of chaos in the present 
exigency. 



We have assumed altogether too condescending 
an attitude toward the Japanese as a nation. The 
American people and the federal government should 
do everything possible to insure the maintenance 
of peaceful relations between the two countries, 
but we cannot hope to do so by taking any step 
that will cause us to lose the respect which one na- 
tion naturally exhibits toward another when that 
other stands firmly on principle. We believe the 
administration made a mistake when it allowed 
itself to be worried into offering the naturalization 
of the Japanese as partial com- 
Naturalization pensation for concessions sought 
Not Yet or expected of the Mikado's gov- 

ernment. Japan's arrogance, plain- 
ly shown by the manner in which the American 
proposals have been rejected, is exactly what might 
have been apprehended. But that is neither here 
nor there. While Japanese laborers are not unwel- 
come on the Pacific coast, except in communities 
where Tveitmoeism is rampant, the sentiment of the 
coast is overwhelmingly adverse to their admission 
to citizenship. They are welcome as laborers — if 
they desire to come, without invitation — but many 
a day must elapse before they will be welcomed as 
citizens in that section where they are best known. 
* * * 

TAINTED! 



From the San Francisco Cam, 

It seems a pity that a newspaper usually so well 
edited and so fair as the New York Times should 
go to such a disreputable source as R. H. Hay 
Chapman for information about the conditions that 
obtain in San Francisco. This Chapman, in the 
first place, is not a San Franciscan — for which 
heaven be thanked — and in the next place, he is 
notoriously hostile to everything San Franciscan 
upon which he is not permitted to levy for the sup- 
port of himself and his predatory weekly, the Los 
Angeles Graphic. 

The Pacific coast is cursed with publications of 
this kind, many of them subsisting on the border 
line of blackmail and most of them purchasable at a 
price — a low price. Of them all, the Graphic, con- 
ducted by this man named Chapman, is meanest 
and cheapest. It never did have anything but ill to 
say of San Francisco or San Franciscans until the 
graft prosecutions began to get warm. 

Sniffing the rottenness from afar, Chapman made 
a quick flight from Los Angeles. How he got him- 
self on the payrolls of the United Railroads and 
other corporations caught in the act of boodling 
San Francisco officials Chapman will probably not 
care to explain, but he got there with expert alac- 
rity. For months his sheet has been' among the 
most offensive of the "tainted press"; his sheet has 
been thrust into every editorial room in California 
with passages marked to show how Chapman was 
earning his vile wages. 

From the beginning Chapman has been denounc- 



Pacific Outlook 



9 



ing with the virulence of his kind the prosecution 
anil all iis works. No issue of his hired journal lias 
failed to extol Calhoun or some other indicted mag- 
nate. And all the time, in the space not bought by 
the interests detected in crime. Chapman's paper 
ha> been rejoicing over San Francisco's misfortunes, 
magnifying, distorting and manufacturing — any- 
thing to injure thi> city. 

And tliis was the reliable investigator, tire un- 
prejudiced observer selected by the New York 
Times to inform its readers about the motives, the 
men and the methods of the graft prosecution and 
the streetcar strike. Chapman's letter, three col- 
umns of it. appears in the limes of July 29. It is 

just what might have been expected by anybody 
who has had a stout enough stomach to read Chap- 
man's Los Angeles Graphic. It lauds Calhoun and 
it damns Rudolph Spreckels. 

The graft prosecution (says Chapman) is part of 
a hellish conspiracy to take the streetcar monopoly 
away from the virtuous Calhoun and give it to the 
wicked Spreckels. The streetcar strike was started 
and is kept going by Spreckels for the same pur- 
pose. The prosecution's attempt to hand over the 
selection of a clean city government to a council of 
citizens was "an effort to inveigle the civic bodies 
into a convention with the leaders of labor, who 
are engaged in the criminal restraint of trade," and 
the prosecution, "at last whipped into submission 
and driven to decency by public opinion, was com- 
pelled to elect a mayor of whom she need not hold 
her head in shame." While Calhoun was heroically 
rehabilitating the city Spreckels was "raising rents, 
thus giving labor cause for increasing its demands." 
Also. "Spreckels's defeat of Calhoun," which seems 
to be a polite phrase for the trolley magnate's con- 
viction, "would mean a perpetuation of those forces 
with which this ambitious capitalist has chosen to 
align himself for the consummation of his schemes 
of jealousy and revenge." 

Thus and much more of the same thing, R. H. Hay 
Chapman in the Times. Where Chapman is known 
he can do decent men no harm and rogues no good. 

But the Xew York Times has the reputation of a 
clean paper for clean people. If it wishes to stay 
clean it needs to beware of the Chapmans. They 
are tainted. 

* * * 

Publicity Its Chief "Weapon 

In explaining the character of the movement for 
the reorganization of the Republican party in Cali- 
fornia in pursuance of plans formulated at Oakland 
August 1, when the Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican 
League of California was formed, the Sacramento 
Union, speaking with authority, says: 

"It cannot be too clearly understood that this is 
a Republican movement, by Republicans, and en- 
tirely within the Republican party. The sponsors 
for this movement have not the smallest notion 
of organizing a new political party or of creating 
factions in the Republican party. Its one purpose 
is to redeem the party from non-Republican con- 
trol. It is notorious that the head of the political 
bureau of the Southern Pacific company, which 
bureau has dominated the Republican partv (save 
and except the administration of Governor Pardee), 
is a Democrat and never was a Republican, and 
yet, knowing this full well, he has been able to find 



enough subservient and serviceable Republicans to 
take orders from a Democrat and execute them 
without question. 

"It is not unlikelj that the sponsors For the Lin- 
coln-Roosevelt movement will be accused of being 
renegade Republicans, but if anything more trea- 
sonable to Republicanism could be devised than 

taking orders from a Democratic boss it would be 

hard in say what form that treason could take. 

"Finally, it should he clearly understood that the 
Lincoln-Roosevelt Republican League movement 
has no quarrel with corporations as such, and it 
has no especial quarrel with the Southern Pacific 
company in its functions of doing a transportation 
business. It was organized to assail and over- 
throw the political bureau of the Southern Pacific 
company and political interests allied with that 
bureau. 

"It is not likely that this organization will create 
a political machine to supplant the Southern Pa- 
cific political machine, but it will endeavor to cre- 
ate an effective organization for appealing to Re- 
publicans and independent voters throughout the 
state. The chief weapon employed will be pub- 
licity reinforced by effective activity in political 
affairs. The movement is one that deserves the 
hearty and practical support of all Republicans 
who believe in free government and of all mem- 
bers of all parties who saction the Roosevelt 
policies and wish to see them continued four years 
more." 

* * * 

Mrs. Olive Thome Miller's B00K 

Mrs. Olive Thorne Miller, who has been living in 
Los Angeles for the last two years, has succeeded 
in writing a book for girls which is winning the 
highest praise from the critics everywhere. Mrs. 
Miller, who is a grandmother, is best known 
through her charming works dealing with birds, 
but in fiction she has made a first place for herself. 
"What Happened to Barbara", her latest story, has 
the wholesome charm that insures the widest popu- 
larity. Barbara lived before the Civil War, or 
rather, she was a- fourteen-year-old girl in the fifties, 
and it was then that she had many troubles and 
many pleasures. There is much incident in the 
book, for Barbara traveled from her New England 
ho,me to far off Minnesota with her Lmcle Karl and 
later journeyed to the western frontier with her 
father, who went forth to try his fortunes in a new 
place. Houghton, Miflin and Company have put 
the story into an attractive volume, clearly printed 
on good paper. 

Since she came to Los Angeles Mrs. Miller has 
lived quietly with her daughter. Miss Mary Mann 
Miller. She occupies a pretty house which she 
built on the edge of the Arroyo Seco. Garvanza. 
The arroyo gives her opportunities to study the bird 
life of Southern California and she is an inspiration 
to the local Audubon societies. This much loved 
author is a beautiful, white haired woman who has 
retained the vigor of her earlier years. She is a 
brilliant conversationalist and from her experience 
is able to offer many a beautiful memory to those 
who seek her in her retirement. She leads a busy 
life and has more demand for literary work than 
she can meet. 



10 



Pacific Outlook 



THE "JO REFEST 



Los Angeles to be trie Humor Center of tHe Country Next MontH 



When the week of September 15 rolls 'round 
Los Angeles will be noted as the humor-center of 
the United States for, from that date till Septem- 
ber 22, a majority of the best-known funny men of. 
the American press and platform will be congre- 
gated here'. Also the City of the Angels will have 
an opportunity to hear them at their best .in an en- 
tertainment whose object is an inspiration to the 
humorist — the building of a monument to Bill Nye 
at Laramie. Upon the patronage of this entertain- 
ment depends the share of credit Los Angeles will 
obtain in the general monument project, for in all 
parts of the country, the American Press Humorists 
are urging support of the idea, although they ex- 
pect the banner contribution to be the receipts of 
the public entertainment here and that local success 
will work corresponding good elsewhere. 

While the Nye monument idea has been discussed 
by the humorists of America ever since Nye's 




Frank Thompson Searight, Los Angeles 

t 

death, nothing came of it, through lack of a leader 
or want of definite plan of action, until this sum- 
mer, when the secretary-treasurer of the American 
Press Humorists, Frank Thompson Searight of Los 
Angeles, set about arranging for the fifth annual ■ 
convention of the association. He decided to make 
this convention notable in more ways than one and 
planned a campaign for a monument to the bard of 
Laramie — a campaign which has been taken up by 
the press of the entire country, and is to have its 
climax, or anti-climax, in Los Angeles. 

After securing offers of services from no less 
than twelve of the leading humorous writers and 
lecturers, Secretary Searight prevailed upon the 
Rev. Dr. Robert J. Burdette to persuade the man- 
agement of the Auditorium to give the use of that 
popular theater for an afternoon, and it was ar- 
ranged to hold the Nye entertainment September 
20. The programme includes an array of humorous 



talent for which the average lyceum manager would 
give his right arm, almost, for the names of the en- 
tertainers are those of "Bob" Burdette, Eli Perkins, 
Charles Battell Loomis, Strickland W. Gillilan, Ed- 
mund Vance Cooke, Wilbur D. Nesbit, S. E. Kiser, 
Thomas Augustine Daly, Judd Mortimer Lewis, 
Holman, F. Day, Sam Davis, Henry Edward 




Thomas Augustine Daly, Philadelphia 

Warner, E. W. Miller, James Barton Adams, and 
Louis James. 

In spite of the fact that one or two of the original 
number of entertainers have expressed .doubt, re- 
cently, as to their ability to make the trip, the list has 
been increased to fifteen. Mr. James is the only 
one on the programme not a member of the asso- 
ciation. Through his manager, Wallace Munro of 
New York, he proffered his services to the press 
humorists' secretary a few days ago, with the mes- 
sage that, as he was a warm personal friend of Ed- 
gar Wilson Nye, he desired to be of any assistance 
possible in procuring a monument to the popular 
humorist. Fortunately he found that his engage- 




Lowell Oxus Reese, alta, Cal. 

ment at the Mason opera house is the same week as 
the humorists' convention. Tickets for the humor- 
ists' entertainment have been placed on sale at 
Bartlett's music store, No. 231 South Broadway. 

Responses received by Mr. Searight show that 
between forty and fifty of the American Press 
Humorists will be in attendance at this convention. 
The Alexandria will be headquarters and the week 
will be one of solid pleasure, beginning with a 



Pacific Outlook 



11 



Vngeles" trip, and including visits to 
Mi. Low* - brie], the beaches mi the Balloon 

Route, the ' Istrich farm, touring Pasadena, a day 

at the home of the Rev. I >r. ami Mrs. Burdette,' 
Sunnycrest, Pasadena, banquets and probably a trip 
around the Kite-shaped Track. 

The Southern California Women's Press Club 
will give a reception for tin- women accompanying 
the humorists. An interesting side-trip will be made 
on the way back east — a visit to Goldfield. There 
tbc Goldfield Press Club will show the humorists 
the mines, the city ami the way to beat tbc faro- 
banks, ami there will be a banquet for tbc writers 
at the Hotel Casey. Secretary Searight returned re- 
cently from a trip to Goldfield, where be arranged 
for the entertainment of tbc members of tbc asso- 




Arthur J. Burdick, Los Angeles 

ciation and found the subject so popular that in a 
few hours the newspapermen had raised an enter- 
tainment fund of $2,000 and are continuing at work 
on it with the intention of making it $5,000. 

There are 113 members of the American Press 
Humorists and the organization has grown from a 
half dozen wits who banded together in Baltimore, 
five years ago. Henry Edward Warner, leading 
spirit for organization, was the first president. A 
former Los Angeles writer of humor — Strickland 
W. Gillilan, famous for his classic "Finnigan to 
Flannigan", was president the following year, when 
the convention was held at the St. Louis World's 




S. W. Gillilan, Dixon, III 

Fair, and W. R. Rose of the Cleveland Plain Dealer 
was chosen president in 11:05. when the particular 
convention was noted for the fact that its members 
were guests of John D. Rockefeller at Forest Hill. 
Last year, in Philadelphia, Thomas Augustine Daly 



of the Catholic Standard and Times was chosen 

president ami. in spite of the opposition of four 
of the leading cities of the country, l.o- Angeles 
was selected, unanimously, for the place of holding 
the fifth annual "jokefest". 

For various reasons Los Angeles should give the 
local membership of the American Press Humorists 




P. E. Kisbr, Chicago Record-Herald 

the heartiest support in entertaining the visiting 
writers. Aside from the Nye monument project 
and the fact that Los Angeles has the largest repre- 
sentation in the association of any city except New 
York, there is the significant fact that the humorists 
nearly all are graduates from routine newspaper- 
dom — the star writers on their respective papers — 
and not only do they represent newspapers and 
magazines but all the press associations and news- 
paper syndicates of consequence, so that the total 
membership actually writes for more than 1,700 
publications. 

The humorists of Los Angeles who belong to 
and who are assisting the secretary-treasurer in 
making convention arrangements are John S. Mc- 
Groarty and Harry C. Carr, of the Times; Arthur 
J. Burdick, of the News; John B. Elliott, of the 




James Barton Adajis, Denver, Colo. 

Associated Press: the Rev. Dr. Robert J. Burdette 
and Robert J. Burdette, Jr.: W. H. Cline, and J. C. 
Stuart. Other California members are Winfield 
Hogaboom, of San Pedro ; Alfred J. Waterhouse, of 
Sacramento, and Lowell Otus Reese of Alta. 

It is rumored that Mark Twain, may be persuaded 
to make the trip across the continent, although he 
has announced that something unusual must be 
offered as an inducement for a "land voyage" of 
any length. The possibility is rather promising, 
however, as a trip to Reno and other points in Ne- 
vada, as well as a tour of northern California points 
associated with his early work is offered as a tempt- 
ing lure to the much-loved author, the most famous 
humorist of bis time. 



12 



Pacific Outlook 



HARD LUCft 



By Lanibr Bartwstt 



"Wal, what d' you expect of Rube, anyhow? You 
know he's been jest about loco since that time. The 
worst thing on earth a man can do is t' take a 
woman, honest. Love wer'n't made fer cow 
countries." 

These terse remarks were drawn from Shanks by 
previous observations by his partner Tex, to the 
effect that "Rube sure wer'n't no genuyne puncher 
no more, carrying on like he does. Why," Tex 
had concluded, as he had kicked his pony savagely 
in the ribs for trying to bite him, "we can't bring 
a drive in half a day's ride of his old man's ranch 
here, but he lays down the law that we must make 
the night's bunk at the house, so he can see 'if 
there's any mail,' and kiss that girl sister of hissen. 
Now, what d'ye think of that, eh?" 

"Wal, any o' us'd like t' do that last business," 
returned Shanks, without the shadow of a doubt in 
his voice. "Besides, its powerful good grubbin' 
here t' the old man's. Old woman cooks bully." 

"Aw, 'taint professional t' be babying 'round 
'bout mail, and clobberin' over gal sisters," main- 
tained Tex, with a disgusted jerk of his closely 
cropped, cocoanut-like head. "Look at them times 
we rode with Rube over in New Mex — who'd ever 
thought then that he'd show soapiness? 'Tain't t' 
my liking." Then he added, in a more cheerful 
tone, "Now, course, 'bout the grubbin,' that's dif- 
ferent." 

"Wal," argued Shanks — a quieter man, but just 
as stubborn — "we ain't never exactly been in the 
boy's fix. It's one of them fixes what it's jest one 
man's business, an' he's the man that's fixed. Sure 
'nough, you wouldn't have thought it could happen 
t' Rube — Lord no! — but it did; an' I claim, he's kept 
that cavortin' bunch o' trouble pretty well rounded 
up. He aint let it get away and bother nobody 
else. It's natural 'nough he wants t' hear 'bout that 
woman if he can ; she was some spuds t' him while 
she lasted. You see, Tex, he can't quite ride that 
sorrow yet, fer them things ain't easy broke. It's 
jest as. I was asayin', the worst thing on this earth 
a man can do is to take a woman. Of course, 
they're all right for a day or two, off and on — but 
t' really claim one, I mean, an' put your own brand 
on her." 

"That's jest 'bout what the women round these 
parts say 'bout takin' a man," remarked Tex, dryly. 

"Wal," persisted Shanks, "it jest proves what I 
was asayin', love wer'n't made fer cow countries." 

"Aw, you're loco too, Shanks," ventured Tex, 
conclusively, and both fell into silence. 

The two cowboys — Shanks, long, bony and 
powerful ; Tex, short, bow-legged and pugnacious 
looking — were unsaddling their tired mounts in 
"Old Brown's" corral after a fifty mile drive up 
from the south, with still a hundred more between 
them and their destination, the raiiroad. The cattle 
— the bunch was small this trip — were crowding 
and fighting about the long water trough, for they 
had not wet their lolling tongues since dawn. 

Their horses watered and fed. Shanks and Tex 
shambled down the path toward the house, a little 
lower in the canon, their heavy leather "chaps" 
swishing and spurs clankinp- at each heavy, lurching; 
footfall. 



The frail frame house — an awkward, two-story 
affair — nestled under the rocky brow of the creek 
bank, and its flimsy door was never closed against 
any human being who chanced to pass that way. 
For in the wilderness the inviolate sign of the 
Brotherhood of Man is a request for drink and food 
and shelter. In the world's crowded places the 
Brotherhood of Man is no longer recognized, and 
its sign condemns, as the mark of beggary; but Old 
Brown's was far from any such place. No cowboy, 
driving northward with his bunch of cattle and 
cloud of dust, ever failed to give thanks when the 
Arizona night overtook him within reach of the 
ranch in the dry creek mouth ; though Tex, the 
scornful, always growled when an hour was 
squandered in making the detour. 

But this had been a very hot afternoon, and the 
night would be brilliant in its early part from a new 
moon. So they had decided to try the unwise thing 
of driving by night. 

/Rube had left his tired horse saddled and bridled 
without so much as turning him into the corral, 
and had preceded his companions to the house. It 
was this that had called forth the accusations 
brought against him by Tex. 

********* 

"Where's Rube?" asked Tex, as they drew up to 
the oilclothed table in the kitchen for supper. 

"Whar's the gal?" asked Shanks almost at the 
same moment. 

"Oh, the boy's some 'ers in the front of the 
house. He's got a letter what's been a-layin' 
'round some time fer him," answered the woman of 
the house, a lean, matter-of-fact, harsh-voiced per- 
son, who busied herself at the stove while the men 
clattered the "grub" into their mouths. 

"Must have been 'spectin' it, way he shook us," 
muttered Tex, loading up with ham. 

"No, guess not," said the woman, "jest sort of 
thought he had a chance fer one, prob'ly. He's 
been away a sight of a while this trip. An' the gal, 
she's 'round some 'ers. Jennie!" she called. 

After a moment a girl appeared in the inner door- 
way; a girl of perhaps twenty years, of perhaps 
more, or even less. It was hard to tell because her 
wan face disclosed an inward reflection peculiarly 
spiritual, while outwardly it was distinctly marked 
by the commonplace and the starkly material, and 
by hopeless disappointment. She was tall and 
graceful by nature, but worn and thin by hard ranch 
work. Her large black eyes were full of sullen 
timidity as she faced the men, and she held her 
flowing black hair back from her face with one hand 
behind her head, as if taken in the midst of her 
toilet, and ashamed. 

She looked inquiringly at her mother. Shanks 
watched her in open admiration over the rim of his 
coffee bowl as he drank, his face intrenched behind 
the copious vessel as if seeking protection from 
any glance that might chance to escape in his di- 
rection from her smoldering eyes. 

Tex loaded another chunk of ham onto his plate 
without looking up. 

"Jennie, go call the boy t' supper," commanded 
the woman. 

A shadow, as of sorrow, passed over the girl's 



Pacific Outlook 



13 



tired l>m beautiful face ;i-. without a word, she 
turned awaj and closed tin- door behind her. 

"The gal's awful sympathizin' with the boy — 
sort of sees into him further than I can. though I'm 
his mother," said the woman as she at last seated 
herself at the table. There was a suggestion of 
awe in her voice. "I do believe she's a sent of a 
crazy seeress — ain't that what they call them 
things? Kind of sees ahead to troubles that ain't 
arrove yet." 

"Wish I had a sister like that." exclaimed 
Shanks, referring to the phvsical girl rather than 
to the awesome qualities just mentioned by the 
mother. 

"Yes, site's a purty fair gal t' work." mumbled 
( >ld Brown, with his mouth full, "hut site ain't jest 
right in the head, y' know." 

The girl tip-toed to the trout room. In the door- 
way she let her tresses fall and stood irresolute. 
"I'd rather leave him alone." she mused, "hut then, 
I see things, people say." She slipped in. 

The sun had not quite set. but drawn shades 
darkened the stiff front room, for it was seldom 
used. In the middle of the floor stood a small 
table, and aeross it Rube hail thrown his arms. In 
tbem his face was hidden. The rickety chair into 
which he had first thrown himself had almost been 
forced from under him by the convulsive movement 
that had brought half of him down onto the table. 
There he clung, motionless, all in a heap, her big, 
sinewy brother — the sunburned, gray-eyed, strong 
featured man, the only man into whose face she 
had ever looked joyously, without any cringing of 
her sensitive soul. He was clad just as when he 
had dismounted, in spurs and fringed leather 
"chaps". His big sombrero, that had been crushed 
back when he had hidden his face in his arms, clung 
to his throat by the chin strap, and concealed his 
head. In a half-closed fist lay a crumpled white 
something, luminous in the gloom. 

The girl crept to her brother's side, and kneeling, 
tried to peep up under his arms to his face. He did 
not move. Then she fell into her old habit of talk- 
ing with herself — the refuge of many a misunder- 
stood soul in lonely environment. The rough, 
simple folk about her thought she was crazy. Ac- 
cording to their standards, she was. But she was a 
pretty good girl to work, so she was seldom crossed 
in her self-communions. 

"It must be the end of the story," she whispered, 
regretfully. 

She reached out and raised the hat brim a bit. 
His hair was wet and clinging. She passed her 
hand gently, soothingly down the length of his bare 
powerful forearm, like a keeper about to remove 
some prize from between the paws of a high-strung 
animal that a single sudden movement may arouse 
to dangerous action, and slowly withdrew the 
crumpled paper from the relaxed fingers. Then she 
smoothed the letter carefully 'on the floor, and bent 
down over it so closely that her face, like his, was 
hidden, as the loose hair fell forward. She puzzled 
long at the beginning as if incredulous. The rest 
she picked from the gloom more rapidly. Suddenly 
she threw her beautiful head back and shuddered, 
as if the meaning of what she had read had just 
then touched the quick of her soul. 

"Poor Rube." she whispered, kissing' his bare 
forearm lightly, with that same cautiousness of 
approach, "he won't want any supper, I guess — 



ever, perhaps." She peeped under the hat brim 
again. The man remained immovable save for the 

heav) breathing that raised and lowered his shoul- 
ders. She settled hack onto her heels as she knell. 

and composed herself as if for a quiet talk with 

some close friend of her heart. She began \>> speak 
to the ceiling in a subdued voice, reflectively, like 
one who is never understood by others, and ponders 
much in quiet, half-lit corners, alone. 

"lie was just a cowboy, like the rest. When he 
moved the horizon moved, so he thought he was 
always in the center of the world, with plenty of 

n 10m. 

"Hut far from here, in the fever of some town, he 
learned to love. He learned it by heart — and here 
he lies. Rube dear?" She twined her arms around 
his neck, under the hat. cautiously. He did not 
seem to feel her. 

"It changed him so!" she whispered, still con- 
fiding in the old leak-stained ceiling. "It was so 
different from the grief of love that I had always 
heard of — everywhere except in story books. He 
turned so gentle, so dream*- so kind to every living 
thing. All the boys said, 'Hell, Rube, don't do it.' 
But he did. And it all came so near being like the 
things I have dreamed, came so near being perfect 
and happv and unreal — still a cowbov. but not like 
the rest ! 

"And then, oh. God, it had to be broken and 
spoiled!" Bitterness filled her, and she sprang to 
her feet with outstretched arms and accused the 
ceiling, then appealed to it — or bevond, to God. 
First her fists were clenched and her whole slight 
being shook; afterward they opened pathetically, 
and the passion left her. She settled to her knees 
again. 

"Yes, it had to be spoiled! Had to be! Had to 
be ! It was too nice. Any of us cow folks might 
have known that. After a big man who could have 
beaten her, worked her to death, cursed her, had 
given up his very soul and loved her with a love 
the vision of which comes to women in dreams; 
aft&r the man had died and been born again, as it 
says in the big Book with the small print — even 
till he kissed his little sister without being 
ashamed — then You, God, whoever You are, had to 
find a way to spoil it! Didn't You? It was too 
good for cow countries, wasn't it? It wasn't 
natural, it was foolish of a cowboy, and when he so 
far forgot that he was a man as really to love, then 
You made the woman do the bad part ! I guess 
there wasn't any other way out of it for You! 

"Hut it was a hard time to do it." She fell from 
the hoarse whisper back into the softer tone. "Why 
couldn't You have done it right awav, before there 
was anything to bury except thoughts?" The white 
fists relaxed, and the girl's spirit seemed suddenly 
to break. 

"His world was all changed, so that he was never 
in the center of it any more except when he was at 
home, and the horizon never moved when he did. 
but just shut down behind him whenever he left 
her. I thought she was so fine and beautiful, but 
all the women folks hereabouts looked at her side- 
ways, saying she was from town, and wouldn't last 
out here so near horizon. I thought it was only 
men that didn't last. 

"I remember, it was the day the twins were born 
that he kissed me for the first time in his life, and 
it made me almost wild with the joy of love myself. 



14 



Pacific Outlook 



Nobody had ever kissed me before, and I had never 
seen a tender man, except in dreams. Rube, you 
loved too much for a man" — the low voice began 
to turn bitter again — "it wasn't natural, and you got 
it square between the eyes for it. Oh, You!" She 
gasped the last in passion, and jumped to her feet, 
and spread her arms wide open after planting a 
blow square between her own eyes. In the gather- 
ing dark the clenched fists seemed to go right up 
through the indistinct patterns in the papered ceil- 
ing. The slender body shook with revolt, with the 
pain of it. "Now strike me, if You dare !" she cried, 
hoarsely. "He's down, now hit me ! Be brave and 
knock a little girl down !" She waited for a moment 
in breathless silence, but no blow fell ; and with the 
snapping of the tension she retreated back onto her 
upturned heels again. But still she fought, slight, 
trembling, unavailing little creature, in the cause 
of the big, brown, disspirited man. 

"The man wouldn't get tired of her, so You made 
the woman do it. Then You killed the twins right 
in his arms — in these great, strong arms that could 
check the wildest beast on any range, but were 
powerless to hold two tiny girl lives in their grasp. 
Now, wasn't that fine? Oh, You skinned him alive, 
that's what You did, You — " She choked, and the 
gathering rage within her jerked her to her feet, 
and flung her fists at the ceiling again, and wracked 
her ; and she bit into the dark. 

Suddenly she relaxed and took in a deep breath, 
remembering she had burst without bringing the 
final indictment. She seemed to take no thought 
that the crumpled man might be suffering unutter- 
ably under her rehearsal. 

"And — it — was," she began slowly, measuring out 
the terrible words to the ceiling with an inexorable 
forefinger — 

"Well, well, what was it, gal?" came a harsh but 
half tolerant feminine voice from the doorway, 
where the mother hustled in. 

"It was Rube's old pardner. Hi, that was chosen 
to do him up," she proclaimed, turning upon the 
figure outlined against the hall light, without any 
sign of surprise at the interruption. "She wrote 
Rube this just before she died, out on the Coast. 
She says to forget it, and never let the twins 
know.". 

The man groaned for the first time. The girl 
withdrew, in a startled way, the luminous bit of 
paper which she had held out toward the new- 
comer, and seemed to shrink — actually to grow 
smaller, and cold, in the gloom — as the spirit that 
had flared within her blew down to a mere flicker, 
and soon blew out, in the sudden cold draught of 
the other's presence. 

"But what do you care, old woman Brown," she 
demanded, resentfully, in a hollow tone, edging 
toward the stricken man as if to shield him from the 
intruder. But more and more the woman's presence 
oppressed her, halted her, quelled her, and before 
she could reach his side she had sunk into her old 
resigned, sullen attitude of waiting to be ordered. 
Her sensitive, repressed soul had been perfectly 
attuned to the spiritual state of the suffering man 
there in the illusionary dark. The other presence 
broke the plaintive spell as a jarring inharmony 
ruins a dream-uttered minor melody. 

"Go on now. gal, and wash them dishes. Lord 
knows you ain't good fer much else," ordered the 



' 'Largest and Finest Stock of Furniture in the West' ' 

S TRE1T MORRIS CHAIRS 

A J\ Are the climax of perfection in Morris chair construction. They 
CW embody all the advantages of rest and comfort found in other 
Morris chairs and give you the added advantages of the Streit 
patent foot rest found in no other make. For workmanship and finish 
they are unsurpassed. We have a large line now ready for your in- 
spection. 

[Furniture do. 1 

!aS.„ 640-646 SOUTH HILL ST. " 



May L. Evans and Vera E. Herrmann 

Public Stenographers 
Notaries Public .... 

Appointments can be made for Evening or Sunday Work 



Pho 



(Home F 6904 
s (Main 5154 



CONVENIENT TO ALL PRINCIPAL HOTELS 
Opposite Angelus, one block from Van Nuys, one block from Alexan- 
dria, one block from Westminster, in the center 
of the business district 

Suite Four Hundred and Ten Union Trust Building 




Pure Air is Curing 

Consumption 



In diseases of the Lungs, Heart and Kidneys, you 
need more oxygen than you are getting. Pure air 
without dangerous drafts, secured by sleeping in the 
cottage built for health. 

■WALKER PORTABLE COTTAGE 
On exhibition, rear 420 W. 6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 




Shaving Outfits, Pocket and 
Table Knives, Corkscrews, 
Manicure Goods, Silverware, 
Scissors, Shears, Cutlery 
Specialties and Novelties. 
We grind all kinds of Cutlery 
and do it well 

Otto Steinen Supply Co. 

210 W. Third St. Los Angeles 



PHONE HOME A 4432 
4TH ST. Store 



F 7671; MAIN 4604 
Spring St. Store 



GERMAN DELICATESSEN AND FRUHSTUCK STUBEN 

FINEST AND LARGEST ASSORTMENT 

OF TABLE LUXURIES 

328 W. 4TH ST. 517 S. SPRING ST 



Pacific Outlook 



15 



an, still harshly, but still half tolerantly, 
perhaps pityingly. "Rube seems t' be gettin' as 
crazy as you be." 

lust before she reached the door on her way out 
the girl backed up against the wall, like some crea- 
ture at hay. ami called across tlu- gloom iii a defiant 
voice, as it' determined to saj it even though nobody 
understand her ami the usual rebuke interrupt her: 
"(let on again, Rube, ami stay with it. and perhaps 

when you get < Her There where there ar'n't any cow 
countries you can square it with Clod like a man. 
face to face, and have all three of 'cm hack." 

After that she slouched sullenly past the woman, 
and went to washing the dishes. As the thin little 
figure, all the fire gone out of it now. slaved out 
into the light, the man raised his face. His jaw- 
stiffened from its hang of gaunt despair, and set 
nervilv. squaring his face. 

"Thanks. Jennie." he said, quietly, gratefully. 

Tex suddenly thundered on the outer door. 
"Wake Up in there. Rube, you big. lazy baby," he 
bawled. "We've got t' git out o' this!" 

"Now. don't be too hard on the boy. Tex.'' rea- 
soned Shanks, as the two clanked away for their 
ponies. "You don't know much, anyhow." 

Rube walked out of the room with a firm step. 
and went silently driving with the rest down into 
the moonlit night. 

The Twins' Dell — as the Coyote Creek punchers 
call it. wdiere Rube gave up the last of all he had 
had. into one hole — lies to the northward of old 
Brown's, nowhere near a habitation. Things are 
not crowded together in the wilderness. 

"We've got t' ride that way," called Shanks to 
Tex, in a low r tone, after while " 'Tain't nice by 
moonlight, neither, somehow." 

"No, 'tain't," admitted Tex, "but can't be helped 
— must take the short cut." 

"Wal," mused Shanks, after another interval, 
" 'tain't no wonder the boy's kinder loco. It's jest 
as I was asayin', love wer'n't made fer cow coun- 
tries. Tex." 

" 'Tain't jest jolly fer him." Tex confessed, after a 
moment's thought, "but it's a fact. Shanks, the 
gooder you are the badder you'll feel, sooner or later. 
An' as fer my belief, 'tain't a bit of use cussin' the 
Boss 'bout them things, like some folks do. Of 
course, there's some fellers that seems knocked 
clean out, that'll git up and git on again and ride 
the same old thing to death, jest from the fight 
that's in 'em. But any job's liable t' quit a puncher 
sudden in these parts: an' when it does' it's jest 
hard luck, that's all. There's al'lus other ranches. 

"You mean ladies?" inquired Shanks. 

"Yep, that's what it stands fer in this conversa- 
tion." 

"But they's all run by the same Boss," objected 
Shanks, dubiously. 

"Yep, but all on different plans and under dif- 
ferent conditions. Shanks. An' when there's a bad 
season strikes the one you've signed with, there 
ain't nothing personal 'bout it; it's jest hard luck, 
that's all." 

"Wal, Tex. a man sometimes values a job a heap 
more than you'd think, speakin' o' these peculiar 
sort o' ranches you named, an' fer my belief, he's 
mighty liable t' feel like layin' fer the Big Boss the 
rest o' his life. An' there's a heap o' satisfaction — 



sometimes reg'lar salvation — in the fightin' spirit," 
declared Shanks, decisively. 

' 'Tain't game t' tight over hard luck." main- 
tained Tex, in a tone that precluded further argu- 
ment; and the two. like the third, fell into deep 
thi night. 





Home 4297: Main 5193 



Fine Floors 

For 

Fine Houses 

We put down all kinds 
of Plain, Parquet and 
ornamental Wood Floors. 
Old Floors renovated. 

Co-Operative 
Hardwood Floor Co. 

215 Mercantile Place 




Beach and Mountains 

Ovir Lines Reach BotK 

For a Restful Outing at High 
Altitudes 



Visit Mount Lowe 

P'or your Summer Vacation arrange to spend part of the 

season at Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Newport 

YOU GET IDEAL TROLLEY SERVICE 

THE PACIFIC ELECTRIC RY. 



If YOU want, the BEST 



a^ ar> 



PIER.CE ®> CO. 



KODAK FINISHING 

...GO TO... 

127 W. 6th St, 



Pacific Outlook 

TUBLRCULOSIS--A SOCIAL PROBLEM 



Laity SHo-uTd Assist in Stamping' Out Disease 



By J. Perkins M. D., in August "Out Door Life'' 



There is no other single subject in either medicine 
or sociology which is occupying so important a 
place to-day as does tuberculosis. In the world 
at large there are over 1,000,000 deaths each year 
from tuberculosis. The United States alone con- 
tribute upwards of 150,000, while Rhode Island, the 
smallest State in the Union, contributes over 1,000. 
Most of these deaths occur during the years of 
man's greatest activity and greatest value to the 
community, the greatest majority occurring be- 
tween the ages of 25 and 40 years. This is surely 
enough to demand attention, but it is not all. The 
progress of the disease is a slow one. It is esti- 
mated that, as an average, a tuberculous person is 
incapacitated for active work an average of 300 
day before death occurs, during which time he is 
not only a non-producer but a consumer. Taking 
the estimated average wage of one dollar a day and 
the cost of his maintenance and care as $1.50 ad- 
ditional, we find that even, in Rhode Island, with a 
death rate of 1,000 per year, we have an actual loss 
of $750,000 for those who are incapacitated, to say 
nothing of the loss of the wages of subsequent years 
of these individuals' who die in the prime of their 
activity. In addition to this, there are the widows 
and orphans left without the companionship and 
care which is rightfully theirs. 

The expense of running our charitable institu- 
tions is largely increased because of the dependents 
left by those dying of tuberculosis as well as by the 
care of the tuberculous themselves. This is suffi- 
cient to show why this subject is receiving so much 
attention. These facts are nothing new, and have 
in one form or another been stated thousands of 
times, the only new thing being that the public is 
beginning to realize that they are facts and not fic- 
tion, and to appreciate what they mean. 

Tuberculosis is a disease of the masses, and while 
— as some one has said— none but the rich have any 
right to have tuberculosis, right does not prevail, 
and nearly all the cases are among the poor. To 
appreciate what this means you should hear the 
reports of the District Nurse who visits the tuber- 
culous poor. Thep present a tale of misery and 
want which is equaled by no other charitable work. 

The diease — tuberculosis — has been known since 
the very earliest days of medicine. It received its 
name because it is usually characterized by the form- 
ation in the diseased part of small masses, or 
tubercles. It was recognized as contagious two or 
three centuries ago. Some of the most drastic laws 
that have ever been enacted in reference, to an)' 
disease were in force in Naples as far back as 1782, 
but the real cause of the disease, though for many 
years suspected, was not known until 1882, when a 
then country physician in Germany — Robert Koch 
— demonstrated the tubercle bacillus, and proved 
by the inoculation of pure cultures of this bacillus 
into susceptible animals that he could always pro- 
duce the disease — tuberculosis— and further proved 
that this bacillus is always present in the disease 
tuberculosis, and that in most cases of pulmonary 
tuberculosis these bacilli are expectorated in large 



numbers for some time before death. While efforts 
had previously been made to prevent the spread of 
the disease, the work was largely done in the dark 
because of ignorance as to its exact cause. 

Since 1882 the dissemination of the knowledge as 
to the exact methods of its spread has taken place, 
gradually a first, rapidly of late. 

As stated, the tubercle bacillus is always present 
in the disease — tuberculosis — and the disease can 
never be present without the bacillus. Upon this 
fact is founded most of the work which has recently- 
been done for the purpose of limiting the spread of 
the disease. 

There are, however, many other factors which 
must be considered, and much of the limitation of 
the spread of the disease — tuberculosis — is due to 
other things than those aimed directly at tubercu- 
losis. For instance, the death rate from this disease 
began to diminish at about the year 1850 and has 
steadily diminished since then. This is nearly co- 
incident with' the development of public sanitation, 
though the decrease has been much more rapid 
since the discovery of the tubercle bacillus and the 
establishment of sanatoriums and hospitals for the 
treatment of the disease. 

In the popular mind tuberculosis is always as- 
sociated with disease of the lungs, pulmonary tuber- 
culosis, or, as it is popularly known, consumption. 
As a matter of fact, however, .there is no part of 
the body which escapes infection ; and even when 
pulmonary tuberculosis, or consumption, is the di- 
rect cause of death, some other part of the body is 
frequently diseased, the lungs becoming second- 
arily infected. Thus we have tuberculosis of the 
brain, called meningitis ; tuberculosis of the lymph 
glands, often called scrofula ; tuberculosis of the 
throat, of the kidneys, of the intestines, of the 
abdominal cavity, and of the bones and joints. Hip 
disease in children is practically always tubercu- 
losis. In fact, in children the death rate from tuber- 
culosis is high, but is almost always of some part of 
the body other than the lungs. 

Nor are the ravages of the tubercle bacillus lim- 
ited to the human body. Tuberculosis is a disease 
common to many animals. The domestic animals 
most frequently affected by it are cattle, hogs and 
hens. The bacillus as found in hens is, in its origin 
or by development, of a sufficiently different type 
from that found in man to present no danger to 
mankind. It has been claimed by many that the 
bacillus as found in cattle, especially in the milk of 
cows, is also harmless to man. This, however, is 
proven not to be true, for, while the bacillus as 
found in cattle does in its growth present variations 
from that usually found in mankind, it has been 
demonstrated that it can and does produce tubercu- 
losis in the human body, especially in children, and 
probably its variations from that found in the hu- 
man bodv are due to differences in the soil in which 
it grows, and that by transmission through the 
human body it can again take on the form usually 
found in human beings. 

It is a fact, however, that the chief source of dan- 



Pacific Outlook 



ger i> from htlman beings. The bacilli are found 
wherever there is a breaking down or throwing ofl 
of diseased tuberculous tissue, whether in the sup: 
puration from a case of tuberculosis of thejungs 
or tin- pus.from a suppurating gland, as scroiulous 
glands of the neck. It all of the material thus thrown 
ofl could be destroyed there would be very little 
danger of contracting the disease, as bj means ol 
these secret ions tuberculosis is usually conveyed 
from one person to another. At present tuberculous 
persons are in all too many instances expectorating 
promiscuously in our street c:,rs. steam cars, work- 
shops and places of public meetings, where the 
sputum i> SOOn dried, and the bacilli Ret into the air 
we breathe in the form of dust. 

rtunately, a prolonged exposure to light and ait 
-o diminishes the virulence of the bacilli that after 
such an exposure they are not as dangerous as 
when first expectorated. In dark or damp rooms, 
or when wrapped in handkerchiefs or bed clothing, 
they retain their virulence much longer, and for this 
reason there is much greater danger from careless 
expectoration in houses and workshops than upon 
the streets. Another source of danger is the spray 
which tlies from the mouth wdtile coughing or sneez- 
ing, for which reason a tuberculous person should 
always cover his mouth when coughing. 

The spread of disease in this way is, however, not 
a peculiarity of tuberculosis, for influenza, pneu- 
monia and the so-called common colds, as well as 
probably other diseases, are spread in the same way. 
To appreciate the amount of spray thrown off in 
coughing, you have but to cough in close proximity 
to a mirror and see the deposit formed. The breath 
of a tuberculous person, or his presence, if the ex- 
pectoration is properly cared for, is not dangerous. 
Thus, one of the most important things we have to 
do in limiting the spread of tuberculosis is to pro- 
perly educate all persons, and this is one of the 
objects of our League for the Suppression of Tuber- 
culosis in Providence, and is one of the chief bene- 
fits of our State Sanatorium and of hospitals for 
the care of the tuberculous; for, if all the tubercu- 
lous material could be destroyed, the disease could 
be controlled. This, however, is at present impos- 
sible, and we have to work on the subject from 
other points of view. 

The bacillus tuberculosis is a parasite, and its 
growth depends upon two things — the vitality of 
the bacillus and the character of the soil in which 
it finds its lodgement. There are probably none 
of us who do not at some time have tubercle bacilli 
in our bodies, but not a'l of us develop tuberculosis. 
If our vitality is greater than that of the parasite it 
does no harm. Our country is one in which it is 
going to be peculiarly difficult to stamp out tuber- 
culosis, and the warfare which has been begun 
against the disease will have to be a continued one. 

The death rate from tuberculosis is quite large 
in country districts, but there it is because when 
tuberculosis once gets into a family, the methods of 
living are such that several members of a family 
become infected from the first case, and education 
should be able to largely obliterate it in the c'ountry 
districts. 

In the cities the immigrants are so poor, so hud- 
dled together in their houses, so badly nourished 
from poor and insufficient food, and they work in 
such unsanitary places that the problem of dealing 
with them is a large one. The work of stamping 




HERE 

You will find the most exclusive patterns in Im- 
ported French Flannels for Summer Suitings — the 



kind worn by stylish dressers, 
yourself. 



Call and see for 




TSae GeEatlesmeia's laaj 
314 WEST THIRD STREET 




BETWEEN 

..California ?he East. 

There's no Better Way than the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 

'Tis the Scenic Short-line between Los Angeles and Salt 
Lake City and the Train Service is Excellent. 

No Finer Train Exists than the Los Angeles Limited — 
Solid between Chicago and Los Angeles. Try it. 

Fait Particulars at 601 South Spring St. 



BOOKSBOIGHT 

HOLMES BOOK CO. 

333 SO. MAIN ST. 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1855 



18 



Pacific Outlook 



out tuberculosis is today no more that of the medi- 
cal profession than of the laity, for there is no 
aspect of life that is not involved. It is more a 
sociological than a medical question. Physicians 
should lead the way, but a large part of the work 
must of necessity fall upon the laity, and they 
should not hesitate to accept their obligations, for 
the pecuniary loss, which has been stated, is the 
loss of the whole State. 

Were tuberculosis stamped out there would be a 
marked diminution in the appropriations needed 
for charitable purposes. Our cities' poor departments 
would be relieved of a great financial burden as 
well as of much work. Many of the inmates of our 
State almshouses are there because they, or those 
who provided for them, have or have had tubercu- 
losis. Our hospitals would be relieved of a great 
burden, as many of the cases there treated — when 
not due to pulmonary tuberculosis itself — are due 
to the tubercle bacillus acting elsewhere than in 
the lungs, especially tubercular diseases of the 
bones and joints. Our orphan asylums would have 
fewer applicant for admission and our local charit- 
able organizations would be relieved of an immense 
burden. 

iThe tubercle bacillus is the direct cause of tuber- 
culosis, but a lessened vitality of the body furnishes 
the soil which the bacillus must have in order to 
do its work. 

The employers of labor have many times been 
told, but in a large measure have apparently yet to 
learn, that both the quality and the quantity of 
work done by their employes depends upon their 
vitality. When they do learn this, as some have 
already done, one of the prominent causes of tuber- 
culosis — improper heating and insufficient ventila- 
tion — will become less marked, because of their 
own pecuniary interests as well as for the interests 
of the employes. 

Intemperance is one of the prominent causes of 
tuberculosis, and intemperance is not wholly a vice. 
The craving for some stimulant is often simply the 
effect of the condition under which one lives or 
works. This craving is fostered by overwork, or by 
any work under poor conditions. It is a cry of the 
body for something to make it feel natural, and one 
of the best ways to promote temperance and to re- 
move this great cause of tuberculosis is to improve 
the conditions under which the poor work and live, 
and to teach them how they can obtain the best 
nourishment possible from the money which they 
have to expend. 

Thus we see that while the medical profession 
has to deal with the subject of tuberculosis medical- 
ly and to teach others how it should be dealt with 
socially, it must have the assistance of all those who 
have to do with any part of the work or life of 
working people, such as factory owners, factory 
inspectors, tenement house owners, jewelry manu- 
facturies, deoartment stores, school committees and 
teachers, park commissions, workingmen's clubs 
and all educational and charitable societies. 

The outcome of the disease — tuberculosis — when 
once it is present depends upon the relative vitality 
of the parasite — the tubercle bacillus — and its host, 
the human body. The question of curing the dis- 
ease is thus purely a biological one. Can the host 
have its vitality sufficiently raised to kill the para- 
site? In demonstrating that this in many cases can 
be done, the credit belongs largely to three men, two 




Your Household Goods Moved, 
Stored or Shipped at. Reduced 
Kates .... 

140 S. BROADWAY 



Main 19 



Get, a City Map Free Home Ex. 19 



GERMAN AMERICAN 
S^INCS4_BANK 




The building of a 
Bank Account is 
not difficult if the 
"builder" is persist- 
ent. 



This Bank is the medium through which over 20,000 
people are saving money. <J Bear in mind that the German- 
American Savings Bank has the largest Capital and Surplus 
of any Savings Bank in Los Angeles. IJ Resources over 
$ 1 0,000,000. Four per cent on deposits. 

(Sfrman-Anwriran g>amwgs lank 

223 South Spring St. Branch: Main and First. Sts. 



You Have a Mind 
of Your Own . . . 



When you once make up your mind that 
you want a certain article advertised in the 
PACIFIC OUTLOOK and you decide to 
buy it, do not be sidetracked by any "Just 
as Good" talk that may be given you. First 
class dealers give you what you ask for. 

The PACIFIC OUTLOOK accepts only 
the advertisements of reliable firms — buy of 
them and prove by your own experience 
that the article advertised is what the re- 
putable merchant claims. BUY ADVER- 
TISED GOODS— BUY OF THE ADVER- 
TISER. 



Pacific Outlook 



lit 



tans and an American. The tirM of these was 
Brehmer, whose teachings were scoffed at, hut 
whose practical demonstration bv curing patients 
at his sanatorium at Goerbersdorf was accepted. 
Following him. hi> student and house physician, 
Dettweihler, established a sanatorium at Falken- 
stein and produced results eoual to those of his 
master. 

The lir-t to accept these teachings in America 
was Dr. Trudeau, who, himself tuberculous, went 
to the Airondacks, contrary to the advice of other 
physicians, lived the life taught bj these two Ger- 
mans, sufficiently recovered from the disease to do 
active work, established the Adirondack Cottage 
Sanitarium — the foremost institution of its kind in 
America — and by his skill and personality has dur- 
ing the subsequent thirty years attained and main- 
tained the leading place in the medical profession 
of America in the combat against tuberculosis. 

The treatment has been successful, though its 
nature and simplicity have made it by many hard 
to accept. It is not a treatment for those who are 
looking' for the marvelous, as there is nothing of 
mysticism or the supernatural about it. It consists 
in raising the vitality of the body by nature's own 
remedies — fresh air. excellent nourishment and rest 
or properly superintended exercise. It was former- 
ly considered that some special climate was neces- 
sary for the cure of tuberculosis, but we now know 
that it is the manner of life, and not the place in 
which that life is spent, which determines succcess 
or failure. Some climates are more favorable for 
cure than others, but there is no climate in which a 
person can maintain health in which he cannot re- 
cover from this disease with a proper manner of life 
The percentage of cures, however, depends upon 
how earlv treatment is undertaken and the fidelity 
with which it is carried out. 

Proper medical guidance and the treating of com- 
plications which arise are indispensable to success 
in the majority of cases. Medicines help by remov- 
ing complicaions which arise, but there is no medi- 
cine which is a specific against the disease. All that 
are advertised as such are fakes, pure and simple. 

* * * 

Mining' Exchang'e Organized 
Permanent organization of the Los Angeles- 
Nevada Mining Stock Exchange was effected Mon- 
day night at a meeting held at the Alexandria Hotel. 
The exchange has a membership of 150 from whom 
monthly dues of $10 will be collected. Quarters on 
the ground floor of the Hellman building are being 
sought. The following are officers of the new or- 
ganization: M. J. Monnette, president; A. C. Har- 
per, first vice-president : J. L. Boyle, second vice- 
president : F. I. Herron, secretary, and Captain H. 
'/.. Osborne, treasurer. 

* * * 
Good Story- Coming' 

Dear little Maudie awoke about two o'clock the 
other morning and asked mama to tell her a fairy 
tale. "It's too late, darling," mama replied. "Daddy 
will be in shortly, and he'll tell us both one." — 
Philadelphia Inquirer. 

* * * 

"What's the difference between vision and sight?" 
"See those two girls across the street?" "Yes." 
"Well, the pretty one I would call a vision, but the 
other one— she's a sight." — Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



A GOLD MINE 

Onl-» 22 Miles from Los Angeles 

A new mining district has been opened in the 
mountains near Fernando in the County of Los 
Angeles. 

The Princess Gold Mining & Milling Company has 
established a camp and is in active operation install- 
ing a plant for the reduction of ore found in vast and 
paying quantities on its properties. Work of reduc- 
tion will soon begin. 

The assay values average $14.00 per ton. Cost of 
mining and milling will be $1.00 per ton, with milling 
capacity of 100 tons per day. 

A limited amount of treasury stock now on sale at 
50 cents per share, par value $1.00, non-assessable. 

Price will go to par as soon as the mill is in opera- 
tion. 

Go see the mine and works. It is only two hours 
ride distant by car or motor. 

For further and full particulars call or write us, 
PRINCESS GOLD MINING & MILLING COM- 
PANY, 310-311-312 Mason Opera House Bldg., Los 
Angeles, Cal. 

Metropolitan Bank & Trust Company, Depository 



Special Rates to Yosemite 



DURING AUGUST 



ROUND <£ 1 2.00 T Rl P 

$12.00 From Merced, Cal. $12.00 

via 

Yosemite Valley Railroad 

During August io-day round trip tickets from Mer- 
ced, Cal., to the Hotel and Camps in Yosemite, via 
the Yosemite Valley Railroad, will cost you only 
$12.00, about one-third the stage fare of past years. 
A quick, comfortable trip of unequalled scenic beau- 
ty, through the picturesque Merced River Canyon. 
Th snowclad peaks, majestic waterfalls and waving 
pine forests of Wonderland await you. Fine trout 
fishing in the Canyon and Valley. Daily train from 
Merced at 2:30 p. m. 

See H. H. Vincent, 553 So. Spring St., Los Angeles, 

Or write O. W. Lehmer, Traffic Manager, 

Merced, Cal. 



r 



Established 1887 



iJK 



onradi 



A. new line of diamonds, crosses 
broaches, etc. just received. 
^"» Ash to see the E. Howard watch 

Our Optical Department is in charge of Dr. C. H. Heard 

S. CONRADI COMPANY, Jewelers 

203-205 S. SPRING ST. Los Angeles. Cal. 



MAC DONALD'S HAMMING COLLEGE WantcaV - 

' Women 
Students 




MacDonald, 204 Mercantile Place 

Los Ahseles, Cal. Upstairs near Spring St. 



Pacific Outlook 



MAN'S MOST DEVOTED FRIEND 



A rather unusual feature of dog shows will char- 
acterize the first annual event of the Venice of 
America Kennel Club this month. This will be 
the awarding of prizes solely on the merits of the 
contestants, regardless of pedigrees. A person hav- 
ing a grandfatherless canine is just as apt to get a 
prize for him as is the owner of the bluest-blooded 
stock in America, provided, of course, his animal 
shows the right points. Irving C. Ackerman of 
San Francisco has been selected to decide upon 
the merits of most of the classes, George L. Waring 
will award the ribbons and trophies, John P. Brown 
will decide on the pointers, setters and dogs of 
similar classes and L. W. Young will look after the 
bulls and terriers. G. S. Haliwell will superintend 
the show. Entries will be received by the secretary, 




Pedro, Prize Fox Terrior 
Owned by Mrs. M. H. Galloupe, 1319 Maryland Street 

C. P. Ensign, No. 557 South Spring street. The 
bench show committee of the club consists of J. 
W. Brooks, Kenneth Pruess, Robert T. Cochran 
and Zue G. Peck. Many dogs from Northern Cali- 
fornia, Oregon and Washington will be on exhibi- 
tion. 

Dog is man's best friend among the brutes. At 
least this was the declaration of United States Sen- 
ator George G. Vest of Missouri who, during the 
trial of a man who had shot a fine dog belonging to 
a neighbor, declared, in addressing the jury: 

"The best friend a man has in this world may 
turn against him and become his enemy. His son 
or his daughter that he has reared with loving care 
may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and 



dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happi- 
ness and our good name, may become traitors to 
their faith. The money a man has he may lose. It 
flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it most. 
A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment 
of ill-considered action. The people who are prone 
to fall on their knees to do us honor when success 
is with us may be the first to throw stones of 
malice when failure settles its clouds upon our 
heads. 

"The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man 
can have in this world, the one that never deserts 
him, and the one that never proves ungrateful or 
treacherous, is his dog. Gentlemen of the jury, a 
man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in pov- 
erty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on 
the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and 
the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his 
master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no 
food to offer, he will lick the wounds and sores 
that come in encounter with the roughness of the 
world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master 
as if he were a prince. When all other friends de- 
sert, he remains. When riches take wings and repu- 
tation falls to pieces he is as constant in his love 
as the sun in its journey through the heavens. If 
fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the 
world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog 
asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying 
him to guard against danger, to fight against his 
enemies, and, when the last scene of all comes and 
death takes the master in its embrace, and his body 
is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all 
other friends pursue their way, there by his grave- 
side, will the noble dog be found, his head between 
his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchful- 
ness, faithful and true even to death." 

Lord Byron composed an epitaph on Boatswain, 
his favorite dog, whose death threw the poet into 
the deepest melancholy. Visitors at Newstead are 
still shown Boatswain's grave and the monument 
marked : 

"Near this spot are deposited the remains of one 
that possessed beauty, without vanity, strength, 
without insolence, courage, without ferocity, and all 
the virtues of a man, without his vices. This praise, 
which would be unmeaning flattery if inscribed over 
human ashes, is but a just tribute to the memory 01 
Boatswain, a Dog, who was born in Newfoundland, 
May, 1803, and died at Newstead Abbey, November 
18,1808." 
The inscription concludes with these verses : 
When some proud son of man returns to earth, 
Unknown to glory, but upheld by birth. 
The sculptor's art exhausts the pomp of woe, 
And storied urns record who rests below; 
When all is done, upon the tomb is seen, 
Not what he was, but what he should have been: 
But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend. 
The first to welcome, foremost to defend. 
Whose honest heart is still his master's own, 
Who labors, fights, lives, breathes, for him alone, 
Unhonored falls, unnoticed all his worth, 
Denied in Heaven the soul he held on earth; 
While man, vain insect! 'hopes to be forgiven, 
And' claims himself a sole exclusive heaven. 
Oh, man! thou feeble tenant of an hour, 
Debased by slavery, or corrupt by power, 
Who knows thee well must quit thee with disgust, 
Degraded mass of animated dust! 
Thy love is lust, thy friendship all a cheat, 



Pacific Outlook 



21 



Thy smiles ■ ■■ . thy words deceit) 

By nature vile, ennobled but by name, 

h kindred brute might bid thee blush for shame. 
Vel who perchance behold 1 1 1 i — simple urn. 

ii honors none you wish to mourn; 

mark a friend's remains these stones arise — 
I never knew hut one, and here he lies 

The following verses are- unidentified. They were 
published many years ago in an eastern newspaper 
under the? head "Little Lost Pup": 

He was lostl — not a shade of a doubt of that; 

For he never harked at a slinking cat. 
But stood in the square where the wind blew raw 
With a drooping ear and a trembling paw 

And a mournful look in his pleading eye 

And a plaintive sniff ai the passer-by 

That begged a- plain as a tongue could sue. 
"O. Mister! please may 1 follow you'" 

A lorn wee wait of ;i tawny brown 

Adrift in the roar of a heedless town. 

Oh, the saddest of sights in a world of sin 
Is a little lost pup with his tail tucked in! 

Well, lie won my heart (for I set great store 

On my own red Bute — who is here no more I. 
So I whistled clear, and he trotted up, 
And who so glad as that small lost pup? 

Now- lie shares my board, and he owns my "bed. 

And he fairly shouts when he hears my tread. 
Then, if things go wrong, as they sometimes do. 
And the world i~ cold and I'm feeling blue, 

He asserts his right to assuage my woes 

With a warm, red tongue and a nice, cold nose 
And a silky head on my arm or knee 
And a paw as soft as a paw r can be. 

When we rove the woods for a league about 

He's as full of pranks as a school let out; 

For he romps and frisks like a three-months colt, 
And he runs me down like a thunderbolt. 

Oh, the blithest of sights in the world so fair 

Is a gay little pup with his tail in air! 

The picture on the front cover of this issue of 
the Pacific Outlook is Pat, a famed Boston terrier 
owned by R. Ray Thomas of No. 701 Hobart 
Boulevard. 

* * * 

Baseball Booming in England 

For nearly twenty years all attempts to natural- 
ize lacrosse in England have failed, but baseball 
seems to be now fairly well established and in the 
course of a few years may be expected to spread 
throughout the country. J. Walter Spalding. 
American sportsman, said the other day that he 
thought baseball would surely become a fixture in 
English sports. He went on : 

"Many attempts have been made to introduce the 
game in England, but they have all been failures, 
principally because those who attempted to intro- 
duce the game were all Americans. Last year the 
English football players, with the idea of using 
their idle grounds and keeping their players in 
training, took up the American game with the most 
satisfactory results. 

"The development has been slow but sure. Last 
year a league consisting of six clubs, while it did 
not secure any profit, paid expenses, and at the 
final game 4000 persons were present. This year 
the original league was augmented by two others, 
each of six teams, while various unattached clubs 
bring the total number of teams playing baseball 
about London at present to nearly forty. Teams 
are also being organized at Cardiff and Newcastle 
and elsewhere in the provinces. 

"Everywhere a general healthy growth of Ameri- 
can league rules prevailed and the game the English 



clubs put up will compare favorably with thai of 

the average amateur teams in the United States. 
The excitement of the game is catching on rapidly 
and the crowds have become SO intensely interested 
that is several eases an unsatifaictory decision has 
given rise to shouts of 'Kill the umpire!' 

"That, I think, shows that the American spirit of 

baseball is being inculcated." 

* 9 9 

Expensive Premiums 

The postal authorities are compelling smokers 
who use the mails for the purpose of exchanging 
tags and wrappers coming with tobacco for articles 
offered by the tobacco trust as premiums, to pay 
roundly for the use of the mails for this first-class 
privilege. The Sacramento Bee describes the cam- 
paign for the punishment of these postage dodgers 
as follows : 

"In ninety-nine cases out of a hundred the send- 
ers of the tags do their treasured wrappers up in a 
package, write a little note stating what kind of a 
premium is desired, enclose it in the bundle, and 
mail it to the manufacturing firm, paying only mer- 
chandise rates and forgetting entirely, that Uncle 
Sam demands a first-class postage rate on all let- 
ters, packages, etc., containing written matter, 
which are sent through the mail. 

"For some time post office officials have been un- 
tying all bundles addressed to the various tobacco 
manufacturers and when they find a note enclosed 
with tags and only the merchandise rate paid, they 
address a little communication to the sender, re- 
questing him to forward a fine of $10 or be prose- 
cuted in the United States courts. 

"The local post office has been keeping a strict 
watch and is aiding the government authorities at 
Washington as much as possible. As a rule, the 
offices in this state and on the Pacific coast do not 
open all packages they handle, but permit them to 
go east to the stations where the various tobacco 
manufacturing and premium offering firms are 
situated. 

"At these places special corps of clerks are being 
employed to investigate the contents of every pack- 
age sent to the manufacturers. The bundles are 
opened, the name and address of the sender taken 
and then the packages forwarded on to their in- 
tended -destination. 

" In due time the collector who sent the certificates 
is notified that he owes Uncle Sam $10. The of- 
fender always pays up. 

"Failure to pay always results in a prosecution in 
a United States court. Upon conviction the defen- 
dant is forced to pay a double penalty and all costs 
of the trial." 

* * * 

Different Now 

"I tell you, mum." remarked Sandy Pikes, as he 
dipped up the strawberries and cream, "when you 
are leading the hobo life you have to keep up with 
the times." "Is that so, my poor man?" said the 
sympathetic housewife. "Yes, indeed, mum. why, 
dis time last vear I used to say I came from San 
Francisco, and people used to give me handouts 
'cause they thought I was an earthquake sufferer. 
Now, if I should forget and say I came from San 
Francisco dey would be liable to hand me over to 
de police for being an escaped grafter." — Chicago 
News. 



22 



Pacific Outlook 




SOCIETY 




Reception of Noted Suffragist 

The event of the week which created the most in- 
terest in society was the reception Tuesday after- 
noon given by the Political Equality League in hon- 
or of Mrs. Rachel Foster Avery, first vice-president 
of the National Equal Suffrage Association and one 
of the officers of the international association. The 
Woman's Club House in which the reception was 
held was beautifully decorated with flowers in the 
yellow and white, which are the equal suffrage 
colors. In the receiving line were the officers of 
the Political Equality League, Mrs. Ruddy, the 
president who is in Europe, being the only one 
missed from the group of brilliant women which 
included : Mrs. Julia D. Phelps, vice-president ; Mrs. 
L. A. Robinson, recording secretary; Mrs. O. E. 
Farrish, corresponding secretary, and Mrs. C. A. 




Mrs. Rachael Foster Avery 

Moody, treasurer. Assisting them were Madame 
Caroline M. Severance, Miss Frances Wills, Mrs 
Lulu Pile Little, Mrs. Mary A. Kenny, Mrs. Louise 
S. Janvier, and the presidens of the various women's 
clubs of the city. 

Society women and club women united in giving 
enthusiastic welcome to the famous guest of honor, 
who divided attention with Miss Wilhelmina Sher- 
riff Bain of New Zealand, one of the most distin- 
guished women now identified with world-wide re- 
forms. Mrs. Avery, who is a handsome women 
blessed with a musical voice, made a brief address, 
in which she said much to be remembered. She 
pointed out how far America is behind other coun- 
tries, if one may judge by the political standing of 
the women. Taking as her topic "Woman Suffrage, 



a World Question," she talked with convincing 
earnestness. Touching upon the deliberations of 
various national and international suffrage meet- 
ings, she declared that American women lost their 
best chance of gaining enfranchisement more than 
a hundred years ago when the men of the land won 
their liberty "and if women do not gain liberty with 
the men, they will lose' centuries," she asserted. 
'We must have the suffrage, so that we can mother 
the race. Out here in this new country you are 
allowing abuses, such as child labor, to grow, that 
could be abolished if the women who have the time 
to look after such things, could vote." 

Miss Bain told of conditions in New Zealand 
where, since 1843, the idea of equal suffrage has 
been cherished, although it required fifty years of 
agitation before the franchise was granted in 1893. 
Then a petition signed by 31,000 women, one-third 
of all the women in the country, was presented. In 
speaking of the results of fourteen years of political 
equality in the island province Miss Bain said : 

"As direct results of woman's suffrage, polling 
day has been transformed from riotous disorder to 
Quietude and decorum, and the moral qualifications 
of candidates for representation have been notably 
heightened. In legislation we speak only of indirect 
results, because the right to vote does not yet in- 
clude the right to represent ; though, of course, that 
logical corollary cannot much longer be deferred. 
Womarfs influence, however, is distinctly manifest 
in many enactments for improved conditions, espec- 
ially regarding the aged, the young, the workers 
and the weak.- Our old age pension scheme pro- 
vides that every person who has attained the age 
of 65 years, who is naturalized, with fair moral re- 
cord and twenty-five years' residential qualifica- 
tions, shall, if not otherwise possessed of the means 
of living, receive a yearly amount in monthly pay- 
ments." 

Madame Severance asked twenty of the most ac- 
tive workers for equal suffrage to meet Mrs. Avery 
at her home, No. 806 West Adams street, Wednes- 
day afternoon. Over the tea cups plans for work 
in California were earnestly discussed and it is 
predicted that a campaign more carefully planned 
than any that has been carried on in the history of 
the long struggle for the political equality of Ameri- 
can women will be conducted before the next as- 
sembling of the legislature. In this campaign Mrs. 
Lulu Pile Little, Miss Frances Wills, Mrs. Charles 
Amadon Moody and Mrs. O. E. Farish will be 
among the leaders. 



Marriage of an Editor 

Miss Katherine Thompson, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. J. Thompson, No. 241 East Avenue Forty, 
and John L. Von Blon were married Monday in the 
presence of a few intimate friends. The ceremony 
was performed in Berean Hall, Temple Auditorium, 
by the Rev. Edwin L. Brown. The bride, who is a 
blonde of more than ordinary beauty, was attired 



Pacific Outlook 



23 



in a handsome costume of white silk mulle. She 
wore ;i veil and carried a shower bouquet of white 
carnations. After a fortnight's trip to various re- 
-. Mr. ami Mrs. Von Blon will take possession 
"i" their new home, a Swiss chalet in the hills at 
Highland Park. The bridegroom, who is city edi- 
tor oi the Tillies, is known as one of the best equip- 
ped newspaper men mi the coast. For tun or three 
years the hride ha- been on Mr. Von Blon's local 
and has proved that she has not only a talent 
for journalistic work hut a genius for making 
friends. Mrs. Von Blon belongs to a well known 
Los Vngeles family and i- a favorite in society. 



Bishop Conaty's Farewell 

The Knights of Columbus celebrated the sixtieth 
birthday anniversary of Bishop Conaty last Tues- 
day evening at a reception given in the beautiful 
new club rooms at Twenty-second and Figueroa 
streets. A fine programme was arranged by Charles 
A. King and many splendid tributes were paid to 
the life and work of the prelate. Bishop Conaty 
spoke in his happiest manner and the evening will 
be long remembered by the members of the Los 
Angeles council of the big organization. The 
bishop bade farewell to the hundreds present 'at the 
reception as he started East this week for a long 
visit. 



Frank A. Douglass, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archi- 
bald Douglass and Miss Alcyona Y. Ross were mar- 
ried at Providence, R. I., August 9. Mr. Douglass, 
who is an undergraduate at Yale, had officiated as 
best man at the marriage of his friend, Byron W. 
\\ oodbury of Boston, and his own marriage was 
unpremediated. With his fiancee, who is a popular 
Boston girl, he made a hasty trip to Providence 
where the ceremony was performed. Then tele- 
grams were sent to the relatives of the youthful 
bride and bridegroom. The parents of Mr. Doug- 
lass invited him to bring his bride home and the 
wedding festivities probably will take place in Lbs 
Angeles. 

The second of the ambitious entertainments 
scheduled for August at the Hotel Redondo was 
given last Monday evening in the big ball room. 
"A Bachelor's Reverie" was beautifully illustrated 
with living pictures. Mrs. A. Picher gave the read- 
ing and an orchestra furnished incidental music. 
The following appeared in the pictures: Mrs. J. Ab- 
bott, E. L. Bettner, Miss Mildred Coe, Miss Bess 
Woollacott, Miss Dorothy Woollacott, Miss Vir- 
ginia Osburn, Miss Clara O'Mara, Mrs. Harry Tut- 
tle, Mrs. Robert Bettner, Miss Mona Bottsford, 
Miss Harriet Picher, Miss Virginia Boteler, Miss 
Rockwell, Mis Harriet Picher, Mrs. Dennet. 

Mrs. Nellie G. Cheatham, who has been passing 
the summer in La Jolla, was entertained part of the 
week in Los Angeles. Mrs. Cheatham will leave 
Los Angeles next Wednesday, going first to Vic- 
toria by boat and traveling thence to Chicago. She 
returns to her old home in Kentucky early in the 
autumn. Mrs. Cheatham, who is a relative of Wil- 
loughby Rodman, has been a social favorite since 
she came to the coast more than a year ago. 

The son and grandson of General Terrazas, gov- 
ernor of Chihuahua, accompanied by half a dozen 
relatives, have been passing the week in Los Aii- 



<*?**?***. 



317-3M 314-32* 

So.n„„ A „„ A , ^jg5g5« S„. 11,1.1. 8,.tc. 

A. PYJ8BNOT CO. 

"THe Store Beautiful" 



The values you purchase from the "Ville" are more 
than good; especially is this true regarding Ladies' 
Hosiery and Underwear. In these departments you 
will find many choice selections — certain to be eager- 
ly purchased. 

Ladies 9 Mossery 

Plain black cotton stockings; extra good value. 

Per pair 25c 

Our regular 35c stockings, or 3 pair for $1.00, 
come in the all black foot, split foot and the maco 
foot. 

New line of silk lisle hread. Per pair 50c 

A plain lisle hose; garter top; 35c a <pair or 3 
pair for $1.00 

Plain lisle vests. Each 40c 

High neck, long sleeve vest, in both lisle and 

cotton 50c 

Union suits in swiss or jersey ribbed; low neck, 

sleeveless, knee length. At 75c 

Nice lisle thread vests; high neck, long sleeves. 60c 



ARTS AND 

MRS. 
Hand Painted China 
Hammered Metals 
Burnt and Modeled Leather 


CRAFTS SHOP 

C. D. WESTON 

Home Phone E 3Z4S 

34"7 S- Broadway 



Blhnmiasuieff' iBalhial&toiFitiainm 

BULUNG'S METHOD OF MUNICH for the treatment of diseases of the 
air passases-CATARRH. BRONCHITIS. ASTHMA and TUBERCU- 
LOSIS. Avisit to our Inhalatorium should be made b; alt sufferers from 
these diseases. The medical profession is especially invited. Send for booklet 



409 Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Phone F-1674 



PARLOR MILLINERY. 



dllb 



Miss L-illie B. Moore 
200-2 Coulter Building 



Hats on Display at Coulter* s 



Phone F 3I7S 



Visit the A*i 


ditorium 


And occupying the entire ninth floor you will find 
the finest and best equipped bath and toilet parlors 
in the west— FOR BOTH MEN AND WOMEN. 
Steam. and Electric Light baths — Body Shampoo — 
Vaco Pneumo Massage — Hair Dressing and Facial 
Treatment. 


Auditorium Bath and 


Toilet 


Parlors 



24 



Pacific Outlook 



geles. The party includes : Senor and Senora Luis 
Terrazas, son and daughter-in-law. of Governor 
Terrazas, Senor Guilermo Munz, grandson of the 
governor, and Senora Munz, Senorita Julia Mae 
Creel and Senorita Marie Prieto. While awaiting 
the arrival of Enrique Creel, Mexican ambassador 
at Washington, the visitors enjoyed many sight- 
seeing tours. Senora Creel. is a daughter of General 
Terrazas and her arrival completed a family group 
of distinguished men and women. 

The wedding of Miss Rachel Newson and Roy 
Tufts, son of the late John Q. Tufts, will take place 
Wednesday evening, August 21, at the Newson 
home, Linda Vista. Miss Newson is one of the 
prominent society girls of Oakland and Mr. Tufts 
belong to one of the old established families of Los 
Angeles. Miss Ruby Newson, a sister of the bride, 
will act a maid of honor. There will be four brides- 
maids: Miss Clara Laws of Auburn, Miss Nettie 
Jordan, Miss Kitty Kutz and Miss Edna Ingram. 

Miss Miriam Foster Avery, who came to Los 
Angeles with her mother, Mrs. Rachel Foster 
Avery, has made many friends here. She is a typi- 
cal Philadelphia girl who dresses in the charming 
taste that distinguishes the residents of the Quaker 
City. She is tall, handsome and winning. Miss 
Avery is a graduate of the Moravian Seminary of 
Bethlehem, Pa. She will accompany her mother to 
Holland to which country Mrs. Avery will go on an 
important mission. 

Mayor Harper was guest of honor last Saturday 
at the South Coast Yacht club house. After a day 
of sailing on the bay at San Pedro an elaborate din- 
ner was served. In the party that accompanied the 
mayor were : City Attorney Leslie R. Hewitt, Em- 
mett Wilson, W. C. Downing, Dr. G. A. Lauber- 
sheimer, Frank Goings, J. W. Vaughn, I. B. Dock- 
weiler, W. T. Craig and D. A. Laubersheimer. 

Carroll A. Stilson left Los Angeles last Wednes- 
day for Berkeley. This will be Mr. Stilson's sec- 
ond year at the University of California, where he 
is counted one of the brightest of the undergradu- 
ates. Mr. Stilson passed his vacation with his 
mother, Mrs. W. W. Stilson, at their beautiful new 
home on Kensington Road, whence a number of 
short trips to the various resorts were made. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur R. Elliott of Chicago passed 
the week in Los Angeles. Dr. Elliott is one of the 
leading specialists of the middle west and Mrs. El- 
liot is widely known as a teacher of dramatic inter- 
pretation. They were entertained by Dr. Elliott's 
mother, Mrs. Robert Elliott of Kensington road and 
Mrs. Elliott's mother, Mrs. N. S. McNeish of Mar- 
mion way. 

Mrs. Valentine Peyton is chaperoning a party at 
Santa Barbara. The trip to the beach was made 
last Saturday in her motor car. In the party are 
Miss Edna Peyton, Miss Mabel Gregory, Jack Mc- 
Farland and Jack Jeffreys. At Santa Barbara Miss 
Gregory's brother, Harry Gregory, is acting as host 
at the Hotel Potter. 

Miss Bessie Belle Thew and Frederick A. Miller 
were married last Saturday afternoon at the home 
of Mrs. Ethel Satterlee Bennett, No. 912 South Bur- 
lington avenue. The Rev. Warren F. Day officiated. 
Miss Grace Walworth Bates was the only attend- 
ant. After the ceremony a wedding supper was 



... Ihe Stumbling Block ... 

By Justus Miles Forman 

A story of two heroines and a hero by the author of 
"Buchanan's Wife." The characters are American, 
and the principal scenes are laid in New York City 
and a little near-by town. A book that will while 
away many a dull vacation hour. Price $1.35. 

CUNNINGHAM, CURTISS & WELCH CO. 

Successors to STOLL & THAYER CO. 
The Big Book Store 252 S. SPRING ST. 

The Store with the Money Back Policy 




Sing Fat Co., inc. 

Chinese and Japanese Bazaar 

Largest in America 

LOCATED AT THE 

CENTRAL DEPARTMENT STORE 

Third Floor 

609-ig South Broadway 

MAIN STORE 1121 POST STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 



Los .Angeles 



Ostrich Farm 



Opposite 

EAST LAKE PARK 

5c Car Fare on City Cars 

City Salesroom 
324 S. Broadway 

Most Beautiful Feather Display Ever Made 

in Los Angeles 

Manufacturers* Prices 

We Repair, Redye and Recurl 

3 Acres of Gigantic 
=Birds : 





Visitors are Cordially Invited 



AUDITORIUM 
5th and Olive Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER... 



Beauty in Natural Hair 

The Florentine Hair Restorer will restore grey hair 
to its natural shade. 

It is a restorative — not a dye. Will cure dandruff 
— prevent falling hair — and leave it soft and fluffy. 
Florentine Hair Dressing College, Suite 3, 227 Mercantile Place 



Pacific Outlook 



25 



served. The bride was attired in an elaborately em- 
broidered white linen gown. She is a dramatic 
reader widely known in Southern California and a 
playwright of much promise. Mr. and Mrs. Miller 
will be at home at No. -'44 South Figueroa street. 

Miss Ruth Comfort Mitchell, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. John S. Mitchell. No. 620 St. Paul street, has 
returned to her home after a trip of thirteen months 
abroad. Miss Mitchell, who is still a very young 
girl, has made a reputation as a playwright. 

Mrs. Kate S. Vosburgh, No. 2345 South Figueroa 

street, has returned from her visit to t'atalina. 

where she acted as hostess at a number of enter- 
tainments, among which was a dinner dance at the 
Hotel Metropole. 

Miss Inez V. Everett, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Everett No. 927 Beacon street, and Walter 
R. S. Home were married Wednesday evening. The 
Rev. C. C. Pierce performed the ceremony. 

Mrs. Gertrude D. Treher, a singer from New 
York city, has come to live in Los Angeles. She 
has been heard at several concerts and church ser- 
vices and has won many friends. 

Mrs. C. C. Carpenter. No. 1 1 53 West Twenty- 
seventh street, accompanied by her daughters. Miss 
Clara. Susan and Fannie Carpenter, has gone to 
Santa Barbara for a fortnight. 

Mrs. Charles D. Dag-gett is entertaining her 
daughter. Mrs. Bryson Harvey, of Chicago at the 
beautiful Daggett home, Columbia Hill, Pasadena. 

Miss Ava Gary, niece of Judge Elbert H. Gary, 
steel magnate of Atherton, 111., is visiting at the 
home of W. R. Wheat, No. 176 Bonnie Brae street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland Bishop of West Adams 
street this week joined their daughter. Miss Huston 
Bishop, at the Hotel Potter, Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. W. Irving Way will start East Tuesday. 
Mrs. Way will visit Chicago and pass some time at 
her old home in Fond-du-Lac, Wisconsin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Blossom of Pasadena 
have been occupying a cottage at Idyllwild for the 
last fortnight. 

Miss Elizabeh Riordan, who is still a school girl, 
has been most popular in the social entertainments 
at Laguna Beach. With her mother, Mrs. D. M. 



Riordan, the talented pianiste, she has been passing 
several weeks al the resort which has been mosl 

in favor anion;,; artists. 

Miss Charlene Coulter is one of the most popular 

girls in the exclusive social circle at Avalon this 
se ison. 

Miss Jessie Kennedy and Stanley Kennedy of 
Honolulu are visiting their uncle. D. W. Kirkland. 

Mrs. Walter Xcuhall. No. 21 Chester Place, has 
gone to Santa Barbara For a six weeks' visit. 

Major and Mrs. !•'.. F. C. Klokke. Miss Helen 
Klokke and Ernest Klokke are at Reddndo. 

Airs. Randolph Miner entertained this week at a 
luncheon at the California Club. 

Captain Harmon D. Ryus has returned from a 
trip to the City of Mexico. 

Mrs. Dan L. McFarland and Mrs. Charles Mc- 
Farland are at Catalina. 

Professor Franz A. Bischoff and family are at 
Sunset Beach. 

* * * 

Famous Priest Coming West 

The Abbe Felix Klein, professor of literature in 
the University of Paris, will deliver a series of lec- 
tures in San Francisco and it is hoped that he can 
be persuaded to speak in Los Angeles. The abbe 
is best known in the United States as the author 
of "In the Land of the Strenuous Life." which is 
dedicated to President Roosevelt. His lecture tour 
is made under the management of Father Stark of 
the Paulist fathers and he will speak on the pres- 
ent position of the Catholic church in France. 

* * * 

Roosevelt's Good Angel 

Martin W. Littleton, of New York, the former 
Texan who spilled his eloquence over the St. Louis 
convention in 1904 that nominated Judge Parker 
for President, when he was placing Parker in 
nomination, went up to the White House with 
Representative Fitzgerald, of Brooklyn. "Mr. 
President," said Fitzgerald, "I want to present to 
you the man who did more toward your election in 
1904 than any other." "Indeed," said the Presi- 
dent, immediately interested. "How was that?" 
"Why, he made the speech nominating Parker." 



The Reynolds Brothers' 



Thoroughly 
Patented 



Wave Motor 



Indorsed 



Based on Correct Principles and Sound Philosophy 




CALIFORNIA WAVE MOTOR CO. 



A complete unit system of wave 
power production, equali2ation and 
transmission. Backed by conservative 
business judgment and planned by in- 
telligent mechanics. Utilizes the hori- 
zontal motion of the ocean waves, the 
greater force of the ocean's energy. 
One of the great things that is com- 
ing that can scarcely be spoken of in 
figures. Solves the question of light, 
heat and power without the use of 
fuel of any kind. Use good judgment 
and buy stock in it now, while it is 
young. Grow up with it and become 
a member of the richest corporation 
in the world. 

312 South Broadway 



26 



Pacific Outlook 




Miss Stoddard's Warm Reception 

If one may judge from a first appearance, which 
in stock work is a most exacting ordeal, Miss 
Blanche Stoddard, the new leading woman at the 
Belasco, is an artist of such fine possibilities that 
she will be a strong sustaining force in a stock com- 
pany which is as. good as any in the United States. 
Miss Stoddard is a woman of delightful personality. 
One feels her wide experience, her broad intelli- 
gence and her fine nature. Moreover, she is an 
actress splendidly trained. She has the technique 
that enables her to be always ready to make the 
most of a sentence or a situation. Clyde Fitch's 
light piece of dramatic material, "Her Own Way," 
was the play that gave Miss Stoddard her introduc- 
tion to a Belasco audience and she was received 
with a warmth and enthusiasm that must have 
made her exceedingly happy. Next to Miss Stod- 
dard, Harry Glazier scored highest this week, for 
his Sam Coast is a masterly delineation. Lewis 
Stone and Richard Vivian, who have been enjoy- 
ing long vacations, were welcomed home with much 
cordial applause. 



Will Come to the Coast 

Announcement that Madame Calve has sent her 
agent to the coast for the purpose of buying 1,000 
acres of land best suited for a vineyard naturally 
awakens wide interest. It is rumored that the fam- 
ous singer is planning for a permanent home in 
Southern California when she retires from the stage. 
It is even asserted that this may be her last season 
before the public. Madame Calve w.ill come to Los 
Angeles September I and will rest for a month be- 
fore beginning her forty weeks' tour at the Fall Fes- 
tival in Bangor, Maine. She will return to Los An- 
geles to sing next December. 



Notes 

Reports of Richard Mansfield's condition each 
week indicate that he cannot survive long. Al- 
though it is given out that he is suffering from a 
nervous breakdown, it is generally known that he 
is a victim of an internal cancer. This knowledge 



that the famous actor, the greatest man on the 
American stage today, is near to death must sadden 
every lover of true art. His Peer Gynt, his last 
success, will become a historic memory. 

John H. Blackwood will celebrate the anniversary 
of the opening of the Belasco Theater next month 
by putting on a sumptuous production of "The 
Taming of the Shrew" with Miss Blanche Stoddard 
as Katherine and Hobart Bosworth as Benedick. 

L. E. Behymer announces that his trip to San 
Francisco for the purpose of booking his star musi- 
cal attractions has been successful, although the 
women's clubs had to be coaxed when it comes 
to making big guarantees. 

Two Californians are in the cast of "The Man of 
the Hour". They are Holbrook Blinn and Hugo 
Toland. 

Herman Genss, the pianist, has organized a Con- 
servatory of Music for San Francisco. Among those 
who are to be associated with the new venture are : 
Giulio Minetti, violinist and concertmaster ; Dr. H. 
J. Stewart, Samuel Adelstein, Arthur Weiss, Harry 
Samuels, L. Newbauer, and Miss Grace Freeman. 



Sets Aside All Precedent 

"Sherlock Holmes" at the Burbank this week 
delighted crowds that enjoy thrills without suffer- 
ing from the drawback of a tendency to keen analy- 
sis. Mr. Frawley is a disappointment in the leading 
part, for he sets aside all precedents and gives a 
characterization quite his own. It is doubtful 
whether Conan Doyle would recognize his own 
creation, but fortunately the Burbank patrons ap- 
peared not to be troubled with traditions. . Miss 
Hall as Alice Faulkner and Miss Gilbert as Madge 
Larrabee are in every way acceptable. 




A PROPOSITION 



Sri?* 



Ann 



piano 



The reputation of the piano manufacturer — 
supported by his industrial and financial 
ability — is the surest safeguard of the Piano 
Purchaser. Demand the best — a Baldwin. 

D. H. BALDWIN ®> CO. 

The Auditorium 431 W. Fifth St.. 




Office Phone: Ji lost 



Mme. M. DuCrey 
of Paris 

Permanently removes 
deep wrinkles, smallpox 
pitting, freckles, moles 
and all facial blemishes. 

Bust developing, super- 
fluous hair removed, scalp 
treatment and manicuring. 

355 South Hill Street 
Residence Phone: E 2727 



Pacific Outlook 



•11 



A. Tourist's Memory 

Mr-. 1>. C. McCan this week received from one 
hi her friends in Milwaukee a letter that is like a 
page from the history of Los Angeles. The writer 
i» Mrs. Ella Kneeland Gregory, ;i niece of James 
Kneeland, the \\ isconsin pioneer, and man of affairs 
mentioned in the letter. James Kneeland was a na- 
tive of New York and belonged to the famous old 
family of Ins name which was associated with many 
distinguished services to the country. In early 
manhood he was popular in Washington and re- 
tained a close friendship with Dolly .Madison until 
the death of the renowned American beauty and 
White House hostess. lie went tO Milwaukee 
when that city was little more than a village and 
there added to his inherited fortune. With his fav- 
orite niece he made a journey to the coast in [886, 
when he was an old man but still active in public 
matters. 

"Thanks for the book. 'Greater Los Angeles' ", 
writes Mrs. Gregory. "It was exceeding interest- 
ing to me because 1 saw the city in its swaddling 
clothes, that is. twenty-one years ago. and the 
changes made me feel like Rip Van Winkle just 
awakening. One of the most interesting factors in 
the enjoyment of my visit to the city in 1900, four- 
teen vears after the first sight of it, was the re- 
curring surprise caused bv the innumerable changes 
and the wonderful growth of the city.' When we 
were there in 1886 we thought there would be no 
place for us to stay in the whole town, for even then 
it was fairly swamped with tourists. Finally, the 
St. Elmo, the best hotel, found us rooms over a 
store near by and we took our meals at a hostelry 
that 1 almost searched in vain for upon my next 
visit. After some days we found it in the Chinese 
quarter, boarded up and abandoned. The St. Elmo 
had the worst element of negro waiters and used 
red fringed doilies for napkins. The waiters struck 
wdiile we were there and then the waiting was a go- 
as-you-please. We know the town from the hotel, 
so after locating it, I could realize how the city 
had been built quite away from that side of it in 
what had been formerly the country. 

"The funniest thing was the' postoffice. There 
were no deliveries by postmen and we had to go 
for our mail. At the office were three windows, one 
for the first half of the alphabet and the other for 
the latter half and long lines were formed running 
out into the street for nearly a block. The third 
window was for women only but it was wellnigh 
a hopeless effort to attempt to obtain any attention 



from it as there were only three clerks in the entire 
office to do all the work and one of them was a 
woman who was not in an) sense a new woman. 

CJncle wanted hi- home paper everj day, much to 
their surprise, so they suggested to him to come in 

and pick hi- own mail out. In return for their kind- 
ness he wrote and received the promise from Wash- 
ington to build a new postoffice at once. I'ncle 
had some influential friends who pushed the matter 

and the office I saw in M was the result. I was 

amused when the new office, so magnificent in the 
book, was seen. Then the hotels were the greatest 
surprise. W hen we were going the second time, we 
askd a friend where her parents stayed and she 
said 'At the 1 lollenheck'. so there we went. A young 
clerk told us it was more for men than women, but 
they were going to make it so pleasant we would 
not go on to Santa Barbara in three days as we 
expected and sure enough he planned out some new 
enjoyment or sight to see each day and we re- 
mained twelve days and were made most comfort- 
able. Now there seem to be so many hotels, all so 
fine, that we would be at a loss to know which to 
choose. I think your city way beyond Milwaukee." 

* * * 

"Will Serve as a Model 

Robert Chisholm, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Chis- 
holm. No. 1226 Arapahoe street, will serve as the 
model for the bronze statue, "Electricity," which 
Mrs. Lewis Saint-Gaudens has been commissioned 
to make for the union station at Washington, D. 
C. Mrs. Saint-Gaudens is the sister-in-law of the 
late Augustus Saint-Gaudens and ranks well with 
him as a sculptor. Her husband also is a sculptor 
of note. She met Mr. Chisholm at Pomona, where 
the young athlete is one of the popular students. 

* * * 

Bust of Francis Murphy 

Frank F. Stone has made a clay model for the 
bust of Francis Murphy which has met with the 
most sincere appreciation from the members of the 
great reformer's family. Mr. Stone has made also 
a relief medallion from the death mask. 



RULE <Sfc S ONS CO. 

^^^^^^^^^™" ""^^^^^^^" (Incorporated) """^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^™ 



REAL ESTATE— MINES 
GENERAL INSURANCE 

Suite 223, Pacific Electric Bldg. 



Home Ex. 601 
Main 8535 




Studebaker Junior 



The children's delight. Get one for the 
little folks. Fitted with both pole and 
shafts. 

NEWELL MATHEWS COMPANY 



Studebaker Agency 



"Wagons 



Carriages 



Impleme nt s 



200-02-04 N. Los Angeles St. 
Los Angeles J- & California 



28 



Pacific Outlook 



DirtHday of Los Ang'eles 

The one hundred and twenty-sixth anniversary of 
the founding of Los Angeles was celebrated Thurs- 
day at the Plaza church. General Joseph Aguilar, 
who fought with the Mexican army and afterward 
served with the United States troops under General 
Fremont, fired a salute of twenty-one guns at sun- 
rise and unfurled the American, the Mexican and 
the Spanish flags under which the city has been 
governed. Father Juan Caballeria celebrated sol- 
emn high mass at 10 o'clock. The music under the 
direction of Professor Gardner was a memorable 
feature of the day. In the afternoon hundreds of 
children assembled in the patio back of the priests' 
house and there was much merrymaking. In the 
evening the lecture, delivered in Spanish and Eng- 
lish by Professor Raphael M. Gallego, M. A., of the 
Universities of Peru and Ecuador, traced the his- 
tory of Los Angeles and the missions. Bishop Con- 




Faxher Juan Cabai,i,eria 

aty and Father Caballeria made brief addresses. 
The young women of the St. Cecilian Society sang 
the Spanish national air. This- was followed by 
"Sombrero Blanco" and "La Ferula," which afford- 
ed the boys and girls of the parish chances to sing 
and dance. The Gonzales family presented a clever 
comedy, "The Little Rebel," written by Mrs. Myrtle 
Gonzales. The day closed with a salute fired by 
General Aquilar. 

* * * 
Novel Club Building' Begun 
Work on the fine building designed as a home for 
the Men's Club of Christ Church, at Tenth and 
Hoover streets, was begun this week. It is ex- 
pected that the building, which is to cost $25,000, 
will be completed in four months. It is to be hand- 
somely furnished, the sum of $5,000 having been 
appropriated for the purpose. An early English de- 



sign of architecture has been selected. On the first 
floor will be a large reception hall reading room, a 
billiard room, a pool room, a gymnasium and bowl- 
ing alleys. An auditorium with a seating capacity 
of five hundred has been provided on the second 
floor. In addition to the auditorium, rooms for var- 
ious purposes have been conveniently arranged. 
These include a kitchen, dining rooms, dressing 
rooms and rest rooms. It is said that this will be 
a unique departure in club history as the Men's 
Club will be the only one of its kind in the United 
States. The officers are as follows : The Rev. Baker 
P. Lee, president ; Geo. W. Parsons, vice-president ; 
J. W. Badger, secretary-treasurer ; building commit- 
tee, C. A. Rockwell, Wesley Clark, Bert Williams, 
A. M. Chaffey ; board of directors, Baker P. Lee, 
J. W. Badger, Ben Williams, Geo. W. Parsons, C. 

A. Rockwell, Dr. D. K. Dickinson, Clem S. Glass, J. 

B. Chaffey, Thos. L. Woolwine ; executive com- 
mittee, A. M. Chaffey, chairman ; Clem S. Glass, R. 
D. Richards. 

* * 9 

About Prominent Personages 
Citizens of St. Joseph, Mich., have started a move- 
ment to erect a monument to Ben King, the humor- 
ist and poet, a native of the lakeside city. Mr. 
King's "If I Should Die Tonight" has been re- 
printed many times and thousands of copies of the 
little book of verse put out by his friend, Nixon 
Waterman, after the young writer's death, have 
been sold. 

Announcement of the engagement of Miss Mary 
Harriman and William Straight, American consul- 
general at Mukden, Manchuria, is said to have 
caused violent opposition on the part of E. H. Har- 
riman. Mr. Straight, who is just 30, is a graduate 
of Cornell and a man of brilliant promise. 

United States Senator Albert J. Beveridge and 
Miss Katherine Eddy of Chicago were married 
Wednesday at the American embassy, Berlin. An- 
other marriage of international interest this 
week was that of Miss Katrina Wright, daugh- 
ter of General Luke E. Wright, retiring am- 
bassador to Japan, and Charles Day Palmer, man- 
ager of the International Banking Company of 
Manila. The ceremony was performed at the 
American Embassy, Tokio. 

* * * 

.A. Goal for "Young Men 

"It is the. active, healthy, ambitious young man, 
with red blood in his veins, who will be interested 
by the facts here presented," writes C. C. Chapman 
of Fullerton and Los Angeles in an article in Sunset 
summarizing the opportunities offered ambitious 
young men by the Pacific coast. "His yearning to 
achieve requires something more than common- 
place opportunity to satisfy. To win success, to 
become a factor in the world, he is willing to brave 
the jungle, endure the desert, bury himself in a fac- 
tory, or fight for his business life and honor in 
marts of trade. He is determined to win. His 
work is done with zest and relish. The clash of 
conflict to him is music. All temporary considera- 
tion of home, ease and luxury fail to restrain him 
when opportunity calls. Without compunction or 
regret he tears himself from the tender bonds of 
family and friends, and eagerly faces the obstacles 
he must dig through in his striving for a future. It 



Pacific Outlook 



29 



i- Mich young men — the kind of young men who '1" 
things in this world- who, with enthusiasm and 
impetuosity, >■> frequently sacrifice themselves and 
their power- on the tir-i opportunity which pre- 
sents itself. They are so active and eager that it is 
hard for them t>> calm)} ponder over various pos 
sibilities and choose with deliberation that which is 
genuinely for permanent best interest. Like the 

six hundred at Balaklava, they are ready to charge 
into tlte cannon's mouth. Countless armies of them, 
fired by the examples of success in the large cities 

in the East, throng to the great centers of popula- 
tion, there to destroy, it" not to he destroyed, in the 
terrific struggle, which is inevitable from lack of 
room and limited opportunity. Only a small-part 
of fertile America's annual crop of virile young 
men is turned towards the broad West, where there 
much room to grow, where opportunity is 
limitless, and where the future holds out rewards 
far ahead of anything that can be wrung from the 
established affluence of the East. So loud is the. 
hum of industry, and so dazzling the glamour of 
the great cities, that the distant call of a mighty 
empire — the call for sturdy, robust young men — 
is heard only by the far-seeing few. These few be- 
come empire-builders." 

* * * 
Lucius Tuttle.President Maine Railroad 

The relations between capital and labor are so 
peculiarly interdependent and mutual that neither 
can achieve the highest and most beneficial results 
except through the cordial and honest co-operation 
of the other ; and as everywhere under modern con- 
ditions — and notably in our own land — the em- 
ployed of yesterday is the employer of today, the 
problems confronted in attempting to harmonize 
differences between the two interests are every day 
becoming better understood, and in consequence 
present less difficulties in their solution. 

That the hoped for peaceful adjustment of those 
important and vital differences between employer 
and employed that constitute the so-called labor 
problem is something more than a dream of Utopia 
is clearly evidenced by a survey of the steady and 
permanent progress to that end, made during the 
last quarter of a century — best illustrated, perhaps, 
in the service of public transportation. 

The great army of railroad employes, through 
the necessities of their training and by the precision 
required in the performance of their duties, takes, 
as a class, in the matter of intelligence, very high 
rank among the world's workers; and the}' have not 
failed to meet the natural expectation that they 
would be among the first to seize upon and assist 
in working out a better and more humane way of 
adjusting the many complex problems that are con- 
stantly arising in connection with their employment 
than the barbarous and Wasteful methods of the 
coercive strike. In their desire for improved condi- 
tions, the illusive theories of socialism have not ap- 
pealed to them but have been rated by them at their 
true lack of value. 

The work attempted — as is often true of new 
and untried ventures — had crude beginnings and 
suffered many mishaps and rude shocks from the 
mistaken zeal and over-haste of unwise leadership ; 
but as the general plan of attempting the substitu- 
tion of reasonable negotiation for violent coercion 



has, from the start, received cordial approval at the 

hands of the more intelligent railroad managers 
everywhere, it has now reached so workable a state 
of perfection that an appeal to the arbitrament of 
violence in the settlement of labor questions in rail- 
road service has become a remote, if not an impos- 
sible, ci mtingency. 

* * * 

His Golden Jubilee''' 

Old Uncle Jacob was walking majestically' up and 
down the village street dressed in his Sunday suit. 

"Hallo. Uncle Jacob," cried one of the neighbors, 
"are you having a holiday?" 

"Yes, I am," replied Uncle Jacob, proudly. "I'm 
celebrating my golden wedding." 

"Then why isn't your wife celebrating it with 
you ?" 

"She ain't got ought to do with it," replied Uncle 
Jacob indignantly. "She's the fourth." 

* * * 
Editorial Prerogative 

Editor (to caller, who has been airing his views) 
— Look here, are you the editor of this paper? 

Caller — No, no ; certainly not. 

Editor — Very well, then ; don't stand there and 
talk like a fool ! 

* * * 

"Remarkable phenomenon in our neighborhood 

this morning." "So?" "Yep. The ice man left 

hailstones as big as hen's eggs!" — Cleveland 
Leader. 



IDEAL 



SKin Food and Tissue Builder 

VESTAL CREAM 

50 Cents 
AUDITORIUM PHARMACY 

HENRY J. MARTIN 
Home Ex. 268 Broadway 2900 Auditorium Building 




Summer Prices 

IN 

Table 
Silverware 



We need the room for our fall stock and offer both 
Solid Silver and Plated Ware at greatly reduced 
prices. 



Wo are Practical Watchmahers - 




"You See Us 





BRIGDEN m PEDERSEN 

507 S. SPRING STREET HOTEL ALEXANDRIA 



30 



Pacific Outlook 



Stray Notes of Interest 

Thomas W. Lawson of "Frenzied Finance" fame 
has purchased a controlling interest in the Con- 
soliated Arizona Smelting company which operates 
the Humboldt smelter. 

Mrs. Katherine Tingley, the "Purple Mother" of 
Point Loma, is on her way to England where she 
will build a Theosophical Academy. Mrs. Tingley is 
accompanied by Mrs. Walter Hanson and Miss 
Herbert, two of the leading women in the San 
Diego Institution. 

Governor Buchtel of Colorado and Judge Ben B. 
Lindsey of Denver have been interviewed in Chi- 
cago. Judge Lindsey said :"Governor Buchtel is a 
very nice gentleman and a good man, but is sur- 
rounded by friends who are ill advisers. He is 
preaching about anarchy in our state when there 
is no such thing." Governor Buchtel said: "Judge 
Lindsey is a good man, an able lawyer, but he 
wants to be the Joe Folk of Missouri for Colorado." 

Mrs. Clarence Hopkins Burritt, mother of Edith 
Dorothy Creede, to whom Nicholas Creede, the 
Colorado millionaire, left his fortune, is a visitor at 
Abbot Kinney's Venice. She is a contralto singer 
and has been heard several times in the Auditorium 
of the beach resort. 

The Pasadena Humane Society has arranged for 
a parade of work horses in the Labor Day pro- 
cession at the Crown City. Prizes have been of- 
fered for heavy draught horses, truck teams and 
teams used for delivery wagons. 

* *■ * 

Ingenuity of Man 

That we are living in an age of progress and in- 
vention — the result of man's resourcefulness — is 
shown by the numerous mechanical devices which 
are constantly being brought forth by men who are 
devoting their lives to scientific research. Whe'n 
Morse invented the telegraph it was declared that 
he had reached the zenith of the ingenuity of man ; 
but discoveries of later years have proven that he 
had but marked the beginning of the wonderful de- 
vices in which electricity is applied. Edison's dis- 
coveries regarding the possibilities in the applica- 
tion of electrical energy have undergone a series of 
changes until one might well say that the end of the 
discovering age is wellnigh at hand ; but the longer 
we live the more forcibly are we impressed by the 
saying that "the ingenuity of man has no limit." 

It long' has been recognized that the force of the 
ocean's waves beating upon our barren shores rep- 
resents far more power and ener